Monash University Staff Media Commentary on the Downing of MH17 and the War in Eastern Ukraine

Melbourne's Ukrainian community mourns the victims of the MH17 disaster
Melbourne’s Ukrainian community mourns the victims of the MH17 disaster

Since early 2014, several events at Monash University and at other universities with the involvement of Monash staff and visitors to Monash have sought to clarify the situation in Ukraine on the eve of, and after, the fall of the Yanukovych regime.

The downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 on 18 July focussed unprecedented international attention on Ukraine. Professor Marko Pavlyshyn, director of the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies, and other Monash academics have responded to multiple media inquiries about the contexts of this disaster.

The links below bring together some of this material.

19 February 2014: Monash European and EU Centre, Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies, Round Table, “What Future for Ukraine?” The roundtable was broadcast on ABC Radio National’s “Big Ideas” program

3 March 2014: ABC Radio National, Late Night Live, “Is Ukraine on the Brink of Disaster?” interview with Anne Applebaum, columnist with the Washington Post, and Marko Pavlyshyn

5 March 2014: Bloomberg TV, Professor Marko Pavlyshyn, interview.

13 March 2014: Australian Institute of International Affairs, Victorian Branch, Seminar by Marko Pavlyshyn and Walter Zaryckyj, Executive Director, Center for US-Ukrainian Relations, “Whither Ukraine? The Next Bosnia? Russian Puppet? Or will Ukraine Embrace the EU?

14 March 2014: EU Centre at RMIT, Seminar: “Crisis In and About Ukraine,” speaker:  Walter Zaryckyj; respondents: Stefan Auer, Jean Monnet Chair in EU Interdisciplinary Studies at La Trobe University and Associate Professor in European Studies at Hong Kong University;  Robert Horvath, Australian Research Council Future Fellow at La Trobe University

17 March 2014: CNBC, Marko Pavlyshyn, interview.

7 April 2014: Monash European and EU Centre; the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies, Monash University and the History Program, Arts Faculty, Monash University, Public Lecture: Norman Davies, “Ukraine: Between the EU and Russia.”

29 April 2014: Bloomberg TV, Marko Pavlyshyn, interview.

19 July 2014, Radio 3AW, Melbourne, Marko Pavlyshyn, interview.

20 July 2014: ABC Radio National Sunday Extra, “Will the MH17 disaster be a game changer in the Ukraine crisis?” Leslie Rowe, Australian Ambassador to the Russian Federation 2002-2005, and Marko Pavlyshyn, interviewed by Damien Carrick

Monash scholars print commentary on MH17: Marko Pavlyshyn, Ben Rich, Ben Wellings

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USFA Continues Support for “New History of Modern Ukrainian Literature” Project

The Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia Ltd. has granted a sum of $52,000 in 2014 to support the research project “A New History of Modern Ukrainian Literature,” based in the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies. The grant is the second in a series of three requested over 2013-15. Support commenced in 2013 with an initial grant of $50,000.

Professor Marko Pavlyshyn responds to questions after his keynote address to the Young Scholars' Conference, Institute of Literature, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 19 June 2013
Professor Marko Pavlyshyn responds to questions after his keynote address to the Young Scholars’ Conference, Institute of Literature, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, 19 June 2013

The project, proposed by Professor Marko Pavlyshyn, builds upon his earlier projects, one titled “Bilingualism and Multilingualism in a National Movement: Ukrainian Writers in the Nineteenth Century” and funded by the Australian Research Council, the other on the related topic “Language, Literature and the National Project in 19th-century Ukraine,” funded by the Ukrainian Studies Support Fund of the Association of Ukrainians in Victoria and the Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia Ltd.

Given that the most recent history of Ukrainian literature to appear in English was that of Dmytro Chyzhevs’kyi (itself the translation of a work that was first published in 1956), the new project has as its objective the production of a literary history of Ukraine that takes into account new research and new directions in literary scholarship.

Additional funding for the project is being sought.

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Victor and Maria Rudewych Donate $1.52 Million to Support Ukrainian Studies

Victor Rudewych and Maria Rudewych
Victor Rudewych and Maria Rudewych

On 25 June 2014 Victor and Maria Rudewych, sponsors of many community and educational initiatives, announced their donation of $1.52 million to the Ukrainian Studies Support Fund (USSF) of the Association of Ukrainians in Victoria. The USSF is the granting body from which the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies at Monash University has received much of its research funding in recent years. The gift is the largest single philanthropic donation that Australia’s Ukrainian community has seen to date.

Scholarships

In an arrangement to be formalised in a memorandum of understanding, the donors have stipulated that $300,000 of their gift be earmarked to finance, over three years, up to four PhD scholarships in Ukrainian Studies or in interdisciplinary areas involving Ukrainian Studies.

A further $220,000 is to be reserved for an expansion of the existing Monash Rudewych Ukrainian Language Scholarships in the years 2015-2019. Initially established in 2008 to encourage school students in Australia to take Ukrainian language as a Year 12 subject, provision was made last year to extend such encouragement to students from Year 7 onward. The current further expansion means that eight flagship Year 12 scholarships, valued at $2500 each, will be available each year for the duration of the present arrangement, while $24,000 per annum will be available for the scholarships in more junior years.

Signalling the Importance of Languages and Cultures

The donation more than doubles the USSF’s financial base and increases its ability to provide continuing support for Monash activities in Ukrainian Studies.

Marko Pavlyshyn, Maria Rudewych, Victor Rudewych, Peter Howard, Rita Wilson
Marko Pavlyshyn, Maria Rudewych, Victor Rudewych, Peter Howard, Rita Wilson

At a celebration of the donation the Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Associate Professor Peter Howard, and Associate Professor Rita Wilson, Head of the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, emphasised the longstanding and mutually beneficial relationship between the Ukrainian community and Monash University and welcomed the donation of Victor and Maria Rudewych not only as a contribution to the welfare of Ukrainian Studies at the University, but as a signal to the University as a whole and the Australian community at large of the importance of languages and cultures, and of the value the teaching of them, and research into them.

A Tradition of Philanthropy

Professor Marko Pavlyshyn, Director of the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies, sketched the distinguished history of the benefactions of Victor and Maria Rudewych. Beneficiaries of their generosity include the Association of Ukrainians in Victoria, the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Australia, New Zealand and Oceania, the Ukrainian Youth Association (SUM), and the two Ukrainian community newspapers in Australia Church and Life and The Free Thought.

Mr Marko Misko receives the $1.52 m. cheque from Mr Victor and Ms Maria Rudewych
Mr Marko Misko receives the $1.52 m. cheque from Mr Victor and Ms Maria Rudewych

Mimivic Nominees, the company that Victor Rudewych and Maria Rudewych jointly built up, is a successful industrial development enterprise with the construction of 36 industrial facilities to its credit. Most are in Melbourne, others are in Queensland, South Australia and regional Victoria.

On numerous occasions Victor Rudewych has donated his time and professional expertise to Ukrainian community projects. Two that are of special importance are the construction of the headquarters of Dnister Ukrainian Credit Cooperative Ltd., which he project managed, and the development and establishment of the Ukrainian Elderly People’s Home, where Victor Rudewych’s input included finding and securing the land, negotiating for government funding, project managing the construction, and serving on the committee until the Home became a self-supporting concern.

