Members

 

 


Jay Ram Adhikari

Centre for Green Economy Development, Nepal.

Dr. Adhikari is an environmental policy expert having more than 20 years of experience in the areas of natural resource management and climate change. Mr. Adhikari served more than 20 years in the Government of Nepal and contributed in the development of environmental policy, strategy and guidelines. He also served three years (2013-2015) as a Bureau Member of the Intergovernmental Science Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). He received Developing Australian Capacity in South Asia (DACSA) Fellowship awarded by AusAID for the study of PhD at Murdoch University, WA. His research interest ranges from environmental policy and governance, political conflict and environmental governance, biodiversity, climate change adaptation and sustainable land management.

Areas of interest

Environment and climate change, Biodiversity policy, Environmental policy and governance.


Fatema Johera Ahmed

Monash University

Fatema Johera Ahmed is a MA (by Research) student in the Literary and Cultural Studies program at Monash University, Australia. Her thesis examines Aboriginal writings in the Australian context. Her research interest includes literature of the diaspora, postcolonial studies and Third World feminism. She also has a MA in English from BRAC University, Bangladesh, where her dissertation investigates race relations in African American writings. Her BA (Hons) in English is from Lady Shri Ram College for Women, University of Delhi.

Areas of interest

Literature of the diaspora, Postcolonial studies, Third World feminism, Life writings


Zahid Ahmed

Deakin University

Dr Zahid Shahab Ahmed is a researcher focusing on peace and security in South Asia. His previous work has focused on the challenges of war, violence and post-conflict in South Asia. A Pakistani citizen, Dr Ahmed brings a much needed citizen’s perspective to research on the country. He also brings rich grassroots level experience in the development sector in Asia to his research. His doctoral research had looked at regionalism and regional security in South Asia. In 2013, Ashgate Publishing Ltd published his following book: “Regionalism and Regional Security in South Asia: The Case of SAARC”.

Areas of interest

war, violence, trauma and post-conflict
national and collective memory and postcolonial era
regionalism and regional security in South Asia


Dr Veronica Aldous

Monash University

Nation(s) of interest: India

Areas of interest

Historical Vedic Studies including Vedanta Philosophy, Vastu and Ayurveda


Robyn Andrews

Massey University

Robyn Andrews is a Social Anthropologist at Massey University, New Zealand. She completed her PhD in 2005 based on ethnographic research with Kolkata’s Anglo-Indian community. She continues her research involvement with Anglo-Indians in India and the diaspora employing mainly ethnographic, narrative, and life story research methods. Her research focus has been on age care facilities, diaspora, migration, Christianity, pilgrimage, and Anglo-Indian experiences in ‘small towns’ of India, and most recently Anglo-Indian experiences in New Zealand.

In addition to her book, ‘Christmas in Calcutta: Anglo-Indian Stories and Essays’ (Sage 2014) she has published academic articles and book chapters, as well as articles in community publications. She is the co-editor of International Journal of Anglo-Indian Studies and regularly co-organises Anglo-Indian Studies workshops for scholars working in the area.

Areas of interest

Anglo-Indians, Migration, Diaspora, Christianity, Ageing (including culturally specific rest homes), Pilgrimage, Life Story collection, ethnography, urban ethnography


Deb Narayan Bandyopadhyay

Bankura University

Deb Narayan Bandyopadhyay is the Vice Chancellor, Bankura University, West Bengal, India. He was Professor in the Dept of English, Burdwan University, India. He is also the Secretary of the Indian Association for the Study of Australia (Eastern Region). In 2001 he lectured on “Nineteenth-century Representations of Shakespeare in India” at the University of Vienna, the Shakespeare Society of Vienna and the University of Salzburg. He also visited the University of Edinburgh and lectured at a seminar organised at Mansfield College, Oxford in 2002, with assistance from British Council. He was nominated for the Fulbright Exchange Summer Institute Program in 2003 and he worked at Northern Illinois University, University of Chicago and the State University of New York. He was awarded fellowships by the Australia-India Council in 2005 and 2006, and was a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Monash University (School of English, Co mmunication and Performance Studies) in 2007. He was the Visiting Research Fellow at the University of New South Wales ( School of History and Philosophy) in 2010-12. He is the Honorary Adjunct Senior Research Fellow at Monash University ( School of Journalism, Australian and Indigenous Studies: 2009- continuing). He has published and co-edited many scholarly books, and is the author of innumerable papers. He is also the international contributing editor of the Journal of American History (Indiana University, USA). He also edits the journal Australian Studies: Themes and Issues ( Centre for Australian Studies, Burdwan University). He worked on different projects in collaboration with University of Wollongong, University of New South Wales etc. Currently he works on a project “Trauma, Narratives and Ageing” funded by UKIERI (UK India Education and Research Initiative): 2014-2016.

Areas of interest

History, Narrative, Diaspora and Trauma Studies.


