Conferral of Chin Communications Scholarships to Master of Interpreting and Translation students

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Prof. Charles Qin and Kate Ritchie, from Chin Communications, presented scholarships to the two best-performing students from the Chinese (Mandarin) – English stream from the first semester of the Monash University Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies program. The presentation of the scholarships to the two recipients, Ms Jingzi Li and Mr Jhen-Sheng Jhang, was made at the Inaugural Faculty of Arts Networking Event for Employers, Students and Researchers, held on Thursday 16 October 2014 at Monash University’s Caulfield Campus.

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Chin Communications is a highly-regarded and award-winning Chinese-English translation company that provides translation, interpreting, typesetting, social media and project management services. Chin Communications strongly supports the training and advancement of professional interpreters and translators through the Chin Communications Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies Scholarships that are awarded annually.

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Masters by Coursework

There are three streams within the Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies:

Translation only (February & July entry): offered for Chinese, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Russian and Spanish. (The following language streams are dependent on the number of enrolments and may not be offered every year: Korean, Russian and Spanish.)

Core units:
APG5875 – Introduction to interpreting and translation studies
APG5690 – Applied translation
APG5048 – Translation for special purposes

Capstone units:
APG5883 – Major translation project part 1
APG5884 – Major translation project part 2

Elective units:
APG5876 – Theoretical issues in literary and cultural translation
APG5707 – Special topic in languages, cultures and linguistics
APG5044 – Professional internship

Combined interpreting and translation (February entry): offered for Chinese, French,  Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Russian and Spanish. (The following language streams are dependent on the number of enrolments and may not be offered every year: Indonesian, Korean, Russian and Spanish.)

Core units:
APG5875 – Introduction to interpreting and translation studies
APG5049 – Theory and practice of interpreting
APG5690 – Applied translation
APG5691 – Intermediate interpreting
APG5048 – Translation for special purposes

Capstone unit:
APG5885 – Advanced interpreting

Conference interpreting and translation (February entry): offered for Chinese, French, Indonesian, Japanese and Spanish. NAATI accredited professional interpreters with three years of documented practice may be eligible for second semester (July) entry.

Core units:
APG5875 – Introduction to interpreting and translation studies
APG5049 – Theory and practice of interpreting
APG5690 – Applied translation
APG5691 – Intermediate interpreting
APG5874 – Practice of conference interpreting and translation

Capstone unit:
APG5616 – Conference interpreting

Students are expected to undertake professional internships/practicum as part of their degree. Through the internship students are able to pick up useful skills that help prepare them for the transition from university to work place. The internships provide a valuable networking opportunity for students and improve their graduate employability prospects.

Students may be eligible for NAATI accreditation on completion of the degree.

Further information on course structure is available via the Monash Handbook.

For entry requirements, fees and applications, see Coursefinder.

 

  • Double Degree Masters

    The objective of our Double Master Degrees is to train future translators and interpreters in two…

  • NAATI Accreditation

    NAATI Accreditation and Course Completion The Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies is approved by…

Linguists recognised by Indonesian government

Senior managers from Sekretariat Negara Republik Indonesia. L-R: Eko Harnowo, Syarif Hidayatullah, Indriawaty, Nurmeilawati and Conakry Marsono Yamtomo.
Senior managers from Sekretariat Negara Republik Indonesia. L-R: Eko Harnowo, Syarif Hidayatullah, Indriawaty, Nurmeilawati and Conakry Marsono Yamtomo.

International recognition of the calibre of Monash translation experts was demonstrated by a recent visit by senior Asian delegates.

Five senior managers from Indonesia’s Ministry of State Secretariat visited Monash as part of an interdisciplinary program on “Developing Translation and Interpreting Services in Indonesia”.

Supported by the Australian Government’s Australia Award Fellowship (AAF), they recently joined 20 fellows from across the Indonesian archipelago for a 10-week program at Monash.

The Ministry of State Secretariat offers technical and analytical support to the President and Vice-President of Indonesia. They are interested in linking the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics (SLLCL)’ capability in translation, interpretation and writing to Indonesia’s current needs.

This desire reflects a recent legal change which requires all official international engagement in Indonesia to be conducted in the Indonesian language. Indonesia currently lacks capacity in translation and interpreting, particularly in regional areas.

MSI program leader Dr Paul McShane said language offered a window to culture.

“It provides a basis for a shared understanding of Australian and Indonesian perspectives on sustainable development challenges,” he said. “MSI is happy to be a part of this important work.”

His views were echoed by SLLCL’s Associate Professor Rita Wilson.