Among the leaders of the Ukrainian community who lauded the magnanimity of Victor and Maria Rudewych were Mr Stefan Romaniw OAM, president of the Australian Federation of Ukrainian Organisations, Mr Michael Moravski, president of the Association of Ukrainians in Victoria, and Ms Orysia Stefyn, president of the Ukrainian Education Council of Australia, the peak body for Ukrainian Saturday schools.

The focal point of the evening was the presentation of a cheque for the full amount of the donation to the chairperson of the Ukrainian Studies Support Fund Mr Marko Misko.

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Міжнародний конкурс з української мови ім. Петра Яцика в Австралії 2014 р.

Міжнародний конкурс з української мови ім. Петра Яцика в Австралії 2014 р.

Всеавстралійський конкурс 2014 р.:

На вихідні 24-25 травня зорганізовано автомайдан до Канбери і крайову маніфестацію підтримку Україні. Тому відкладено конкурс ім. Яцика на 2014 рік в Австралії.

Деталі нового часу проведення конкурсу будуть подані пізніше. Ми вибачаємося за усі, можливо створені для вас, незручності та дякуємо за розуміння.

Jacyk logo cropped

Petro Jacyk International Ukrainian Language Competition 2014

Victorian participants in the 2013 Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition at Monash
Victorian participants in the 2013 Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition at Monash

Про Конкурс

Завдання конкурсу – заохочувати дітей та молодих людей в Україні та по всьому світі вивчати українську мову та користуватися нею.

Конкурс було засновано 2000 р. завдяки підтримці заслуженого канадсько-українського філантропа Петра Яцика. В Україні Конкурс проводить Ліга українських меценатів.

Сьогодні конкурс обіймає понад двадцять три країни світу. У ньому щороку бере участь більше п’яти мільйонів молодих людей.

Конкурс 2014 р. в Австралії

Конкурс в Австралії проводить Центр україністики ім. Миколи Зерова в Університеті ім. Монаша та Українська Центральна Шкільна Рада Австралії.

Участь у Конкурсі:

Учасники:

У Конкурсі мають право брати участь всі діти та молоді люди, які проживають в Австралії, незалежно від того, чи вони формально навчаються на курсах з української мови в школі чи університеті.

Вік учасників:

9 – 21 років.

Час:

Субота 24 травня 2014 р. Конкурс відкладено – нова дата буде подано пізніше

  • 10.30 – 12.00 (східні штати Австралії))
  • 10.00 – 11.30 (Південна Австралія та Північна Територія)
  • 8.30 – 10.00 (Західна Австралія)

Конкурс відбудеться в той сам день і в тих самих годинах на всіх місцях, де він проводитиметься.

Місце:

  • Учасники у Вікторії: Клейтонський кампус Університету ім. Монаша. Computer laboratories S306 and S310, Building 11, Monash University, Clayton Campus. Лінк до карти з інструкціями є в англомовній версії цієї сторінки.
  • Учасники в НПВ: International Grammar School, 4-8 Kelly St, Ultimo
  • Учасники у Південній Австралії: – Findon Library, Findon Shopping Centre, Corner Findon and Grange Roads, Findon.
  •  Учасники з інших штатів: інформації про місце проведення конкурсу буде надіслано після реєстрації.

Категорії:

З дев’яти до 18 років включно: 10 груп відповідно до віку. В кожній віковій групі будуть дві категорії:

  • Учасники, які отримали частину своєї освіти в Україні;
  • Всі інші учасники.

З дев’ятнадцяти років до 21 року включно: дві категорії: початківці та учасники, які тривалий час вивчали або вивчають українську мову.

Переможці та нагороди

Усі учасники:

Всі, хто візьмуть участь у Конкурсі, отримають Свідоцтво учасника.

Переможці:

Буде оголошено переможця в кожній категорії кожної вікової групи. Учасник кожної категорії, який отримає найвищий бал, отримає:

  • Свідоцтво переможця
  • грошову нагороду (200 дол).

Як вписатися

Завантажте реєстраційну анкету, виповніть її та надішліть на адресу:

електронна пошта: jacykcompetition.au@gmail.com
(підписані анкети слід відсканувати і надіслати як додатки до е-мейлу)

АБО на наступну поштову адресу:

Jacyk Competition

P.O. Box 8076

Dandenong VIC 3175

 

Термін реєстрації: понеділок 12-го травня 2014 р.

Участь у конкурсі безкоштовна

Додаткові інформації

За додатковими інформаціями слід звертатися за адресою:

jacykcompetition.au@gmail.com

Станьте фаном нашої сторінки на FACEBOOK і запросіть друзів:

Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition in AU

Jacyk Facebook

Наша сторінка на сайті

Союзу Українських Організацій Австралії

Australian Federation of Ukrainian Organisations

ozeukes.com

 

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What Future for Ukraine?

"What Future for Ukraine?" Round Table at Caulfield Campus
“What Future for Ukraine?” Round Table at Caulfield Campus

On 19 February the Monash European and EU Centre and the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies hosted a Round Table titled “What Future for Ukraine.” Attended by an audience of 100, the event was recorded by ABC Radio National for broadcast and podcast on the “Big Ideas” program and will go to air on Tuesday 25 February at 8 p.m.

The Round Table was held in the shadow of the eruption of deadly violence in Kyiv, after months of mainly peaceful protests.

Mass protests began in Ukraine in November 2014 when the government suspended preparations for signing an Association Agreement with the European Union. They quickly became a more general expression of anger with the corrupt governing elite and its use of violence and intimidation against peaceful protesters. For the best part of three months, there was tension, but only occasional flare-ups of violence on the streets of Kyiv. That changed on 18 February, when several people were killed and hundreds injured as police tried, unsuccessfully, to drive protesters from Independence Square (the Maidan). The dismissal of president Yanukovych and the calling of presidential elections for 25 May  changed the situation dramatically, but not its underlying causes that are the main focus of the Round Table.

Professor Pascaline Winand, Director of the Monash European and EU Centre, moderated the Round Table, taking the discussion through a survey of the current situation and an exploration of possible ways to resolve the crisis.

Stefan Romaniw, president of the

Pascaline Winand, Marko Pavlyshyn, Jan Pakulski
Pascaline Winand, Marko Pavlyshyn, Jan Pakulski

Australian Federation of Ukrainian Organisations and secretary general of the World Congress of Ukrainians had recently returned from Ukraine, where he had participated in efforts to broker negotiations between representatives of the government and the protesters. Mr Romaniw spoke of the unwillingness of the government side to countenance concessions that could lead to a de-escalation of tension. He noted the broad spectrum of political opinion represented among the protesters and the consequent difficulty of achieving consensus among the anti-government protesters.

Jan Pakulski, Professor of Sociology at the University of Tasmania and president of the Australian Institute of Polish Affairs, drew comparisons between the current critical situation in Ukraine and the circumstances in Poland in 1981 prior to the introduction of martial law in that country. He saw the possibility of a long-term positive resolution in a culture of dialogue between opposing sides and grass-roots work to strengthen civil-society structures.