Daniel Bass

Cornell University

Daniel Bass is South Asia Program Manager at Cornell University. He received an M.A. in South Asian Studies at the University of Michigan, and then a Ph.D. in Anthropology (also at Michigan), with a dissertation on analyzing Tamil tea plantation workers in Sri Lanka as part of the Indian diaspora. This resulted in his first book, Everyday Ethnicity in Sri Lanka: Up-country Tamil Identity Politics (Routledge 2012). His second book, co-edited with Amarnath Amarasingam, Sri Lanka: The Struggle for Peace in the Aftermath of War, a multi-disciplinary analysis of post-war Sri Lanka, was published by Hurst in 2016.

Areas of interest

Tamils, Colonial Plantation Diasporas, Sri Lanka, India, citizenship, ethnicity, religion.


Ordan Andreevski

United Macedonian Diaspora

Ordan Andreevski was an Industry Partner as part of an ARC Linkage Project ‘Diasporas in Australia: Current and Potential Links with the Homeland’ involving Monash, Deakin, VU, UWA and Uni. of SA.

Areas of interest

Diaspora strategy and business practices.


Neeti Aryal Khanal

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Neeti Aryal Khanal is a PhD student in the School of Social Science at Monash University. Her current research investigates the linkages between Dalit women’s reproductive health and their experience of marginalization. She is a recipient of the Australia Awards Scholarship. Her expertise is based on Nepal on range of different issues relating to gender based violence, armed conflict, motherhood masculinity and disability studies. She is Lecturer at Tribhuvan University, Nepal and is now currently on study leave.

Areas of interest

Gender based violence, health inequalities, Disability, gender and armed conflict.


Shashikala Assella

University of Kelaniya / Independent

Shashikala Muthumal Assella works as a Lecturer (Visiting) at the Department of English, University of Kelaniya and holds a PhD on contemporary South Asian American women’s fiction from the University of Nottingham. Her research interests include studies on women’s writing, postcolonial fiction, diasporic literature and popular culture, especially from Asia. She has published in peer reviewed essay collections and presented at international conferences on South Asian diasporic women’s fiction.

Areas of interest

Diasporic women’s writing, Asian American women, Postcolonial literature, Sri Lankan writing in English, South Asian women in the diaspora.


Valérie-Anne Belleflamme

University of Liège

Besides her work as a graduate teaching assistant, Valérie-Anne Belleflamme is currently working on a doctoral dissertation on temporality and the craft of fiction in Gail Jones’s literary oeuvre at the University of Liège, Belgium. Her research interests are in postcolonial studies and Australian literature, as well as in narratology and phenomenology. She is also a member of CEREP (Centre d’Enseignement et de Recherche en Etudes Postcoloniales – Centre for Teaching and Research in Postcolonial Studies), the English Department’s research unit at the University of Liège.

Areas of interest

Colonial and postcolonial encounters, Australian literature, trauma and memory studies, phenomenology, narratology, migration, diaspora.


Faridullah Bezhan

Monash Asia Institute

Dr Faridullah Bezhan is a senior research fellow at Monash Asia Institute, Monash University Australia. He has published several books and articles in English and Persian on the politics, history and literature of Afghanistan, especially the work of the country’s prominent and emerging female authors, comparing their work before, during and after the period of Taliban rule. As well, he has published a number of books and articles on the political history of modern Afghanistan.

Areas of interest

War and literature, women and diaspora, diasporic literature, gender studies.


Stuti Bhatnagar

University of Adelaide

I am currently a Post-Graduate Research Student at the University of Adelaide in Australia. Additionally I am also the Post-Graduate Representative in the department of Politics and International Studies at Adelaide University. Before moving to Adelaide in 2014, I lived in the UAE and in New Delhi before that. I have a M. Phil degree in International Relations and a Masters in International Relations from the Jawaharlal Nehru University in Delhi. Prior to my move to the UAE, I worked with WISCOMP as Junior Program Officer from 2003-2007. I was very closely involved with the Conflict Transformation project and was handling the Scholars of Peace Research Fellowship programme. My PhD research at the University of Adelaide is focused on the role of Think Tanks in India and their influence on the Indo-Pak peacebuilding process.

Areas of interest

Indian foreign policy, peacebuilding, and conflict transformation.


Rima Bhattacharya

Monash University

Rima Bhattacharya is currently working as a PhD Research scholar at the Department of Humanities and Social Science in Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (IITK), India. She has completed her M.Phil Degree from the Department of English, University of Calcutta, India. She completed her M.A. in English literature from the Presidency College, University of Calcutta in 2010 and taught at a College (affiliated to Calcutta University) for two years as a lecturer. She Graduate with English Honours from Loreto College, Kolkata, India.

Areas of interest

Postcolonial studies, Diasporic literature, Diaspora and Violence, Chinese diaspora, American poetry, Post World War II Fictions, Children’s Literature, Indian writing in English. Expatriate and diasporic communities and collectives.