“The recent high level visit from Indonesian officials reflects a successful program and a commitment to enduring collaboration with Monash University,” she said.

“The feedback and response from the visiting fellows was overwhelmingly positive. We were delighted to be involved in such a successful program and we look forward to ongoing engagement with Indonesia.”

A farewell for the 20 AAF fellows and the five senior officials from Indonesia was held in the newly renovated Monash Staff Club. The Acting Consul-General Government of Indonesia and the Victorian Deputy Director of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade attended, along with a number of Monash staff.

 

The Wheeler Centre Hot Desk Fellowships

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The Wheeler Centre Hot Desk Fellowships, sponsored by the Readings Foundation, offer merging writers across all genres support, as well as a place to work for two months. Louis Bravos, a sessional tutor in Japanese and Translation, has been chosen as one of the 2014 fellows, affording him an opportunity to work on his translation of Yukio Mishima’s novel Kyoko no Ie. The novel – one of only two of Mishima’s novels yet to be translated into English – is a complex, unsettling novel by one of the most controversial figures in Japanese literature. Set in Tokyo and New York in the 1950s, it is both international and intensely personal. Louis will begin his fellowship on September 29th.

 

New Double Master Degree with Kobe City University of Foreign Studies, Japan

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Monash University and Kobe City University of Foreign Studies are pleased to announce a new double master in Interpreting and Translation studies.

The course will start in 2015. It will provide training for future translators and interpreters working in the English-Japanese pair, and will be taught by academics and professional translators and interpreters from both institutions. Students will also undertake practical training with industry partners, providing them with key contacts and excellent opportunities for their future career. Selected students will spend the first year of study in Australia, followed by a year in Japan. In Australia, they will complete theoretical and practical units on interpreting and translation and participate in a 160-hour internship program. In Japan, they will complete units from either a conference interpreting or media interpreting stream as well as further translation units. On completion of both programs students will be awarded two distinct Master’s degrees.

For further information on the double master Monash University-Kobe City University of Foreign Studies, please contact Marc.Orlando@monash.edu (Translation and Interpreting Studies) or Shani.Tobias@monash.edu (Japanese Studies).

For more information on Monash double master degrees in T&I, please click here

 

Areas of research

Our researchers are nationally and internationally renowned and have published widely in the field. Within the fields of translation and interpreting, and intercultural studies, we supervise MA and PhD dissertations in various areas such as T&I education; roles and identity of T&I professionals; literatures and literary translation; migration, mobility and (self)-translation; intercultural communication; translation and creativity. For any related enquiries, please contact Dr Leah Gerber

 

Innovative Approaches to Translation and Interpreting Education

Research in this area focuses on new ways of understanding the education of translators and interpreters in the 21st century to better equip them for a career in a multi-faceted profession, both at a local and global level. Today’s T&I education revolves around the concept of training “practisearchers”, professionals who are both practitioners and researchers, and the concept of practice-led research. We are currently involved in several projects related to improving training methodology. These include the use of digital technology in interpreter training; the design of curricula in conference interpreting; the design of a new testing model for examinations held by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI), in collaboration with other universities; participation in a new international initiative on translation certification (TransCert Project). 

Key words: practice-led research, pedagogy, technology, cognitive training approaches, domain specific training 

Researchers: Marc Orlando, Jim Hlavac, Thomas Chase, Helen Tebble, Sarah Pasfield-Neofitou, Zhichang Xu

 

The Professional in the 21st Century

This cluster of research focuses on the new and changing roles of professional translators and interpreters. The attributes of today’s translators and interpreters include not only inter-lingual transfer skills, but cross-cultural expertise, a wide knowledge of processes across a range of technical fields, independent business and marketing skills, and the capacity to work individually or in teams for a variety of clients requiring language services. Members of our research cluster are closely associated with national and international organisations. Our researchers have recently worked with the Australian Institute for Interpreters and Translators (AUSIT) to produce a new Code of Ethics and Code of Conduct and as part of a research consortium that investigated the testing procedures for NAATI.

Key words: practice, identity, ethics, role-relationships, cross-cultural communication and conceptions of translating and interpreting in multilingual societies. Discourse of Interpreted Speech and Interpreting. Language and Social Categories in Translation and Interpreting

Researchers: Marc Orlando, Jim Hlavac, Jeremy Breaden, In Jung Cho, Helen Tebble, Adolfo Gentile

 

Intercultural Communication in Multilingual Settings

This cluster focuses on the discourse and pragmatic features of speech and text and how these are enacted or represented across different languages. For successful communication to occur in multilingual or multicultural settings, speakers (and writers) may use either their own language with translation/interpreting services or English (as an international language). An important aspect is not only expertise in translation/interpreting skills and language proficiency, but also the capacity to recognise, understand and negotiate the different discourse and pragmatic features that speakers (and writers) of different backgrounds use. Our researchers include the Director of the Language and Society Centre, the editor of the International Journal of Language and Culture, the co-editor of Cognitive Linguistic Studies in Cultural Contexts and authors of books on rhetoric and writing styles, cross-cultural communication and multilingualism. 

