Events in 2018

Our official 2017 program of events has now wrapped up. You can read all about our recent international conference “Representing Infirmities” here

You can find information about many of our other past events here.

Planning is currently underway for our 2018 program of workshops, seminars and the 2018 Bill Kent Memorial Lecture. Keep an eye out on this page for up-to-date information as we develop our program. In the meantime, read on for more information about the 2018 conference sessions we have organised.

Renaissance Society of America New Orleans 2018

22–24 March 2018 
Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans USA 

Our scholars will be represented at four sessions at RSA 2018, speaking on several of the core Program themes: Magnificent architecture, violence and the body in the city, and mapping space, movement, and experience in the Renaissance city.

Virtue and Wonder: Magnificent Architecture in the Early Modern Period

Chair: Alessandro Metlica, Università degli Studi di Padova

Organisers: Nele De Raedt, Ghent University; and Anne-Françoise Morel, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

Putting Up a Pose: The Prince’s Magnificent Palace in Fifteenth-Century Italy
Nele De Raedt, Ghent University

The Magnificence of Rupestral Architecture in late-medieval Sicily
Kristen Streahle, Cornell University

The Lure of Grandeur: Timotheo Maffei’s Praise of Florence
Peter F. Howard, Monash University

Violence and the Body in the City: 1300–1650

Sponsor: Prato Consortium for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Organisers: Peter F. Howard, Monash University; and Jonathan Davies, University of Warwick

Chair: Peter F. Howard, Monash University

Geographies of Violence in Early Modern Pisa and Siena
Jonathan Davies, University of Warwick

Bodies of Evidence: Suspicious Death and Homicide in Early Modern Bologna
Colin S. Rose, Brock University

Selling Ballads about Execution and Death in the Urban Environment
Una McIlvenna, University of Melbourne

Mapping Space, Movement, and Experience: Living in the Renaissance City I

Sponsor: Prato Consortium for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Organisers: Nicholas Terpstra, University of Toronto; and Colin S. Rose, Brock University

Chair: Nicholas Terpstra, University of Toronto

Mapping the City’s Wealth: The Spatial Organization of Cortona’s First Catasto
Daniel Bornstein, Washington University in St. Louis

The Catasto Generale Toscano and the Geographic Information Systems for the Urban History of Florence
Gianluca Belli, University of Florence

Architectural Technologies of Segregation in Early Modern Venice
Saundra L. Weddle, Drury University

The Confined Space: The City Surveyors and the Social Definition of Boundaries
Anna Pomierny-Wasinska, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History in Warsaw

Mapping Space, Movement, and Experience: Living in the Renaissance City II

Sponsor: Prato Consortium for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Organisers: Nicholas Terpstra, University of Toronto; and Colin S. Rose, Brock University

Chair: Colin S. Rose, Brock University

Resurrecting Rome: Pirro Ligorio’s Egyptian all’antica Imagery in Reconstructions of Roman Space
Catharine T. Wallace, Temple University

Mapping Sculpture in Medici Gardens
Catherine Walsh, University of Montevallo

Mapping Alterity in Early Renaissance Venice: Spatial Experience in Bellini’s Saint Mark Preaching in Alexandria
Camilla Sponza, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München


International Medieval Congress Leeds 2018

2-5 July 2018
University of Leeds, Leeds UK.  

If you are coming to IMC Leeds, be sure to catch one or more of our four sessions, sponsored by the Prato Consortium for Medieval & Renaissance Studies.

Session 323: Remembering Holy Bodies in the 12th and 13th Centuries

2 July – 16.30-18.00

Chair: Peter Howard, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

Abstract: Linked to the Body in the City Project, this session explores the diverse and often political agendas evident in the memorialisation of particular medieval saints and their holy bodies: the struggle to control and direct the ideological power of the black Madonna of Le Puy for political ends; Hildegard of Bingen’s efforts to authoritatively embed her community in the local landscape and connect it to the life of the local saint, Rupert; and the mixed messages offered to the beguines of Marseille by the description of the public violence done to their foundress Douceline of Digne’s body, as recorded in her Vita

Owning the Madonna: The Madonna of Le Puy and Political Control, 1000-1200 
Mimi Petrakis, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

Lives of Saints and Landscapes: Strategic Uses of the Natural World in 12th-Century German Hagiography 
Hannah Ellen Skipworth, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

The Political Use of a Provençal Saint’s Body: Commemorating the Violence Done to Douceline of Digne, 1215-1274 
Jennifer Lord, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

Session 1047: Reputation, Emotion, and Remembering Death and Illness

Session Time: 4 July – 09.00-10.30

Chair: John Henderson, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London; School of Philosophy, History & International Studies, Monash University

Abstract: Serious illness and sudden or violent death were familiar aspects of medieval life, but how did people choose to remember such experiences? Linked to the Body in the City Project, the session draws on a variety of different sources from across the Middle Ages recording illness and death, including medical treatises, Coroners’ Rolls, and forms of religious commemoration. The papers explore how the messy experiences of illness and death, and the complex emotions of those involved, could be interpreted and turned into more formal accounts of events, suitable for permanent record.

Recording a Place of Emotions and Violence: Mapping the Coronial Deaths of Medieval Oxfordshire 
Annie Blachly, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

The Insania and Piety of Herimann of Nevers: Remembering a Mentally Ill Carolingian Bishop 
Rachel Stone, Department of History, King’s College London

Medical Memory of Sense and Emotion by Baverio de’Bonetti (d.1480): A Physician of Bologna 
Gordon Whyte, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

Session 1650: The Body Performed and Disciplined: Dominican Preaching On Penance in the City

Session Time: 5 July – 11.15-12.45

Chair: Holly Johnson, Department of English, Mississippi State University

Abstract: The Order of Preachers primarily preached within urban communities. As part of their foundation they were tasked with implementing the sacrament of penance through preaching and performing the methods of attaining salvation. As part of this, they used a variety of techniques within their sermons, including mnemonics in a literary and metaphorical sense, and material and visual media, to invoke fervour that would persuade the congregation to incorporate devotional practice that would lead them to salvation. Linked to the Body in the City Project, this session explores the different ways that the sacrament of penance was preached by Dominican friars from the 13th to 15th centuries.

The Preacher’s Narrative Body: Teaching Confession through Performance to the Community 
Anne Holloway, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

Whipping the Masses: The Discourse on Flagellation in de Bertis’s Public Sermons 
Stephanie Jury, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

Convertimini: Preaching and Penance in Renaissance Florence 
Peter Howard, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

Session 1737: The Meaning of Memories and Identities in Renaissance Florence

Session Time: 5 July – 14.15-15.45

Chair: John Henderson, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London; School of Philosophy, History & International Studies, Monash University

Abstract: Linked to the Body in the City Project, this session examines the motivations for recording the past in Renaissance Florence during the 15th and 16th centuries. The focus is on exploring the ‘why of memory’, the mentalities and motivations that drive individuals and groups to record their past, in forms of remembering such as vernacular chronicles, diaries, and papal records. The three papers will analyse case studies of papal, mercantile, and female monastic communities, together offering a more nuanced understanding of the interactions between past and present in the formation of identity, beliefs, and narratives.

‘I am very much indebted to this city’: The Papal Residencies and Florentine Memory in Leonardo Bruni’s Memoirs
Luke Bancroft, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University

Remembering Nuns: Miraculous Visions and the Narration of Spiritual Identity in Post-Tridentine Italy 
Rosa Martorana, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash UniversitY

The Prudence of Memory: Remembering the Past in 15th-Century Florence
Matthew Topp, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University