Nayana Bibile

University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Nayana’s research looks at the existential realities of migrant and refugee lives. Her current research delves deeper into normative and invisible violence of the everyday and gendered racism. Her doctoral thesis was entitled: “Cartographies of Resettlement: The Performativity of Containment and the Ontological Uncertainties of Certainty.” The thesis elaborates on ethical imagination, subjectivity and intersubjectivity to theorise ethnography from the interstices, which highlights processes that engender what she terms ‘compassionate condescension’ enacted in routine interactions of humanitarian regimes of care.

Areas of interest

Anthropology/Sociology, Gender/Subectivity & Intersectionality, Migration, Refugees & Mobility, Ethics, New Materialism, Theoretical aspects from a Foucauldian lens and Ethnography


Sarbojit Biswas

Bankura University

Sarbojit Biswas is Associate Professor of English at the School of Literature, Language and Culture Studies at Bankura University, West Bengal, India. He has been Visiting Research Fellow at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2010-2013 and is currently an awardee of UKIERI 2014 in collaboration with Swansea University, U.K. He is also engaged as International Research Project Fellow in a number of international research projects on areas like Waterways and Climate Change, Arsenic Mitigation, Gerontology, etc. He is also Project Director of ICSSR Research Project (Sponsored) 2016 – 2018 on Homeless Senior citizens in India.  His MPhil and Doctoral thesis was on the writings of indigenous Australian writer Kim Scott. Dr. Biswas is currently engaged in research on Gerontology Studies, Australian Studies, Scottish Studies, Environmental Studies, American Literature, etc.  He is author / editor of books like Language Analysis (2009), Indian English Fiction: A Reader (2009), Colonial Spectre and Beyond: Studies in Indian Writings in English (2011), History of Re-negotiation: Reading Kim Scott’s True Country, Benang and Kayang and Me (2013), Culture and Identity: Re-reading Raja Rao and Mulk Raj Anand (2014), Text and Theory: Reading and Re-readings (2014), Outside the British Canon: Reading Literatures from former European Colonies (2014), De-coding the Silence! Reading John Stuart Mill’s The Subjection of Women (2015).

Areas of interest

Diaspora Studies, Gerontology, Trauma Studies, and Environmental Studies.


Purushottama Bilimoria

Bilimoria Institution, UC Berkeley Center for South Asia Studies

Purushottama Bilimoria, Ph.D., has studied Philosophy, Sanskrit, Indian Religions, and Postcolonial stidies in India, Australia and Oxford. He is Editor of Sophia, Journal in Philosophy and Religion, and International Journal of Dharma Studies. He teaches and researches in Australia, India and United States and also publishes widely; but mostly importantly he thinks critically and is an engaged public intellectual.

Areas of interest

Indian and comparative philosophy, cross-cultural philosophy of religion, Indian ethics, Gandhi and global civil rights, Indian personal law and justice, diaspora studies (Australia and USA) and history of Indian performative art in Australia.


Shameem Black

Australian National University

Shameem Black received her PhD from Stanford University, served as an assistant professor of English at Yale University, and now teaches at the Australian National University. She is the author of Fiction Across Borders: Imagining the Lives of Others in Late Twentieth-Century Novels (Columbia University Press, 2010). Her research examines globalisation and the ethics of representation, with particular attention to the Indian diaspora and the role of English in Asia. Her work has appeared in A History of the Indian Novel in English (Cambridge, 2015), South Asia, Public Culture, Modern Fiction Studies, and other journals. Her current project examines the cultural politics of yoga.

Areas of interest

Literary and cultural studies of the Indian diaspora, the cultural politics of yoga, and ethics of representation.


Alison Booth

Auckland University of Technology

Alison Booth lectures in Tourism and Events at Auckland University of Technology specialising in event production and festival studies. Her PhD, Production Networks: Indian Cultural Production in Aotearoa/New Zealand, is from the University of Otago, Dunedin.

Recent publications include:
(2015) Producing Bollywood: Entrepreneurs and Sustainable Production Networks, World of Music (new series), 4 (1), 73–87.
Booth, A. (2015). Whose Diwali is it? Diaspora, Identity, and Festivalization. Tourism, Culture & Communication, 15(3), 215–226. doi:10.3727/109830415X14483038034209,
Booth, A. (2016). Ethnography in the Diaspora: Indian Cultural Production and Transnational Networks  In Pernecky, T. (Ed.).  Approaches and Methods in Event Studies. London, UK: Routledge        

Areas of interest

Festivals and cultural performance, event production practices, social sustainability, and cultural representation.


Matt Bostock

Monash University

Matt Bostock is an undergraduate studying a double degree (Bachelor of Commerce / Bachelor of Arts) at Monash University. He is a aspiring writer, theatre practitioner, and actor, who was born and raised in Singapore.