Key words: multilingual workplaces, discourse of interpreted speech and translated text, cross-cultural communication, international institutions, tourism, commerce, trade, media, journalism

Researchers: Jim Hlavac, Zhichang Xu, Farzad Sharifian, Nadine Normand-Marconnet, Howard Manns, Jeremy Breaden, Paul Thomas, Simon Musgrave

 

Migration, Mobility and (Self-)Translation

 This area of research focuses on the relationship between translation and migration, as well as on the role that language policies and politics play in intercultural relationships between migrant groups and both host and home countries. Translation, in this context, is rooted in the everyday practice of negotiating multiple languages (as users, self-translators, as well as recipients of translation), but its processes extend beyond linguistic expression to individual and collective performances of cultural identity. Monash is a key partner in the AHRC (UK) funded project Transnationalizing Modern Languages: Mobility, Identity and Translation in Modern Italian Cultures. Our research also focuses on the international circulation of texts, and the relationship between transnational/translingual writing practices and translation. Recent publications by staff include a special issue of the Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature (Dislocated Readings) and of the AALITRA Review (Translation/Transnation).

Researchers: Rita Wilson, Leah Gerber, Sarah McDonald, Susanna Scarparo, Paul Bowker, Robin Gerster

 

Literatures in Translation and Literary Translation

 We are one of the leading research groups in literary translation in Australia. This research cluster explores literary translation in the broadest sense, encompassing comparative studies of published translations, national literatures in translation, genre translation and reception. Our researchers recently completed the interdisciplinary project Windows on Australia: Perceptions In and Through Translation, which studied the reception and cultural exchange of translated Australian texts (from 1945 onwards) in five target countries/cultures, funded by CAL and the Australia Japan Foundation.

 Key words: Australian literature in translation, crime fiction in translation, children’s literature in translation, poetry translation, theatre translation and performativity, translation reception.

 Researchers: Shani Tobias, Stewart King, Harry Aveling, Brian Nelson, Felix Siddel, Benjamin Andreo, Ali Alizadeh, Leah Gerber, Rita Wilson

 

Translation and Creativity

 Monash offers a new PhD in Translation Studies which enables candidates to create an original piece of translation as well as a critical exegesis in a field of their choice. The importance of translation and creativity was explored by researchers Rita Wilson and Leah Gerber in their recent publication Creative Constraints (2012). The annual Monash Literary Translation Summer/Winter School actively fosters the interaction between creative writers and translators by bringing together internationally renowned writers and professional translators to collaborate with participants in producing a consensus translation. Recent guests include writers Carlo Lucarelli, Lorenzo Silva and Dominique Sylvain. Our researchers are also published translators and writers.

 Key words: author/translator, practice-led research, creative writing and translation, translating style

 Researchers: Harry Aveling, Ali Alizadeh, Leah Gerber, Brian Nelson, Marc Orlando, Rita Wilson

 

Research projects and grants

Over the last ten years our T&I researchers have been involved in various externally funded research projects. Grants have been awarded by organisations such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australia-Japan Foundation, the Victorian Multicultural Commission NAATI and the Copyright Agency Limited. A full list appears below:

 

  •  Transnationalizing Modern Languages (2013-ongoing/In collaboration with Warwick University)
  • Modes of Interpreting and Digital Pen Technology (2012-ongoing/Oncall Interpreters and Translators)
  •  Development of conceptual overview of a new model for NAATI standards, testing and assessment (2011-2012/NAATI)
  • Perceptions of Australia in Japan through translation (2010-2011/Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade)
  • Windows on Australia: Perceptions in and through Translation (2009-2010/Copyright Agency Limited)
  • Professional development for translators and interpreters in metropolitan and regional areas (2009-2010/Victorian Multicultural Commission)
  • Monash-Vicnet Translation and Technology Project (2007/Library Board of Victoria)
  • The current and future provision of language services to the culturally and linguistically diverse ageing population in Victoria (2007-2008/VITS Language Link)
  • Coordination and evaluation of basic interpreting skills training for potential interpreters in small and emerging community languages (2006-2007/Department of Immigration & Multicultural & Indigenous Affairs)
  • Where are they now? Employment and training outcomes of graduate students of T & I training courses in Victoria (2006/Dept. for Victorian Communities)
  •  Developing Basic Interpreting Skills Training for Potential Interpreters in Small and Emerging Community Languages (2005-2006/Department of Immigration & Multicultural & Indigenous Affairs)

 

 

  • Areas of research

    Our researchers are nationally and internationally renowned and have published widely in the field. Within…

Agreement between Translation and Interpreting Studies and The Melbourne French Theatre

The T&I Studies Program and the Melbourne French Theatre have just signed a student placement agreement which will provide French-English translator trainees with the opportunity to develop their skills in the field of Theatre Translation, and in particular in Surtitling.