Natalie Doyle, Stefan Romaniw, Leslie Holmes
Natalie Doyle, Stefan Romaniw, Leslie Holmes

Leslie Holmes, Professor of Political Science at the University of Melbourne, set out the major underlying cause of Ukrainians’ discontent with their government and with the political, economic and administrative system: corruption. The enormous wealth enjoyed by Ukraine’s elites, which the population can only conclude has been corruptly amassed, deprives the regime of legitimacy.

Marko Pavlyshyn, Professor of Ukrainian Studies at Monash University, said that Ukrainians protesting against their government wanted to live in a country where the human rights are sacrosanct, elections free and fair, the judiciary independent, and government serves the interests of the population. These are familiar European values; in that sense, the protests are still about the wish of Ukrainians to be part of Europe. At the same time Ukraine must cultivate normal and productive relations with Russia – in the ideal, a Russia that is also democratic and European.

Natalie Doyle, Deputy Director of the Monash European and EU Centre, Senior Lecturer in French and a co-supervisor of a PhD on contemporary Ukrainian intellectuals spoke of the expectations of freedom, especially freedom of movement, that young people in Ukraine share with their counterparts in Europe and all over the world. She pointed to the detrimental consequences of the European Union’s reluctance to contemplate the possibility of Ukraine’s joining the EU.

Speakers underscored the importance of international pressure, including personal sanctions (refusal of visas and freezing of assets) against members of the Ukrainian regime, in influencing the thinking of the Ukrainian government. A letter urging the Prime Minister of Australia to respond urgently to the Ukrainian crisis was signed by 87 people.

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$32,000 from Victor and Maria Rudewych for Year 12 Scholarships in 2014

Victor Rudewych and Maria Rudewych
Victor Rudewych and Maria Rudewych

The Monash Rudewych Year 12 Ukrainian Language Scholarships received significant new funding for 2014 when Victor and Maria Rudewych boosted their funding for the Scholarships from $20,000 in 2013 to $32,000 in 2014.

The Scholarships were first offered in 2008, when Victor and Maria Rudewych, who also sponsor many other educational and youth initiatives, resolved to join the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies at Monash University in encouraging young people in Australia to study Ukrainian language and culture by establishing four annual scholarships, each valued at $2,500.

Six Year 12 students received the scholarship in 2014: Inna Nikolayeva, Yuri Bakay and Andrew Bernyk from Victoria, and Dariya Vovnenko, Mark Levenets and Peter Sheremeta from New South Wales. Eight year 12 students, five from Victoria and three from New South Wales, won the scholarship in 2013. On 12 April 2013 the Ukrainian Studies Centre at Monash, the sponsors and the peak organisation for Ukrainian community schools in Australia, the Ukrainian Council Education of Australia (UECA), resolved to restructure the scholarships. The agreement was reached at a meeting of Mr Victor Rudewych with Professor Marko Pavlyshyn, Director of the Ukrainian Studies Centre, and Ms Orysia Stefyn, Chair of the UECA. The new structure is designed to begin offering encouragement to students from Year 7 onward.

The terms of the Scholarships in their new form will be advertised on the Monash Ukrainian Studies web page several months in advance of the due date for the receipt of applications, which will be in December 2013.

Marko Pavlyshyn, Victor Rudewych and Orysia Stefyn following agreement on new Monash Rudewych scholarships

Marko Pavlyshyn, Victor Rudewych and Orysia Stefyn following agreement on new Monash Rudewych scholarships

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Monash Ukrainian available online

Monash Ukrainian intermediate, second semester 2013. Front: Adam Jartym, Vicky Tsoi, David Priest (online in Estonia), Aidan Malec, Darcie Apostolou. Back: assistant lecturer Valentyna Shapiro, professor Marko Pavlyshyn
Monash Ukrainian intermediate, second semester 2013. Front: Adam Jartym, Vicky Tsoi, David Priest (online in Estonia), Aidan Malec, Darcie Apostolou. Back: assistant lecturer Valentyna Shapiro, professor Marko Pavlyshyn

Higher education students anywhere in Australia are able to enroll in Monash University’s Ukrainian Studies course. Students have a video link enabling them to participate in classes in real time. Online teaching is available for Ukrainian intermediate units in first and second semester. These units are for students with some previous knowledge of Ukrainian, especially for those with VCE, HSC or SACE in Ukrainian language.

Studying Ukrainian at an Australian university in 2014: a guide for students at universities other than Monash

In 2014 Ukrainian is available at Monash University at two entry levels:

Beginners level: Students enrolled at Monash University and students at other universities who are able to attend classes at the Clayton campus in person may enrol in ATS1211 Ukrainian introductory 1 and ATS1212 Ukrainian introductory 2.

Post-VCE/HSC/SACE level or equivalent: In 2014 Ukrainian intermediate will be available in the distance mode. Classes will include students physically present in an IT classroom at the Clayton campus and students elsewhere participating with the aid of video technology. Students will be able to study Ukrainian for credit toward their degree, subject to permission from their home Faculty. Such students will enrol in ATS2215 Ukrainian intermediate 1 and ATS2216 Ukrainian intermediate 2.

Alternatively, students may enrol for a Diploma in Languages (Ukrainian). The Diploma in Languages (Ukrainian) provides a program of study equivalent to a full undergraduate major in Ukrainian Studies, whether commenced at the introductory or the intermediate level. The Diploma is taken in parallel with the student’s main degree. Normally taking a Diploma alongside the main degree extends the period of study by one year. The Diploma in Languages (Ukrainian) is available to students at universities other than Monash, as well as to Monash students enrolled in Faculties other than Arts.

Procedure for students at universities other than Monash who wish to study Ukrainian for credit toward their main degree

Download the Monash University Cross-institutional Study application form.

Read the explanations at the beginning of the form carefully. Fill in the form, being sure to complete all relevant fields and to provide documentation specified.

If you have completed VCE/HSC/SACE Ukrainian, you will normally apply to enrol in the units ATS2215 Ukrainian Intermediate 1 and ATS2216 Ukrainian intermediate 2. If you have not completed VCE/HSC/SACE Ukrainian, and do not have an equivalent level of competence in Ukrainian, you will normally apply to enrol in ATS1211 Ukrainian introductory 1 and ATS1212 Ukrainian introductory 2.

You will need to provide certified hard copies of certain documents:

  • You will need to demonstrate your citizenship status. If you are an Australian citizen, this will be a certified copy of your birth certificate or passport.
  • You will need to demonstrate that you meet the University’s English language requirements. If you completed the last two years of your secondary schooling in Australia, this will be an official transcript of your VCE/HSC/SACE results. If you have done VCE/HSC/SACE Ukrainian, this transcript will also demonstrate your eligibility to enrol in ATS2215 Ukrainian Intermediate 1.
  • You will need to show that your home institution allows you to enrol in the relevant Monash units. The office of your home Faculty will need to fill in Section C of the form or to provide a letter that contains all of the information that is required in the form.
  • Your home Faculty may ask you for descriptions of the units that you propose to undertake. You will find these in the Monash University online Handbook at the links above. If any additional information is required, you should contact the Ukrainian Studies convenor at Marko.Pavlyshyn@monash.edu

Note that the stated date for receipt of cross-institutional application forms is at the end of January. Recognising that this deadline may be difficult for students to meet, especially students entering university for the first time, the Monash Faculty of Arts will endeavour to be flexible in receiving application forms. However, they should be received as early as possible and no later than one week before the commencement of Orientation Week.