Areas of interest

Migration and indentured labour, health and diaspora, literature


Katherine Brabon

Monash University

I recently completed my PhD in Creative Writing at Monash University. My research work focuses on the relationship between landscape, trauma and memory as represented in literature. My debut novel The Memory Artist was published in 2016 and I am currently working on a second novel, set in Japan and inspired by my research interests. I tutor in Literary Studies and Creative Writing at Monash University.

Areas of interest

Migration and indentured labour, health and diaspora, literature


Jane Buckingham

University of Canterbury, Christchurch NZ

Jane Buckingham is associate Professor of History at university of Canterbury, Christchurch New Zealand. She has published in a range of fields including disability and medical history. She is currently part of a joint project on health, migration and labour – the history of Indian migration to Fiji.

Areas of interest

Migration and indentured labour, health and diaspora, literature


Isabel Carrera Suarez

University of Oviedo

Professor in English at the University of Oviedo, Spain, her research focuses on the intersections between gender and postcolonialism. She has published extensively in international journals and in collective volumes such as Tropes and Territories (2007), Reading(s) from a Distance (2008) and Metaphor and Diaspora in Contemporary Writing (2011). Coedited volumes include Post/Imperial Encounters (2005), Nación, diversidad y género (2010) and Reading Transcultural Cities (2011) and she has recently published ‘The Stranger Flâneuse and the Aesthetics of Pedestrianism: Writing the Post-diasporic Metropolis,’ (Interventions 17.6. 2015, 853-65). Her contribution to the Oxford History of the Novel in English. Vol. 12. (Ed. C. A. Howells, G. Turcotte, P. Sharrad) is forthcoming in 2017.

Areas of interest

Diasporic women writers


Shankari Chandran

Shankari Chandran was raised in Canberra, Australia. She spent a decade in London, working as a lawyer in the social justice field. She eventually returned home to Australia, where she now lives with her husband, four children and their cavoodle puppy. Her first novel, The Song of the Sun God, was published by Perera-Hussein in January 2017. It explores the recent history of Sri Lanka, the trauma of genocide and the healing power of family. Her second novel, The Barrier, will be published by Pan Macmillan Australia in June 2017. It is a literary thriller set in a world destroyed by disease and war. She is currently working on her third book, also set in Sri Lanka.

Areas of interest

Migration, the places and problems Tamils have left behind, and Sri Lankan politics and history.

Ajay Chaubey

National Institute of Technology, Uttarakhand, India.

Dr. Ajay K Chaubey is an Assistant Professor (English) at the Department of Sciences & Humanities, National Institute of Technology, Uttarakhand, India. His key publications include V S Naipaul (Atlantic, 2015), Salman Rushdie (Atlantic, 2016) followed by South Asian Diaspora (in three volumes) to be released by Rawat Publications, Jaipur (India) by the end of this year. Additionally, his critical essays, reviews and interviews have appeared in the TNL; Writers in Conversation (both from Australia); Confluence (London); Tuck Magazine (Canada) and in many Indian journals.

Areas of interest

Literature of South Asian Diaspora, Digital Humanities, Indian Literature, and Film Studies.


Joseph Cheer

Monash University

Joseph Cheer is currently a lecturer in the Graduate Tourism program and Director, Australia & International Tourism Research Unit (AITRU), National Centre for Australia Studies (NCAS), Faculty of Arts. He has also recently become a board member of the International Geography Union (IGU) Tourism Commission also know as Commission on the Geography of Tourism and Leisure and Global Change. See the following links for more:
http://profiles.arts.monash.edu.au/joseph-cheer/
https://monash.academia.edu/JosephCheer

Areas of interest

Tourism, cultural heritage, sustainable development, poverty alleviation, spiritual geographies, cultural anthropology, social justice, livelihoods.


Dr Adam Clulow

Monash University

Adam Clulow is a global historian whose work focuses especially on European interaction with Tokugawa Japan and the maritime history of early modern Asia.   He holds degrees from the University of Kwazulu-Natal in South Africa and Niigata University in Japan and received his PhD in East Asian History from Columbia University in 2008.  Clulow’s first book, The Company and the Shogun: The Dutch Encounter with Tokugawa Japan, was published by Columbia University Press in 2014.  It received multiple prizes including the Jerry Bentley Prize in World Historyfrom the American Historical Association and the W.K. Hancock Prize from the Australian Historical Association. He has published articles and chapters on a variety of topics including claims to possession, early modern piracy, the origins of international law (with Lauren Benton), Tokugawa period domains, Japanese merchants and mercenaries in Southeast Asia and the role of maritime violence in European expansion.  His work has appeared in the American Historical Review, Monumenta Nipponica, the Journal of World History, the Journal of Early Modern History, Itinerario and other publications.