MFT is one of the rare companies to stage plays in French and to use surtitles in English. Surtitles are generally used for opera and plays performed in a foreign language. Surtitling in the theatre is surely not an everyday phenomenon. The translation exercice is different to other types of translations and its complexity makes it an extremely interesting field of research and practice.

The MFT, founded in 1977, is a non-profit incorporated association under the patronage of the French Ambassador to Australia. It presents two plays a year and tours schools across Victoria, aiming at cross-fertilising Australian and French-speaking cultures through theatre.

MFT Logo July 2012 HiRes

 

 

 

Application for the Conference Interpreting Stream – 2015 Intake

The next student intake for the MITS Conference Interpreting stream will be in February 2015. The aptitude test will  be organised in May 2015. Further information will be posted on this page closer to the date.

This course is NAATI approved for accreditation at Conference Interpreter level and Professional Translator level. After an introductory semester to Translation and Interpreting Studies, students have to pass an aptitude test before they can follow specialised conference interpreting training.

Practitioners who are already NAATI-accredited at Professional level with at least three years of documented practice, and who want to upgrade their skills, are eligible to take the aptitude test and, if successful, to follow the training over two semesters.

For further information, you can also contact the course coordinator: Marc.Orlando@monash.edu

 

Marcus shares his experience at Chin Communications

Marcus Xiaokang Liu a recent graduate in the Masters of  Interpreting and Translation Studies is  excelling in his role with Chin Communications.    For students keen to find out how to earn a spot as part of the team at Chin …  Read more …

 

International Internship Agreement between Translation and Interpreting Studies and the SPC

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Monash Translation and Interpreting Studies is delighted to announce they have just signed a MoU with the SPC, The Secretariat of the Pacific Community, which will give students of the MITS the possibility to undertake an international internship.

The SPC, based in Noumea, New Caledonia, is an international organisation founded in 1947 that works in public health, geoscience, agriculture, forestry, water resources, disaster management, fisheries, education, statistics, transport, energy, human rights, gender, youth and culture to help Pacific Island people achieve sustainable development.

As the official working languages of the organisation are English and French, the internship will provide Monash Translation and Interpreting students, working in the French-English pair, with the opportunity to work with the SPC’s in-house translators and conference interpreters and gain a unique experience of the work of an international body involved in regional aid.

 

English subtitles of an Italian documentary provided by Translation and Interpreting Studies Students

L’Occupazione Cinese: Made in Prato, a documentary by Massimo Luconi, produced by D4 with Rai Cinema (in Italian with English subtitles) was screened on 29th October as part of the 6th Chinese in Prato & 4th Wenzhouese Diaspora Symposia held at the Monash Prato Centre on 29-30 October.

As part of the ongoing collaboration between Monash Translation and Interpreting Studies and the Monash Prato Centre, the English subtitles for the documentary were provided by Erika Padovan, Hannah Kirby and Nicola Ranson, all of whom are currently enrolled in the Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies.

 

Reflecting on the experience, this is what Erika said:

I am very grateful to the Monash Prato Centre and in particular to A/Prof Rita Wilson for giving me and two other translators-in-training the opportunity to participate in this exciting and highly creative subtitling project. 

Under the supervision of Andreu Pedró i Garcia, a specialist in audiovisual translation, I learnt the theory and the practical art of subtitling – including condensing, segmenting, simplifying – and mastered the use of specialised software, such as Subtitle Workshop and Jubler. I have gained precious knowledge about the craft of subtitling that theory alone could not have given me. 

Throughout the project, I liaised with the client in Italy on behalf of the team. This role gave me an understanding of what real-life translation project management is like. As a result, I feel confident about approaching new clients and managing future assignments in a professional way. 

It was a great privilege to collaborate with the Monash Prato Centre. And what a great addition to my portfolio!  