Procedure for Monash Students in Faculties other than Arts, and students at universities other than Monash, who wish to enrol in a Diploma in Languages (Ukrainian)

Download the “Undergraduate Diploma application Faculty of Arts” form.

Read the explanations at the beginning of the form carefully. Fill in the form, being sure to complete all relevant fields and to provide all the documentation specified.

If any additional information is required, you should contact the Ukrainian Studies convenor at Marko.Pavlyshyn@monash.edu

The deadline for receipt of applications from commencing students is the Friday of Orientation Week (28 February 2014)

Importance of complete documentation

Many applications are held up because students submit application forms that are only partly filled in or accompanied by incomplete or uncertified documentation.

If uncertain, ring or e-mail the contacts below to inquire. This advice is especially important to students outside Melbourne who will be supplying their documentation by mail.

Contacts

View online answers or submit an enquiry with http://ask.monash.edu/

  • If inquiring about cross-institutional enrolment, write “Cross-Institutional: Ukrainian” in the subject line.
  • If inquiring about the Diploma, write “Diploma in Languages (Ukrainian)” in the subject line. This will ensure that your inquiry reaches the correct officer.
  • Copy your inquiry to the convenor of Ukrainian Studies at Marko.Pavlyshyn@monash.edu

Telephone:       

  • For enrolment advice, (03) 9902 6011.
  • For advice concerning the content of the course or other general matters, phone the convenor of Ukrainian Studies at (03) 9905 2259.

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Monash Staff Address the Melbourne Maidan

Natalie Doyle and Marko Pavlyshyn at Melbourne's EuroMaidan
Natalie Doyle and Marko Pavlyshyn at Melbourne’s EuroMaidan

On Sunday 15 December 2013 Professor Marko Pavlyshyn, director of the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies at Monash University, and Dr Natalie Doyle, deputy director of the Monash European and EU Centre addressed a rally organised by the Association of Ukrainians in Victoria in support of the EuroMaidans in Ukraine.

Since 21 November demonstrations in Kyiv and other cities in Ukraine, at times numbering many hundreds of thousands of participants, have protested against the decision by the government of Ukraine to curtail preparations for the signing of an Association Agreement between Ukraine and the European Union. These demonstrations, called “EuroMaidans” because their main location is Kyiv’s Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square), have been under threat of violent repression since 30 November, when police special forces attacked and brutally beat peaceful demonstrators. The police actions have catalysed broad-based demands for respect for human rights and the rule of law, for a return to European values in politics and economic life, and for an end to authoritarian and corrupt government.

In many cities around the world, demonstrations expressing solidarity with the protesters in Ukraine have been held, including Sunday’s rally in Melbourne.

Professor Pavlyshyn spoke of the importance of demonstrating international solidarity with the people of Ukraine in their struggle for a future in a free and fair society. Many of the protesters in Ukraine, he pointed out, are university students who understand and cherish European ideals. Among the universities most active on the EuroMaidans are the Kyiv Mohyla Academy University, Kyiv National University and Lviv National University. Monash has sent students to study at all three of these universities.

Melbourne demonstrators support Ukraine's integration with the EU
Melbourne demonstrators support Ukraine’s integration with the EU

Dr Doyle placed the EuroMaidan and its predominantly young protesters in the context of a worldwide disenchantment of young people with the pragmatism and often corruption of contemporary mainstream politics, and their yearning for a politics of ideals – the foundational ideals of freedom and justice with which Europe has once been, and should become again, synonymous.

Click here for the text of Dr Doyle’s speech.

Click here for the text of Professor Pavlyshyn’s speech at the first Melbourne rally in support of the Maidan on 28 November.

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Stephanie Prociw-Charalambous Graduates with BA (Hons) in Ukrainian and History

At the Monash graduation ceremony held on 10 October 2013 Stephanie Prociw-Charalambous was admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honours (First Class) in Ukrainian Studies and History.

Stepanie Prociw-Charalambous with sisters Julia and Anna andmother Marika
Stepanie Prociw-Charalambous with sisters Julia and Anna and mother Marika

Stephanie began learning Ukrainian at the introductory level in 2009. Then a student at the University of Melbourne, she took Ukrainian by cross-institutional enrolment for three years. After obtaining her Bachelor’s degree at Melbourne, Stephanie enrolled for fourth-year Honours at Monash. She took coursework in history to enhance her theoretical knowledge in that field and she wrote her thesis in Ukrainian Studies.

Stephanie’s thesis, “Yearning for the Homeland: The Experiences of Ukrainian Post-War Migrants to Australia Through Literary and Other Cultural Texts (1949-1982),” reported findings based on her research into the works of Australia’s Ukrainian writers and poets, on the one hand, and non-fictional writing published in the newspaper Vil’na dumka, on the other. Adopting a definition of “diaspora” developed by the American political scientist William Safran, the thesis showed that the forms of awareness of self and society reflected in much Ukrainian writing in Australia are characteristic of diasporas. A powerful sense of attachment to the land of origin; a wish to see that homeland free and its people happy; and a belief that the country of settlement is never fully “home”: these were some of the common features that the thesis documented in the works of such poets and writers as Lidiia Daleka, Zoia Kohut, Bozhenna Kovalenko, Dmytro Nytchenko and Vasyl’ Onufriienko, and in selected pieces of journalistic prose.

Stephanie Prociw-Charalambous undertook her honours year as a recipient in 2012 of the Dr Anna Berehulak Memorial Scholarship. Stephanie had previously won the Vasyl and Stefaniia Fokshan Memorial Prize (2011) for best results in second-year Ukrainian Studies and the winner’s award for her age group and skill category in the inaugural Australian division of the Petro Jacyk International Ukrainian Language Competition (2010).

Important for the development of Stephanie’s Ukrainian language competence and her knowledge of Ukrainian culture was her participation, in 2010 and 2011, in the Ukrainian Language and Culture Summer School at the Ukrainian Catholic University (Lviv).

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Monash Rudewych Year 12 Ukrainian Scholarships 2014

Victor Rudewych and Maria Rudewych
Victor Rudewych and Maria Rudewych

The Scholarships were established in 2008 by the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies in the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, with funds generously donated by Mr Victor Rudewych and Mrs Maria Rudewych through their company, the Mimivic Group.

The Scholarships aim to encourage students in Australia to enrol in Ukrainian language programs for the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE), the Higher School Certificate (HSC), or the South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE).

Terms

Up to eight Scholarships will be awarded in 2014. Scholarships will be awarded on the basis of the excellence of applications.

Students who accept a Scholarship promise to complete a formal school-based course of study in Ukrainian and to fulfil the requirements of the VCE, HSC or SACE in Ukrainian in 2014.

The value of each Scholarship will be $2500, of which $1000 will be paid when the Scholarship recipients are announced and the remaining $1500 once it has been confirmed that recipients have completed the 2014 VCE, HSC or SACE Ukrainian Language examination.