Since 2015, Clulow has been engaged in a long-term collaboration with the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University to produce a teaching website devoted to the Amboyna conspiracy trial, a famous seventeenth century case involving Dutch officials, Japanese mercenaries and English merchants.

Clulow has received grants and awards from the Australian Research Council, Princeton University, the Japan Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.  He has been a visiting fellow at Vanderbilt University, Princeton University, the University of Tokyo and Cambridge University.  For further details, see his Academia.edu page and current CV: clulow-cv-december-2016

Areas of interest

Tokugawa Japan, Maritime History, Global History, History of the Dutch East India Company, Diplomacy


Craig Considine

Rice University

Dr. Craig Considine is a Catholic American of Irish and Italian descent. His first book – Islam, Race, and Pluralism in the Pakistani Diaspora, explores the politics of fear and the language of “us” and “them” between Pakistanis, Muslims, Americans, and the Irish. He currently serves as a faculty member of the Department of Sociology at Rice University. He holds a PhD from Trinity College Dublin, an MSc from the University of London, and a BA from American University in Washington, DC. Considine is a native of Needham, Massachusetts.

Areas of interest

Pakistani diaspora; Diaspora; Muslim diasporas, Intersection of religion, race, and national identity.


Ralph Crane

Western Sydney University

Ralph Crane is Professor of English and Academic Director International in the College of Arts, Law and Education at the University of Tasmania, Australia. He has published widely on colonial and postcolonial fictions, and has written or edited 22 books, including scholarly editions of several Anglo-Indian texts, and an edition of R.M. Ballantyne’s The Coral Island. His recent books include The Oxford History of the Novel in English, Vol 9, The World Novel in English to 1950 (co-edited with Jane Stafford and Mark Williams, 2016).

Areas of interest

Colonial and postcolonial fiction; Anglo-Indian (Raj) fiction; colonial adventure fiction; Indian crime fiction.


Pheroza Daruwalla

Western Sydney University

Pheroza Daruwalla is currently working on a PhD from the University of Sydney on Zoroastrianism, Diaspora and Pilgrimage. She is particularly interested in diasporic communities and their maintenance of customs, religion and rituals and how these contribute to identity.

Areas of interest

Diaspora,  Pilgrimage,  Zoroastrianism,  Indian Subcontinent


Arindam Das

Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata.

Dr Arindam Das (Assistant Prof. in the Dept of Humanities, Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India) has 12years of experience and more than 30 published papers at national and international levels (England, New York, Spain). Completed his Ph.D. in Australian Aboriginal Literature. He was a recipient of “Australia India Council Australian Studies Fellowship” in 2010-11. As a part of the programme he was a fellow at UNSW, Monash University, University of South Australia, University of Queensland, and Australian National University. He was fully funded by Monash University to deliver a paper at Australian Studies Conference, Monash University, Prato Centre, Italy.

Areas of interest

Anglo Indians of small Railway Towns of India, their migration to Australia, their re-negotiation and performitivity of their identity through various cultural artifacts; Colonial Advertisements of India and Australia: Issues of Gender, Nation, Iconography;National Jokes in Social Media: India and Australia as Case Studies.


Aditi Dasgupta

Jamia Millia Islamia

A published author of the Silencing of the Sirens, Aditi Dasgupta is pursuing PhD in womb literature: a study of select Indian texts from Jamia, New Delhi. Apart from managing her time in reading books extensively, she is also an entrepreneur, a closet poet and a mother. Issues of identity, body and body politics are some of the areas that interest her the most.

Areas of interest

Womb literature, abortion, birthing trauma, questioning the chora, womb vs vagina, and womb vs pleasure principe.


Ann David

University of Roehampton

Dr Ann R. David, Head of Depart. and Reader in Dance Studies at the University of Roehampton, specialises in dance anthropology and South Asian classical and popular dance. Trained in ballet and folk dance, as well as the Indian classical styles of bharatanatyam and kathak, she was a Research Fellow on an international project on religious migrants funded by Ford Foundation, USA. David contributes papers on dance, ritual, migration and the performance of identity at international conferences and has published widely in dance and other interdisciplinary journals. These include Dance Ethnography and Global Perspectives: Identity, Embodiment, and Culture (2013), as well as chapters in Performance and Ethnography: Dance, Drama, Music (2013), Summoning the Spirits: Possession and Invocation in Contemporary Religion (2010), and Dance Matters: Performing India (2010).

Areas of interest

Migration, colonial and post-colonial encounters, dance & performance, religious practice & ritual.


Ann David

University of Roehampton

Dr Ann R. David, Head of Depart. and Reader in Dance Studies at the University of Roehampton, specialises in dance anthropology and South Asian classical and popular dance. Trained in ballet and folk dance, as well as the Indian classical styles of bharatanatyam and kathak, she was a Research Fellow on an international project on religious migrants funded by Ford Foundation, USA. David contributes papers on dance, ritual, migration and the performance of identity at international conferences and has published widely in dance and other interdisciplinary journals. These include Dance Ethnography and Global Perspectives: Identity, Embodiment, and Culture (2013), as well as chapters in Performance and Ethnography: Dance, Drama, Music (2013), Summoning the Spirits: Possession and Invocation in Contemporary Religion (2010), and Dance Matters: Performing India (2010).