Hannah and Nicola added:  

It has been fascinating to discover the challenges and difficulties that are specific to the medium of subtitling. We have had the pleasure of collaborating with an expert in the field of subtitling, Andreu Pedró i Garcia. He has guided us through the processes of subtitling including the many specific conventions of software.  

We were in direct contact with the director Massimo Luconi so as to fully comprehend the content and message of the dialogue. Embarking on this project has not only been challenging but also rewarding.  

This project has inspired thoughts on future careers and study paths. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Rita Wilson and the staff of Monash Prato Centre for guiding us through this project.

 

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MITS students Nicola Ranson, Hannah Kirby and Erika Padovan with their supervisor Andreu Pedro i Garcia

 

New Double Master Degree with the University of Trieste, Italy

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Monash University and the Università degli Studi di Trieste (Trieste, Italy) are delighted to announce a new double master in Translation and Interpreting Studies

The course will start in 2014 and will provide training for future translators and interpreters working in the English-Italian pair, and a second foreign language, and will be taught by academics and professional translators and interpreters from both institutions. They will also undertake practical training with industry partners, providing them with key contacts and excellent opportunities for their future career. 

Selected students will spend the first year of study in Italy followed by a year in Australia. On completion of both academic programs, students will be awarded two distinct Master degrees. To be considered for selection into the program, Australian students must have completed a Bachelor’s degree with a major in Italian and a minor, or high proficiency, in a second foreign language (French, German or Spanish).

For further information on the application process for the Double Master Monash University-University of Trieste, please contact the course coordinator: Marc.Orlando@monash.edu

For more information on Monash other double master degrees in T&I, please click here.

 

 

Translation and Interpreting Studies sponsor the AUSIT Excellence Awards

 

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The AUSIT Excellence Awards and D-Day Expo in T&I will this year be held in Melbourne on November 16. The awards aim at encouraging best practice in T&I, professionalism, dedication to quality, innovation and outstanding contribution to the industry. Monash Translation and Interpreting Studies are sponsoring the event.

For more information please visit www.ausitawards.org

 

Four students from the MITS completed an internship for the international organisation ACAP

Four students from the Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies have recently completed a one week internship in Hobart, in the headquarters of the organisation ACAP, the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels. The three official working languages of this international organisation are English, French and Spanish, and the internship was an opportunity for the students to learn about the work of in-house translators.

Reflecting on their experience, this is what they said:

“Not only had I the chance to experience what it is like to work as a professional translator for an international organisation, but I also learned a lot about a fascinating field I was totally unfamiliar with.”

“As a translator, working in-house as a member of a team and applying the know-how acquired in the masters programme is a real-life test for assessing the progress made towards becoming a translator. 

This experience has allowed me to get a glimpse of the work for an international organization focused on the conservation of seabirds and of the challenges of using technical vocabulary involving fisheries work; conservation methods; international recommendations for conservation; statistical data analysis, etc.” 
 
“The practicum allowed us to apply the theories which we had learned in class as part of our strategy in translating documents, develop scientific and political vocabulary and knowledge, familiarize ourselves with the work of ACAP among that of other organisations, and furthermore deepen our understanding of the profession and of Translation as a field of study.” 
 
“From a translation perspective the experience gave me an appreciation for the linguistic complexities of international treaty texts. From a broader perspective, it showed me the work being done across continents, governments and a range of international organisations to help protect bird life.”
 
 
The Translation and Interpreting Studies section and the students are really grateful and thankful to ACAP, and in particular to its Executive Secretary Warren Papworth and its Science Officer Wieslawa Misiak, for such a wonderful opportunity.
 
 
 
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MITS Students Nutjaree Chamaplin, Suzie Guyétand, Ben Pryor and Axel Ramirez, with Warren Papworth and Wieslawa Misiak from ACAP.

 

Internships and Practicum

The internships and practicum component of the master’s course is aimed at helping students to gain real world experiences in the Translation and Interpreting industry and at developing further their employability. The component is a requirement for NAATI accreditation. By working with professionals in the industry and/or along side professionals who frequently use translators and interpreters, students will be able to pick up useful skills that will help prepare them for the transition from university to work place. In applying the knowledge acquired in the classroom, students are able to develop a better understanding of the way in which theory relates to practice.  Employers and industry partners participating in the practicum may also become a useful recruitment resource for graduates of the program.

The internships and practicum component aims to help students: 

  • to obtain practical experience of the Interpreting and/or Translating industry in Australia,
  • to draw conclusions about the way in which Translators and/or Interpreters operate and about the criteria and skills involved in a practical working environment,
  • to apply the principles and practice of Translating and/or Interpreting acquired in their study,
  • to demonstrate their skills to prospective employers,
  • to make decisions about their careers in Translating and/or Interpreting,
  • to reflect on the connection between theory and practice.