A Scholarship Certificate and a cheque for the first $1000 will be presented to each Scholarship holder at a suitable public event in the city where he or she lives.

The Selection Committee may, at its discretion, also confer Encouragement Awards valued at less than $2500 on applicants whose applications display merit. The value of such Encouragement Awards will be determined by the Selection Committee. A portion of the amount awarded will be paid when the Award recipients are announced. The remaining sum will be paid once it has been confirmed that recipients have completed the 2014 VCE, HSC or SACE Ukrainian Language examination.

Applications

Important note: some application rules have changed since the 2013 round. Significant changes are marked in bold.

Deadline for receipt of applications: 22 February 2014.

Each application will comprise:

  1. the applicant’s curriculum vitae. This should include:
  • The applicant’s name in English and Ukrainian;
  • The applicant’s date of birth;
  • The applicant’s contact details, including all of the following: postal address, e-mail address, home telephone number and mobile telephone number;
  • The applicant’s educational history;
  • A list of the applicant’s community or other extra-curricular activities and any outstanding achievements.
  1. copies of statements of results achieved by the applicant in his or her studies in all subjects, including, if applicable, Ukrainian language, in the year 2013, whether in Australia or abroad;
  2. evidence of enrolment in a formal school-based course of study in Ukrainian; and
  3. a 500-word statement in Ukrainian by the applicant, explaining why he or she should be awarded the Scholarship. This statement will be judged for the quality of its argument. Linguistic correctness will be a secondary criterion.

Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Applications may be submitted as an attachment to an e-mail message or on paper.

Applications must be received by 22 February 2014 by e-mail at

Marko.Pavlyshyn@monash.edu

or by mail at the following address:

Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies
School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics
Building 11
Monash University, Victoria 3800

Selection Process

A Selection Committee comprising the director of the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies or his representative, one other member of the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, and a person nominated by the Ukrainian Education Council of Australia will consider applications and announce the successful applicants in mid-March 2014.

Scholarships (and, if applicable, Encouragement Awards) will be conferred only where applications are of sufficient merit.

Eligibility

Australian citizens or permanent residents of Australia 21 years of age or less on the closing date for applications are eligible to apply. There is no requirement for applicants to have been enrolled previously in schools or courses offering Ukrainian language in Australia.

Awards at Years 7-11

Commencing in 2014, Monash Rudewych Awards will be available to students at Years 7-11.

Details will be available in Decembеr 2013.

 

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VCE Students Encouraged to Study Ukrainian at Monash

At the Ukrainian Community School, Noble Park: Anya Solodovichenko, Professor Marko Pavlyshyn, Andrew Zakhartchouk, Maxim Nagorny
At the Ukrainian Community School, Noble Park: Anya Solodovichenko, Professor Marko Pavlyshyn, Andrew Zakhartchouk, Maxim Nagorny

For three Saturdays commencing on 31 August 2013, Professor Marko Pavlyshyn was a guest teacher at the Lesia Ukrainka Ukrainian Community School in Noble Park.

Invited by Ms Orysia Stefyn, principal of the School and an alumna of Monash Ukrainian Studies (she was a member of the very first cohort of students when the program opened in 1983), Professor Pavlyshyn taught the Year 11 and Year 12 class, working with them on the theme of Ukraine’s Orange Revolution of 2004.

The students, two of whom attend the John Monash Science School on the Clayton Campus of Monash University, visited the Matheson Library to conduct part of their research on the Orange Revolution in the Library’s extensive Ukrainian Studies collection.

Among the topics discussed in class were opportunities for the study of Ukrainian at Monash

Students learned that, regardless of the university and Faculty in which they enrolled on completing the Victorian Certificate of Education, they would in almost all cases be able to credit the study of Ukrainian at Monash University to their main degree.

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Monash Students at Lviv Summer School 2013

DAvid Priest and Aidan Malec, participants in the 2013 Ukrainian Language and Culture Summer School, Lviv
DAvid Priest and Aidan Malec, participants in the 2013 Ukrainian Language and Culture Summer School, Lviv

David Priest and Aidan Malec, students of Ukrainian intermediate, took part in the Ukrainian Language and Culture Summer School at Lviv’s Ukrainian Catholic University in July this year.

The School offers intensive programs over a three-week period, including daily face-to-face tuition, to students at five different competence levels. Cultural excursions around the historical city of Lviv and a trip to Kyiv augment participants’ language experience. Credit for courses taken at the School counts toward students’ Monash degree.

Asked to comment on the experience for a Faculty of Arts website about Study Abroad programs, David wrote, “Doing the Ukrainian Summer School will not only build your Ukrainian skills at a remarkably rapid rate, but it will give you great confidence in your ability to use the Ukrainian language in a way no other program could. Look forward to amazing Ukrainian food, the stunningly beautiful city of Lviv, crazy Ukrainian traditions and long-term friendships with the others in the program.”

The Faculty’s site contains a detailed description of the Ukrainian Summer School, including testimonials by students who have benefited from it in past years.

St George's Cathedral, Lviv
St George’s Cathedral, Lviv

USFA, Ukrainian Engineers and Monash Helped Students Go Abroad

David’s and Aidan’s participation in the School was made possible by generous sponsors. The Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia Ltd., which has supported many Monash Ukrainian Studies projects, including the travel of numerous students to Lviv for the Summer School, once again contributed $2000 toward the costs incurred by each student.

A donation from the Ukrainian Society of Professional Engineers in Australia of just over $1800 helped Aidan and David cover the costs of tuition and residence. The Society, founded in 1954 in Sydney, served over many years as an information and mutual support network for engineers of Ukrainian background in Australia. It gave advice on the construction of Ukrainian community and religious buildings in Australia and maintained links with similar organisations in other countries of Ukrainian settlement. In the process of winding up its affairs and acting through its president, Mr Boris Sherban, the Society contacted the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies with the offer of contributing the funds in its accounts to a worthwhile educational project.

Aidan and David also benefited from the contribution that Monash University makes to the expenses of students travelling for study abroad.

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Petro Jacyk International Ukrainian Language Competition Results

Victorian participants in the 2013 Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition at Monash
Victorian participants in the 2013 Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition at Monash

On 1 June 2013 the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies at Monash University in collaboration with the Ukrainian Education Council of Australia conducted the Australian sector of the online Petro Jacyk International Ukrainian Language Competition.

Sixteen prizes, each of $200, were awarded. In the list below, where two student’s names appear under one age group, the first belongs to a winner who began learning Ukrainian in Australia and the second to a student who received at least part of her or his education in Ukraine:

Marko Rymovskyy (9), Sophiya Poshyvaylo-Towler (10), Alexandra Bernyk and Anna Neliubina (11), Daniel Kucheruk (12), Oksana Pashoulia and Roxanna Levkut (13), Andrew Bernyk and Bogdan Vlasyuk (14), Markian Stefanychyn and Dariya Vovnenko (15), Teresa Hassett and Olha Pokhmurska (16), and Maxim Nagorny and Anastasia Radievska (17).

David Priest, a student of Ukrainian at Monash, won the prize for university students.