Areas of interest

Migration, colonial and post-colonial encounters, dance & performance, religious practice & ritual.


Lucio De Capitani

Ca’ Foscari University of Venice

Lucio De Capitani is a Ph.D. student in Modern Languages, Cultures and Societies at the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. His interests include colonial, postcolonial and world literatures (with a particular focus on anglophone South Asian literature), new theories of literary comparativism, and the connections between anthropology and literary studies. He has published papers on Amitav Ghosh, Anita Desai and Robert Louis Stevenson, and he also works as a theatre translator. His current research project involves the mapping of the anthropological imagination as registered by European and South Asian writers.

Areas of interest

Colonial, postcolonial and world literatures, especially anglophone South Asian literature; new theories of literary comparativism; anthropology.


Om Prakash Dwivedi

Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University

Om Prakash Dwivedi is Assistant Professor in English at Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, India. His areas of research include postcolonial theory and literature, Indian writing in English, and cultural studies. His recent publications include Indian Writing in English and the Global Literary Market (co-ed. with Lisa Lau), Human Rights in Postcolonial India (co ed. with V.G. Julie Rajan), Tracing the New Indian Diaspora (2014), and Postcolonial Theory in the Global Age (co-ed. with Martin Kich, 2013).

Areas of interest

postcolonial theory and literature, Indian Writing in English & Cultural Studies


Wendy Eikaas-Lee

University of Otago

Wendy Eikaas-Lee is currently pursuing her PhD in the Department of Music, University of Otago.   She is looking into the social and musical implication for the celebration of Nepalese festivals in Singapore. In addition, an educator in her field for more than 15 years, Wendy has taught at primary, secondary and professional levels. She believes teaching is one of the ways in which she shares her passion in Ethnomusicology.   

Areas of interest

Ethnography, Ethnomusicology, Festivity Music, Asian Music in Diaspora, Anthropology of music, Musical Instruments and Performing Arts.


Indika Fernando

Monash University

Indika Ferdinando is a Sri Lankan theatre practitioner and a film-maker. He has received a number of national awards for writing, directing, acting and music composition for theatre and several international awards for his début feature film. In 2002, he graduated with a first class honours degree in drama and theatre from the University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, where several years later, he read his M.Phil research. Indika is presently a senior lecturer at the University of the Visual and Performing Arts, Colombo. He is currently conducting his PhD research in Theatre at Monash University, Australia. 

Areas of interest

Transposing traditional theatre into contemporary practice, Sri Lankan ritual and folk theatre, sensory anthropology, non-linear narrative, minimalist theatre, multi-sensorial theatre, and directing theatre.


Srilal Fernando

University of New South Wales

Works as a Consultant in Psychiatry in private practise.Graduated as a medical doctor in Srilanka and completed professional examinations in the UK; Vice President of the Ceylon Society of Australia since it’s inception 15 yrs ago; Research into “Inception of Airmail services in Ceylon” and art of Donald Friend in Ceylon.

Areas of interest

Early Srilankan Art, architecture, history of air mail in Ceylon.


Helen Forbes-Mewett

Monash University

Dr Helen Forbes-Mewett is Senior Lecturer in Sociology and interdisciplinary researcher in the School of Social Sciences. Helen is also Research Associate of the Center on Violence at West Virginia University, US as well as a member of the Victorian Government Research Institute on Social Cohesion (RIOSC). Helen holds a BA (Psychology and Humanities), BA (Hons in Sociology, First Class) and PhD from Monash. Helen’s interdisciplinary work focuses on human security, migration, cultural diversity and social cohesion, spanning education, organisations, work and communities. Helen is coauthor of International Student Security and lead author of International Students and Crime.

Areas of interest

Migration, human security, cultural diversity, social cohesion, education.


Calvin Fung

Monash University

Calvin is currently pursuing a PhD in Creative Writing. His thesis includes a creative component in the form of a Gothic novel set in Hong Kong and a scholarly component examining the way in which the cultural specificity of Hong Kong interacts with the Gothic genre to extend the postcolonial Gothic and Asian Gothic spectra.

Areas of interest

Gothic literature, creative writing, postcolonial theory, feminist and queer theory, narratology, digital literatures.


Paul Giffard-Foret

La Sorbonne University, Paris.

Paul Giffard-Foret obtained his PhD in Anglophone postcolonial literatures from Monash University, in Australia, on the topic of Southeast Asian Australian women’s fiction. His thesis has appeared in various literary journals in the form of articles.