Practicum in translation will typically include (but is not limited to) activities such as: 

  • Participation in large translation projects in collaboration with Translation agencies/language service providers
  • Client liaison and other administrative/management tasks as required by agencies/language service providers
  • Translation of general promotional, informative, and other corporate documents sourced by, or in collaboration with, lecturers and language tutors
  • Translation of academic material as needed. 

Practicum in interpreting will typically include a range of activities, such as: 

  • Weekly attendance at (or block placement with) a language service provider/ a translation and interpreting agency / a Monash University internal partner 
  • Attendance at court sessions where interpreting services are required to observe court procedures and etiquette, as well as professional Interpreters operating in the court environment
  • Attendance at hospital interpreted sessions to observe healthcare procedure and professionals, as well as interpreters operating in a healthcare setting
  • Attendance at international conferences or meetings to observe international meetings procedure and conference interpreters operating in a conference setting.

All translation and interpretation activities provided during internships and practicum are undertaken under the supervision of NAATI accredited translators and interpreters.

 

RECENT INTERNSHIPS AND PRACTICUM UNDERTAKEN BY MONASH STUDENTS

at:

  • OnCall Translators and Interpreters, (project management and translation) – various languages
  • Chin Communications (project management and translation) – English and Mandarin
  • Polaron Language Services (project management and translation) – various languages
  • Northern Health  (interpreting) – various languages
  • Eastern Health (interpreting & translation) – various languages
  • The headquarters of the international organisation ACAP (Hobart, Tasmania) – English, French and Spanish  
  • The National Gallery of Victoria for the Napoleon Exhibition (translations) – English and French
  • The Alliance Française of Melbourne (translations) – English and French
  • The EFM (Ecole Française de Melbourne) (translations) – English and French

 

 

  • Short Courses

    Updated 15 December 2014 The Translation and Interpreting Studies program at Monash University is pleased to…

  • Literary Translation

    The Australian Association for Literary Translation (AALITRA) Monash University hosts The AALITRA Review, the online journal…

Translation and Interpreting Scholarship from Chin Communications

To recognize the importance of training translators and interpreters, Chin Communications have decided to reward excellence with a student scholarship, offered to support students undertaking Monash’s Master of Interpreting and Translation in Mandarin.

Find out more here 

 

 

Research Collaboration on Digital Pen Technology and Interpreting Practice

The Translation and Interpreting Studies Section has signed a research agreement with OnCall Interpreters and Translators.

 

Short Courses

Updated 15 December 2014

The Translation and Interpreting Studies program at Monash University is pleased to announce that a program of professional development short courses will be offered in Melbourne and regional Victoria from 2014 to 2016.

Full schedule of all upcoming professional development short courses for 2014 – 2016:

Melbourne (Caulfield/City) Geelong Ballarat Morwell Wodonga
Courses for experienced T + I practitioners
Legal Interpreting November-December 2014; May-June 2015 March-April 2015 February-March 2015
Health Interpreting October-November 2014; June-August 2015; February-March 2016 November 2015 November 2015
Mental Health Interpreting February-March 2015; November 2015 March 2016 February 2016
Education Interpreting July 2015
Translation and technology June 2015
Telephone and video-link interpreting June-July 2015
Road safety and driver interpreting August 2015
Simultaneous interpreting April 2016
Professional Strategies and Stress Management for Interpreters February 2015; March 2016
Courses for recently graduated or accredited practitioners
Orientation to T&I sector December 2014; December 2015
Courses for entry-level practitioners
Entry-level (community) September-October 2014; February-April 2015; September-October 2015; February-April 2016 September-October 2014 November 2014 April – May 2015 August 2015
Courses appropriate for all levels
Advanced Ethics Workshop December 2014; December 2015

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Please see below for details on upcoming professional development short courses:

Entry-level (Community) Interpreting

Melbourne (Caulfield Campus)

February – April 2015

About the course

This short course is intended for people with high-level language skills in English and in another language or languages. The short course is for people who have no previous formal training in interpreting but who have an interest in becoming an interpreter. The short course teaches the following skills: basic dialogue interpreting, introduction to ethics, competence in active listening, accurate repetition, memory retention and note-taking. The short course covers terminology and features of interpreting in the medical, legal and social security fields and also develops participants’ understanding of the professional role and responsibilities of interpreters in the Australian community, including socio-cultural aspects. This short course does not include NAATI accreditation. For trainees who are interested in gaining NAATI accreditation, further training and testing is required and this short course will provide information about how to gain this.