Prizes were presented at the celebrations of Ukrainian Independence Day in Melbourne and Sydney in August.

Major sponsors of the competition were Dnister Ukrainian Credit Co-operative Ltd., the Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia Ltd., the Association of Ukrainian Women in Australia and Mr Cenko, a private donor.

Assessors of the Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition. Front: Orysia Stefyn, Yana Ostapenko (chair, competition committee), Valentyna Shapiro. Back: Svitlana Nagorny, Marko Pavlyshyn, Oksana Bobachko
Assessors of the Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition. Front: Orysia Stefyn, Yana Ostapenko (chair, competition committee), Valentyna Shapiro. Back: Svitlana Nagorny, Marko Pavlyshyn, Oksana Bobechko

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Eight Monash Rudewych Scholarships awarded in 2013

Award ceremony in Melbourne. From left: Monash prize winners David Priest and Adam Jartym; Monash Rudewych scholarship winners Teresa Hassett, Eva Paraskevakis, Jeremy Pryslak, Prof. Marko Pavlyshyn, Andriana Rudnytski, Ukrainian Education Council chair Ms Orysia Stefyn, Year 12 teacher Ms Tetiana Shchyrytsia. Obscured: Christine Verbovetski
Award ceremony in Melbourne. From left: Monash prize winners David Priest and Adam Jartym; Monash Rudewych scholarship winners Teresa Hassett, Eva Paraskevakis, Jeremy Pryslak, Prof. Marko Pavlyshyn, Andriana Rudnytski, Ukrainian Education Council chair Ms Orysia Stefyn, Year 12 teacher Ms Tetiana Shchyrytsia. Obscured: Christine Verbovetski

The month of March, and celebrations of the memory of Ukraine’s national poet Taras Shevchenko, have become associated in Melbourne and Sydney with the annual announcement of Australia’s most generous Ukrainian language awards: the Monash Rudewych Year 12 Ukrainian Language Scholarships.

In 2008 Mr Victor Rudewych and Ms Maria Rudewych, generous sponsors of many Ukrainian cultural activities in Australia, joined with Monash University to create a scholarship that would encourage young people to enrol for Year 12 Ukrainian in the states where this subject is available to matriculation level. The Scholarships, administered by the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies, are worth $2500 each. The scholarship selection committee, comprising representatives of Monash University and the Ukrainian Council of Education in Australia, may also grant Monash Rudewych Encouragement Awards where this is appropriate. The selection panel for the 2013 scholarships comprised Ms Valentyna Shapiro and the undersigned, both representing Monash, and Ms Orysia Stefyn, chair of UCEA.

In the five years up to 2012, eighteen young people from Victoria and New South Wales have received these scholarships or encouragement awards. For 2013, in order to increase the incentive to continue studying Ukrainian to Year 12, Victor and Maria Rudewych doubled the number of scholarships to eight. The total value of the scholarships and awards to date is $56,000, a remarkable testimony to the sponsors’ generosity.

The scholarship winners for 2013 received their award certificates and the first payment of their scholarship at the Shevchenko Day concerts in Sydney on 10 March and in Melbourne on 17 March.

The 2013 Monash Rudewych scholars in Victoria are Teresa Hassett, Eva Paraskevakis, Jeremy Pryslak, Andriana Rudnytski and Christine Verbovetski, all at the Metropolitan Andrei Sheptytsky Ukrainian Community School in North Melbourne. 

Award ceremony in Sydney. From left: Yevgeniya Podstreshna, Nazar Kucheruk, Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia chair Mr Mark Shumsky, Olha Pokhmurska
Award ceremony in Sydney. From left: Yevgeniya Podstreshna, Nazar Kucheruk, Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia chair Mr Mark Shumsky, Olha Pokhmurska

Their counterparts in New South Wales are Yevgeniya Podstreshna, Olha Pokhmurska and Ivan Kucheruk, all of whom study Ukrainian at the Strathfield campus of the Saturday School of Community Languages.

A special tribute is due to these excellent and promising students, who have every chance of making a valuable contribution to Ukrainian community life in the future. It is to be hoped that they will also avail themselves of the opportunity, after completing secondary school, of continuing their encounter with Ukrainian language and culture through the Ukrainian Studies program at Monash University, now available in the distance mode to university students at any Australian university.

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2014 Petro Jacyk International Ukrainian Language Competition Postponed

Australia-wide Competition 2014

Міжнародний конкурс з української мови ім. Петра Яцика в Австралії 2014 р.

As a result of the AvtoMaidan (car convoy) to Canberra and National Rally to be held on 24-25 May, the Jacyk competition in Australia for 2014 has been postponed.
http://ozeukes.com/events/ national-events/call-to- action-a-national-rally/

Further details regarding new date and time will be provided as soon as possible. We apologise for any inconvenience caused and thank you for your understanding.

Jacyk logo croppedTo read this post in Ukrainian, click here.

About the Competition

The goal of the competition is to promote the knowledge and use of the Ukrainian language among children and young people in Ukraine and throughout the world.

The Ukrainian language competition was established in 2000 with the support of the distinguished Canadian-Ukrainian philanthropist Petro Jacyk. In Ukraine the Competition is conducted by the League of Ukrainian Philanthropists.

The competition has now expanded to encompass more than 23 countries. Each year more than 5 million young people take part.

Victorian participants in the 2013 Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition at Monash
Victorian participants in the 2013 Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition at Monash

The Competition in Australia 2014

The Competition is conducted by the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies at Monash University and the Ukrainian Education Council of Australia (UECA).

Participation

Participants:

The Competition is open to all children and young people resident in Australia, whether or not they are enrolled in a formal Ukrainian-language course at a school or university.

Age of participants:

Between 9 and 21

Time:

Saturday 24 May 2014:  Postponed. Details to be advised.

  • 10.30 a.m. – 12.00 noon (Eastern States)
  • 10.00 a.m. – 11.30 a.m. (South Australia and Northern Territory)
  • 8.30 a.m. – 10.00 a.m. (Western Australia)

The Competition will be held on the same day and at the same time in all participating locations.

Venues:

  • Participants from Victoria: Monash University, Clayton Campus. Computer laboratories S306 and S310, Building 11, Monash University, Clayton Campus. Details will be advised on registration.
  • Participants from New South Wales: International Grammar School, 4-8 Kelly St, Ultimo.
  • Participants from South Australia: Findon Library, Findon Shopping Centre, Corner Findon and Grange Roads, Findon.
  • Participants from other states: details will be advised on registration.

Categories:

9 to 18 years of age: 10 groups based on age. Within each group there will be two categories:

  • participants who have received some formal schooling in Ukraine;
  • all other participants.

19 to 21 years old: 2 categories – beginners and advanced.

Winners and Prizes

All participants

Participation will be acknowledged by a Certificate of Participation.

Winners

Winners for each category in each year band will be announced. The participant in each category who receives the highest score will receive:

  • a Winner’s Certificate; and
  • a monetary prize ($200).

How to Enter

  and send the completed form to:

email: jacykcompetition.au@gmail.com
(signed forms will need to be scanned and sent as email attachments)

or to the following postal address:

Jacyk Competition

P.O. Box 8076

Dandenong VIC 3175

Entry deadline: Wednesday 7 May 2014.