Paul’s research interests touch on a range of subjects, including Indian (Dalit) literatures in English, cultural translation, aesthetic theory, labor relations, terrorism, or political activism. Paul works as a sessional lecturer in English at La Sorbonne University, Paris, and is currently working on a book entitled “The Postcolonial Aesthete : Women’s Fiction from AustralAsia”.

Areas of interest

THEME 1:  Anglophone literatures (Australia, Southeast Asia, India) – postcolonial and feminist theories –  theories of translation and language (bilingualism and multiculturalism) – topical issues related  to migration, transnationalism, hybridity, globalization and cosmopolitanism. 
THEME 2:  Histories, cultures and economies of Asia-Pacific and Commonwealth nations – political and social  sciences – political philosophy (Deconstruction and Subaltern studies) – political economy  of the Global South – international relations – industrial relations and labor law.


Kaushik Ghosh

Bankura University

My PhD is on “rural poverty in coochbehar, west bengal (1999-2005): role of the non-governmental organisations”. I have published a number of articles on indian politics and society. After 12 years job tenure (2001-2014) in the university of north bengal (as a part-time teacher and full-time contractual assistant professor), I moved to hooghly women’s college, hooghly, west bengal, india. Since 2015 I have been working in the Bankura University as an assistant professor in the political science department.

Areas of interest

Indian society, politics, and rural development.


Ayan Guha

Bankura University

Ayan Guha is currently working as an Assistant Professor of Political Science in Bankura University, West Bengal. Presently, he is also a Doctoral Scholar at Dr. K.R. Narayanan Centre for Dalit and Minorities Studies, Jamia Milia Islamia, New Delhi. He has also acted in the Invitee Faculty at Administrative Training Institute (ATI), Kolkata and Diamond Harbour Women’s University, West Bengal. His previous research and teaching experience includes stint with Lok Sabha Secretariat, Parliament of India and N.P.R.M Government College, West Bengal. He has twice been offered Junior Research Fellowship by University Grants Commission (UGC), India.He has a number of publications to his credit. Some of his published papers have appeared in reputed journals and magazines such as Economic and Political Weekly, Mainstream, Frontier and World Focus. He is also working as a Co-Director of an ICSSR (Indian Council of Social Science Research Project) sponsored project on the situation of homeless elderly in India’s North-east region.

Areas of interest

Indian politics and society, politics of West Bengal, contemporary political and social theory, and gerentology


Roanna Gonsalves

UNSW

Roanna Gonsalves is an Indian Australian writer and academic. Her series of radio documentaries entitled On the tip of a billion tongues, (Earshot, ABC RN Nov-Dec 2015) is an acerbic socio-political portrayal of contemporary India through its multilingual writers. She received the Prime Minister’s Endeavour Award 2013, and is co-founder co-editor of Southern Crossings. Her book The Permanent Resident (UWAP, 2016 Forthcoming fiction) is a playfully lyrical work that speaks powerfully about the Indian diaspora in Australia. See http://roannagonsalves.com.au for more information.

Areas of interest

Literary studies, the sociology of literature, and selfie studies.


Samanthi Gunawardana

Monash University

Samanthi J. Gunawardana is a Lecturer in Gender and Development in the Faculty of Arts, and the Course Coordinator for the Master of International Development Practice. She has a PhD in Economics and Commerce from The University of Melbourne.

Samanthi’s research examines the impact of development policy on employment systems, labour, and livelihoods among rural women in South Asia, with a particular emphasis on gender, development and labour in Sri Lanka. Key topics explored include export processing zone employment systems, freedom of association, labour organizing, labour migration, and connections between the political economy of households and development policy in post conflict contexts.

Areas of interest

Gender, political economy in post-conflict contexts, labour and migration in the global economy


Aparna Halpe

Centennial College

Aparna Halpé is professor of English at Centennial College, Toronto. Prof. Halpé holds a doctorate in postcolonial literature from the Department of English and Centre For South Asian Studies, University of Toronto, and her research focuses on the function of myth in contemporary fiction from South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Caribbean. Prof. Halpé’s recent publications on Sri Lankan diasporic fiction and poetry have appeared in journals such as The University of Toronto Quarterley, Postcolonial Text and South Asian Review. She is the author of a collection of poems, Precarious (2013), and her most recent work on myth in Caribbean fiction will appear in Inteférances Litteraires (2016).

Areas of interest

Postcolonial approaches to myth criticism.


Kazi Haque

Asia Research Centre (ARC), Murdoch University

I am currently doing my PhD in Politics & International Studies at the Asia Research Centre (ARC) of Murdoch University. Earlier, I was Senior Lecturer/Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Governance Studies (IGS) of BRAC University and Policy Advisor of ActionAid. I am also Visiting Research Fellow at the Refugee and Migratory Movements Research Unit (RMMRU), based at the University of Dhaka. I have a number of publications on labour migration and diaspora which includes a book chapter, several working papers and research monographs, two policy briefs and an upcoming journal article.