This course is supported by the Department of Premier and Cabinet, Victoria: http://www.multicultural.vic.gov.au/projects-and-initiatives/improving-language-services

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Duration

This course is held over eight weeknights and is 40 hours in duration. This includes 24 hours of face-to-face sessions and approximately 16 hours of online work and self-study.

Dates, times and venues:

Monday 23rd February, 6pm – 9pm    

Monday 2nd March, 6pm – 9pm    

Monday 9th March, 6pm – 9pm   

Monday 16th March, 6pm – 9pm    

Monday 23rd March, 6pm – 9pm    

Monday 30th March, 6pm – 9pm    

Monday 13th April, 6pm – 9pm    

Monday 20th April, 6pm – 9pm   

Venue Campus: Caulfield Campus, Monash University, 900 Dandenong Rd, Caulfield East 3145.

Please note that this venue is wheelchair accessible.

Fees / Bursaries (Scholarships) The fee for this short course is $660 (incl. GST). Payment will be required upon notification of acceptance. Payment can be made by credit card. Please refer to the application form for further information. There may be a limited number of bursaries available for this course that cover the full cost of the short course. If you wish to apply for a bursary, please see the application form below and complete the relevant section at the end of the application form in order for your application to be considered.

Target languages: Any

Application Process

Applicants for the ENTRY-LEVEL (COMMUNITY) INTERPRETING short course should have high-level language skills in English and another language or languages. Please complete the Application Form and attach your CV/resume.

For those who wish to apply for a bursary (scholarship), please make sure that you complete the last page of the application form which requests information from you about why you wish to apply for a bursary.

Please send your completed application form and CV/resume via email to:

arts-translation-studies-enquiries@monash.edu

or via post to the following address:

Professional Development Short Courses (Translation and Interpreting) Attn. Ms Jocelyne Mohamudally, Translation and Interpreting Studies, School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, Victoria, 3800

Telephone: (03) 9905 2223

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If you have an enquiry about short courses, please send an email to the following address: arts-translation-studies-enquiries@monash.edu or ring: (03) 9905 2223 or write to: Short Courses (Translation and Interpreting) Attn. Ms Jocelyne Mohamudally, Translation and Interpreting Studies, School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia

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Testimonials from trainees in previous courses:

Entry-level (Community) Interpreting

“The teaching was excellent. All of the highly professional lecturers delivered all the necessary information about this profession.”

“This course was very useful and enlightening.”

“I enjoyed all the program. In my first week, I felt that I may not be able to do the course, but during the second week, my confidence and ability had grown.”

“It was a very good programme and I enjoyed it a lot. And the thing that I enjoyed the most were the presentations from the teaching staff.”

“All of the activities have helped me develop my skills and knowledge.”

Health Interpreting

“Really it was fantastic. Everything was mailed to us in time and I really liked that any information we asked we got.”

“The resources were extremely useful.”

“Yes very helpful. Also they are handy references for future use. The links also provided opportunities to reflect on how other practitioners dealt/managed difficult situations.”

“Yes, the homework activities and the resources sent to us were useful for enhancing our knowledge about health interpreting and adding to my terminology lists.”

“The health glossary book and the articles given to us plus the online ethics assignment and the videos were very useful.”

“The interactions, group discussions were excellent. The scenarios helped me reflect on some challenges of an interpreter. Also it has been great hearing from classmates their personal interpreting/translating experiences.”

“I must say that the management of the programme was excellent and very interesting. And the people, full knowledge who were invited to share their valuable experience.”

“The variety of topics and settings that were discussed and the professional knowledge of the guest speakers.”

Legal Interpreting

“We met, listened and learnt a lot from respected and highly experienced lecturers. This professional development was a unique and enjoyable session regarding interpreting for me.”

“The interaction with a plethora of diverse professional figures, usually quite difficult to have access to (lawyers, police forces, RRT members, etc.).”

“All of the resources and activities were useful to know so that I can enhance my interpreting skills.”

Mental Health Interpreting

“One of the highlights of this course was the experience and knowledge the presenters have in the mental health field according to their professions.”

“This course allowed time for questions and answers to clarify issues and problems.”

“The presenters from different areas of the mental health setting – clinicians, neuropsychologists, torture victims counsellors – were excellent.”

Translation and Technology Short Course

“The hands on approach was spot on.”

“I mainly enjoyed the friendly and relaxed manner in which the instructor conducted the class, and the close attention she paid to our questions and difficulties.”    

Telephone and Video-link Interpreting

“The course is really good and informative. The crime trial via video-link was the best experience for me personally and professionally. There’s so much to learn and savour.  I’m so glad that I attended this course!”