Participation in the competition is free of charge

Further Information

If you have any queries or require further information, please email:

jacykcompetition.au@gmail.com

Become a fan of our FACEBOOK page and send an invitation to all your friends:

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Jacyk Ukrainian Language Competition in AU

Australian Federation of Ukrainian Organisations

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“Ukraine: Language, Culture, Identity” Conference

Conference coverOn 15-16 February 2013 the conference “Ukraine: Language, Culture, Identity” took place at Monash University. The conference was held under the joint auspices of the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies at Monash University, the Ukrainian Studies Association of Australia and the Shevchenko Scientific Society in Australia.

The conference attracted largest contingent of international Ukrainian Studies specialists hitherto assembled in Australia. Ukrainian universities and the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine were represented by four scholars. There were also four scholars from Canadian universities and one each from Italy and New Zealand. As expected, the largest number of papergivers ­ – eight – were based in Australia. 63 people attended the conference. There were eighteen presentations.

Publika pid chas konferentsii.2The diversity of the conference did not end here. It brought together experienced and well-known scholars with postgraduate students researching their PhD projects. Among the variety of scholarly disciplines represented were sociology and media studies, literary studies, linguistics, cultural studies and cultural history, medical anthropology, diaspora studies and memory studies.  Within this interdisciplinary space conference participants examined the identities of people in Ukraine and others who have a connection to Ukraine. They discussed identity shifts under the pressure of cultural and political forces, as well as the retention and evolution of identities.

Keynote: Volodymyr Kulyk

V. Kulyk in discussion
Yana Ostapenko and Volodymyr Kulyk

One of the conference’s keynote presentations, “Language and Identity in Post-Soviet Ukraine,” was delivered by Dr Volodymyr Kulyk (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), who at the time of the conference held a visiting fellowship at Harvard University. On the basis of extensive polls Dr Kulyk shed light on the growth in strength of the civic notion of Ukrainianness as a sense of belonging to a Ukrainian nation-state, and the corresponding decline of the view that Ukrainianness is inherent and defined by ethnos and culture. Among the fascinating and sometimes paradoxical phenomena that Dr Kulyk described was the identification Ukrainian as their native language by many respondents who made minimal use of Ukrainian in everyday life.

Keynote: Serhy Yekelchyk

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Serhy Yekelchyk

No less revealing of cultural realities in present-day Ukraine was the keynote address of Professor Serhy Yekelchyk (Victoria University, Canada), a former Visiting Scholar at Monash University. In his paper, “Memory Wars on the Silver Screen: Ukraine and Russia Look Back at the Second World War,” Professor Yekelchyk reported on the generally negative stereotypes of Ukrainians in war movies commissioned by the government of the Russian Federation or sponsored by oligarchs beholden to it. Such films characteristically fail at the box office, but are later broadcast on television, in Ukraine as well as in Russia, and are easily available over the internet. The weak Ukrainian film industry has not developed a recognisably Ukrainian vision of the Second World War. It remains an open question whether Mykhailo Il’ienko’s new film Firecrosser is able to fill this lacuna.

Literature and Culture

Olga Pressitch, Olena Haleta and Alessandro Achilli
Olga Pressitch, Olena Haleta and Alessandro Achilli

 

Dr Olena Haleta (Lviv National University), an invited guest of the conference, presented her conclusions from research into Ukrainian literary anthologies of recent decades. Dr Haleta interpreted this genre in its present form as a means for experimenting with new forms of cultural identity through combining and juxtaposing texts originally remote from one another.

The construction of identities through literary texts was a theme common to papers of scholars who inquired into the work of individual authors. Professor Natalia Pylypiuk (University of Alberta, Canada) considered the philosopher Hryhorii Skovoroda, Professor Oleh Ilnytzkyj – Mykola Hohol’ (or Nikolai Gogol’), Alessandro Achilli (University of Milan, Italy) ­– Vasyl’ Stus, and the undersigned – Marko Vovchok. Olga Pressitch (University of Victoria, Canada) analysed the popular Soviet film Chasing Two Hares and described the shift in the evaluation of Ukrainian identity markers when the film, shot in Ukrainian, was dubbed into Russian for release.

Ukraine Today

Natalya Sydorenko, Alla Boyko and Khrystyna Chushak
Natalya Sydorenko, Alla Boyko and Khrystyna Chushak

Several speakers examined the self-image of contemporary Ukrainians. Olga Oleinikova (University of Sydney) proposed a classification of citizens of Ukraine according to their choice of life strategy in the difficult circumstances of a society in economic transition. Khrystyna Chushak (Monash) analysed the image of the “homo sovieticus” in the discourse of Ukrainian intellectuals. Associate Professor Natalia Chaban (University of Canterbury, New Zealand) examined Ukrainian society’s views on the European Union and on Europeanness as an element of the self-definition of Ukrainians. Professor Chaban was unable to travel to Melbourne for the conference, and her paper was presented by Dr Eva Polonska-Kimunguyi (Monash).

Among the conference’s participants from Ukraine were members of the Institute of Journalism of Kyiv National University. Professor Alla Boyko gave a critical evaluation of the influence of contemporary religious media upon identity formation in Ukraine. Professor Natalya Sydorenko examined the role of the press in the shaping of national self-awareness in historical perspective and in the present day.

Ukrainians Abroad

Several presentations were concerned with the Ukrainian diaspora, in Australia in particular. Dr Halyna Koscharsky (Macquarie University) read a paper written in co-authorship with Dr Geoffrey Hull on the conservation in émigré communities, including that of Ukrainians in Australia, of language practices that in the linguistic mainstream have changed as a result of language standardisation.

Symon Kohut used the framework of research into bilingual education to reflect on his personal experience, where the father speaks with the child in Ukrainian only and the mother only in English. Yana Ostapenko (RMIT University) used Geert Hofstead’s reflections on cultural proximity and distance as a basis for conceptualising assimilation and cultural retention in Australia’s Ukrainian community.

Symon Kohut
Symon Kohut

Using literary and non-fictional texts by first-generation Ukrainian immigrants to Australia, Stephanie Prociw-Charalambous (Monash) demonstrated that the Ukrainian Community in Australia may be classified as a “diaspora” according to the terms of the definition proposed by William Safran. The audience was especially interested in the paper of Dr Victoria Team (Monash), who reported the results of research into the views of new immigrants from Ukraine to Australia on the relationship between diet and health. In this belief system pork fat (salo) plays a fascinating and at times peculiar role.

 

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Monash Ukrainian Studies in the City of Jazz

Panel
Taras Koznarsky, Yuliya Ilchuk, Roman Senkus (panel chairman) and Marko Pavlyshyn at their ASEEES panel

On 15-18 November 2012 Director of the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies Professor Marko Pavlyshyn participated in the 44th Annual Convention of the Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies in New Orleans, USA. The ASEES convention is one of the largest gatherings of scholars specialising in Slavic Studies, including Ukrainian Studies.

Professor Pavlyshyn convened one of the convention’s panels, which dealt with the contribution of literature and literary criticism to a Ukrainian national identity in the 1830s and 1840s. Professor Yuliya Ilchuk (Colgate University) considered the way in which simultaneous identification with both Ukrainian and Russian culture gave way to the necessity of choosing one or the other. Professor Taras Koznarsky (University of Toronto) re-examined the work of the influential Russian critic Vissarion Belinskii, arguing that the evolution of his views on literary writing in Ukrainian from acceptance to vehement rejection was part of the crystallisation of his conception of a Russian national literature. Professor Pavlyshyn examined the different visions of an audience for Ukrainian writing and writing about Ukraine in the works of the prose writer and dramatist Hryhorii Kvitka-Osnovianenko. The discussant for the panel was Professor George Grabowicz (Harvard University). Professor Pavlyshyn was also the designated discussant for the panel “The Language of Ukrainian Culture,” speakers at which were Olga Pressitch (Victoria University,Canada) and Roman Ivashkiv (University of Alberta).

Professor Pavlyshyn attended the meeting, within the ASEEES program, of the Ukrainian Studies Association of America, where he promoted the conference “Ukraine: Language, Culture, Identity,” which is to be held at Monash in February 2013.

He also conferred with Professor Serhii Plokhii about further stages in the editing of the publication based on the conference “Ukraine and Europe” (Gargnano, June 2011).

One of the participants in the ASEEES convention was Yuri Shevchuk, author of the textbook Beginner’s Ukrainian that is used by students of Ukrainian introductory.

French quarter
Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans, site of the ASEEES Convention

 

 

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Visit of Canadian Writer Myrna Kostash

Myrna Kostash and Khrystyna Chushak
Myrna Kostash and Monash Ukrainian Studies PhD Student Khrystyna Chushak

Myrna Kostash, the noted Canadian non-fiction author of Ukrainian background, met informally with Monash Ukrainian Studies people during her visit to Australia this November.

Ms Kostash is the author, among other books, of Prodigal Daughter: A Journey to Byzantium (2010), The Next Canada (2000) and, of special interest to adepts of Ukrainian Studies, Bloodlines: A Journey into Eastern Europe (1993), The Doomed Bridegroom (1998), which includes a remarkable personal response to the person and poetry of Vasyl’ Stus, and her early work on Ukrainian Canadians All of Baba’s Children (1977).

In Victoria Ms Kostash participated in the Artist-in-Residence Program at the Cowwarr Art Space in Gippsland.

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February 2013 conference: “Ukraine: Language, Culture, Identity”

 

On 15-16 February 2013 the conference “Ukraine: Language, Culture, Identity” will be held at Monash. Details, including forms for offers of papers and registration, are here.

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The Dr Anna Berehulak Memorial Scholarship

The Scholarship is funded by the Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia Ltd. And the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies, Monash University.

It is dedicated to the memory of Dr Anna Berehulak (1967-1999), a graduate of Monash University and the author of several publications on Ukrainian literature.

Its aim is to encourage students of Ukrainian literature in Australia to complete an Honours degree in Ukrainian Studies as a first step to graduate research in this discipline.

Preamble

Anna Stephanie Berehulak was born in Sydney, the eldest child of Ihor and Valentyna Berehulak, Ukrainians who had come to Australia as immigrants after the Second World War. Active in the Ukrainian community, Anna Berehulak attended Ukrainian Saturday school, took the Higher School Certificate in Ukrainian language, was a member of Plast, the Ukrainian scouting organisation, and sang in the Volodymyr Ivasiuk musical ensemble. She was a member of the Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia and donated part of her savings to the cause of Ukrainian Studies in Australia. While enrolled at the University of Sydney, she took the Ukrainian Studies course at Macquarie University.

In 1987 Anna Berehulak came to Monash University in Melbourne to specialise in Ukrainian literature.  In 1989 she took her B.A. with First Class Honours in the departments of Slavic Studies and Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies.  Her Honours thesis examined the treatment of landscape as a symbol of cultural displacement in the works of four contemporary women poets writing in Ukrainian outside Ukraine: Lidiia Daleka in Australia, Vira Vovk in Brazil, Emma Andiievs’ka in Germany, and Patricia Kylyna in the United States.

Anna Berehulak was awarded a Monash Graduate Scholarship and in 1995 completed her Ph.D. dissertation, “Colonial, Anti-Colonial and Post-Colonial Positions in the Ukrainian Historical Novel:  1934-1990.”  The degree was conferred in 1996.  The dissertation analysed Zinaida Tulub’s Liudolovy (Peoplehunters, 1934 and 1937), Roman Ivanychuk’s Mal’vy  (Hollyhocks, 1968), Pavlo Zahrebel’nyi’s Ia, Bohdan  (I, Bohdan, 1983)  and several novels by Valerii Shevchuk, including Try lystky za viknom  (Three Leaves Outside the Window, 1986). It studied the tension that is sometimes evident in literary works between compliance with an authoritarian political system and resistance to it. Anna Berehulak’s doctoral thesis and her six published articles and chapters mirrored her ethical concerns.  Her writing expressed solidarity with the weak, the subjected and the distressed: women, exiles, minorities, and victims of tyranny.

In 1993 Anna Berehulak was a Lecturer in Ukrainian Studies at Monash University.  At Monash she met Paul Wilkins, whom she married in 1996. In 1990 Anna Berehulak became a founding member of the Ukrainian Studies Association of Australia, joining its Committee in 1992.  In 1990 she attended, and spoke at, the First Congress of the International Association for Ukrainian Studies in Kyiv.

Anna Berehulak was diagnosed with lupus and died unexpectedly of this disease in 1999. Her premature death deprived Ukrainian Studies of a promising young scholar.

Terms

A maximum of one Scholarship will be awarded annually to a student enrolled for Honours or Combined Honours in the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies at Monash University.

The successful applicant for the Scholarship will complete an Honours thesis on a topic in Ukrainian literature or a related topic.

The value of the Scholarship will be $4000.

The Scholarship Certificate and a cheque to the value of the Scholarship will be presented at a suitable public occasion.

Applications

Each application will comprise:

  1. the applicant’s curriculum vitae;
  2. documentation showing results achieved by the applicant in his or her studies in all subjects, including Ukrainian Studies, at university;
  3. evidence of enrolment in Honours or Combined Honours in Ukrainian Studies at Monash University;
  4. a statement outlining the topic that the applicant proposes to research for his or her honours thesis. The statement should be prepared in both English and Ukrainian. Both texts may be up to 500 words in length.

Applications must be received by 31 January 2014 at the following address:

Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies
School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics
Building 11
Monash University, Victoria 3800

Selection Process

A committee comprising the director of the Mykola Zerov Centre for Ukrainian Studies, one other member of the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, and a person nominated by the Ukrainian Studies Foundation in Australia Ltd. will consider applications and announce the successful applicant. An award will be made only in the event that the preferred application is of sufficient merit.

Selection criteria will be the applicant’s academic record in Ukrainian Studies and overall, as well as the quality of the research proposal for the Honours thesis.

Eligibility

Australian citizens or permanent residents of Australia who are enrolled at Monash University for the Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Ukrainian Studies, or in a combined Honours degree program that includes Ukrainian Studies, are eligible to apply.

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