 

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Double Degree Masters

The objective of our Double Master Degrees is to train future translators and interpreters in two different countries and institutions. On completion of a Double Master, students will graduate with two distinct degrees. Courses are taught collaboratively by academics and by professional translators and interpreters of both countries, and are based both on theory and practice. Students are fully immersed in two cultures, as they spend a full year in Australia and a full year at the overseas host institution and follow courses in both English and their second language (and a third language when applicable). The training, both academic and professional, is tailored to the requirements of this multi-faceted profession, at the crossroads between numerous professional fields.

Current Double Masters

With University Jean Moulin, Lyon, FRANCE  (Double master in Translation)

With Trieste University, Trieste, ITALY (Double master in Interpreting and Translation) 

With Kobe City University of Foreign Studies, JAPAN (Double master in Interpreting and Translation)

 

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Double master with Jean Moulin University, France.

This course is offered in translation-only. The English-to-French, French-to-English double degree offered by Monash University (Melbourne, Australia) and Jean Moulin University (Lyon, France), is the result of collaboration between Monash Translation and Interpreting Studies and Jean Moulin Faculty of Languages.

Eligible students spend the first year (2 semesters) in Australia, at Monash University, within the Translation and Interpreting Studies Program in the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics. The coursework of Translation and Interpreting Studies courses are aimed at providing qualifications for those wishing to pursue a career as professional translators and are approved by NAATI (National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters). Students enrol in 4 translation units, structured around core seminars (in English) for all students enrolled in the Master, and complemented by language-specific workshops (in this case English/French). Students spend the second year (2 semesters) in Lyon, France, where they undertake units within Jean Moulin University English Studies department (in both the Master of LCE – Langues et cultures étrangères – and the Master of LEA/Legal and business translation – Langues étrangères appliquées/Traduction juridique et commerciale) and write their master’s thesis in the second semester. This thesis is a ‘professional’ thesis written after undertaking an internship over several months within a translation agency.

 Throughout these two years, they will undertake practical training with practitioners and other representatives of this industry. This work experience should provide them with key contacts and excellent opportunities for their future careers. At the end of the course, on successful completion of both academic programs, students will be awarded two distinct master degrees.

More information about Jean Moulin University and the Double Master can be found here. For further information on the eligibility requirements or on the course curriculum of the English to French, French to English Double Master, please contact:

For Anglophone candidates: Monash University, Melbourne

Marc Orlando, Translation and Interpreting Studies: Marc.Orlando@monash.edu

For Francophone candidates: Jean Moulin University – Lyon III

Denis Jamet, Dean, Faculty of Languages : denis.jamet@univ-lyon3.fr

 

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Double master with University of Trieste, Italy

This double degree in interpreting and translation will provide training for future translators and interpreters working in the English-Italian pair, and a second foreign language, and will be taught by academics and professional translators and interpreters from both institutions. They will also undertake practical training with industry partners, providing them with key contacts and excellent opportunities for their future career.

Selected students will spend the first year of study in Italy, followed by a year in Australia. During these two years students will be trained as interpreters and translators, or as translators only, using a three language combination. On completion of both academic programs, students will be awarded two distinct Master degrees.

To be considered for selection into the program, Australian students must have completed a Bachelor’s degree with a major in Italian and a minor, or high proficiency, in a second foreign language (French, German or Spanish).

For further information on the application process for the Double Master Monash University-University of Trieste, please contact the course coordinator: Marc.Orlando@monash.edu

Information of the University of Trieste can be found here

 

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Double master with Kobe City University of Foreign Studies, Japan

This double degree in interpreting and translation will provide training for future translators and interpreters working in the English-Japanese pair, and will be taught by academics and professional translators and interpreters from both institutions. Students will also undertake practical training with industry partners, providing them with key contacts and excellent opportunities for their future career.

Selected students will spend the first year of study in Australia, followed by a year in Japan. In Australia, they will complete theoretical and practical units on interpreting and translation and participate in a 160-hour internship program. In Japan, they will complete units from either a conference interpreting or media interpreting stream as well as further translation units. They will also submit a translation or interpreting project involving independent research and analysis. On completion of both academic programs, students will be awarded two distinct Master degrees.

To be considered for selection into the program, Australian students must have completed a Bachelor’s degree with a major in Japanese, linguistics, literature or a cognate area.

For further information on the application process and the course curriculum, please contact Marc.Orlando@monash.edu (Translation and Interpreting Studies) and Shani.Tobias@monash.edu (Japanese Studies)

Information about KCUFS can be found here.

 

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