Areas of interest

Diaspora politics, diaspora civil society.


Reza Haque

Islamic University

I teach English language, linguistics and literature in the Department of English at Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh. I received my PhD from Flinders University of South Australia. I co-edited “The Shadow of the Precursor” (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012) and have published internationally on Indian English fiction, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain and Hasan Azizul Huq. I am also a poet and Translations Editor for Transnational Literature.

Areas of interest

I am interested in postcolonial theory and literatures, English Romantic poetry, American poetry, Indian English fiction, historical fiction, and creative writing (poetry). My research interests also include critical theory, diasporic cultural studies (especially narratives), teaching English as a second language, global English, sociolinguistics, translation studies, and so on.


Rosanne Hawke

No affiliation

Rosanne Hawke is an author of over 25 books for young people. She lived in Pakistan and the UAE as an aid worker for ten years. Her books include the Mughal historical fantasy ‘The Tales of Jahani’, ‘Taj and the Great Camel Trek’, winner of the 2012 Adelaide Festival Awards for Children’s Literature, ‘Marrying Ameera’, ‘Mountain Wolf’ and ‘Soraya the Storyteller’, shortlisted in the CBCA awards. She is the 2015 recipient of the Nance Donkin Award, and an Asialink, Carclew, Varuna & May Gibbs fellow. She lecturers casually in Creative Writing at Tabor Adelaide.

Areas of interest

Children’s and young adult literature, displacement, bridging cultures, refugees, trafficking.


Preet Hiradhar

Lingnan University, Hong Kong.

Preet Hiradhar is an Assistant Professor at the Department of English at Lingnan University in Hong Kong. With a background in technology and writing in English as a Second Language (ESL) contexts and e-learning instructional design, her research and academic interests include technology-enhanced teaching and learning, digital practices, online literacies, and technology-mediated linguistic and cultural discourses. She has recently co-authored the second edition of Critical Reading and Writing in the Digital Age by Routledge and is currently working on a university-wide e-learning project for a language course.

Areas of interest

Digital practices, online literacies, and technology-mediated linguistic and cultural discourses, mutlimodality , digital diasporas.


Jaferi Husain

Monash University

I am doing my Masters in Communications and Media studies at Monash University Previously, I completed a Master of Development Studies from BRAC University in Bangladesh and a Bachelor of Science in Environment Management from Independent University Bangladesh.  

Prior to studying at Monash I worked in several local and international organizations such as the World Bank, BRAC University and UNICEF. The length of my professional experience has been about nine years and my portfolio of professional activities include strategic communications, research, writing reports, meeting  with government and NGO counterparts, helping disadvantaged local communities living in remote districts of Bangladesh as well as organizing international events.    

Areas of interest

Communication and media studies.


Shakira Hussein

The University of Melbourne

Areas of interest

Gendered and sexual encounters.

Gender, Muslim communities in Australia


Gidi Ifergan

Monash University

Doctor of philosophy (PhD). Published thesis: ‘The Man from Samyé: Longchenpa on Praxis, its Negation and Liberation’. The theme of negation of praxis and liberation within a non-dual system was already researched in Ifergan’s MA dissertation; The practical dimension is Śankara’s Vedānta. MA Studies in philosophy of religion were undertaken at the School of Philosophy, Program of Religious Studies, Tel-Aviv University, Israel. Major studies were in the area of Indian philosophy included Advaita Vedānta, yoga philosophy, Buddhism and advanced Sanskrit studies. To gain a broader view on religions, Ifergan also undertook minor studies on Judaism as part of these MA studies. Ifergan is currently engaged in writing on the psychological dimension of Hindu Yoga and Tibetan Dzogchen in reference to modern psychology, focusing on subliminal impressions (Saṃskāras).

Areas of interest

Indian Philosophy, Classic and Tibetan Buddhism, Yoga and Psychology, Advaita Vedanta, Dzogchen philosophy and practice, history of Tibet, French philosopher-Georges Bataille.


Sunita Iqbal

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Sunita Iqbal is serving as a program assistant in the Arts and Cultural Heritage program at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Ms. Iqbal previously worked as a legal assistant at Chanel, and has also served as the event and programming coordinator for Engendered, a New York and New Delhi-based transnational arts and human rights festival that presents contemporary multidisciplinary South Asian arts. She studied at Pace University, where she received a BA in sociology-anthropology with a minor in Middle Eastern studies. Ms. Iqbal holds an MPS in arts and cultural management from Pratt Institute as of May 2015.

Areas of interest

Intersectionality of South Asian diasporic arts


Subhash Jaireth

University of Canberra

Subhash Jaireth is a writer, poet and essayist. He has published poetry, fiction and nonfiction in Hindi, Russian and English. He has published three collections of poetry: Yashodhara: Six Seasons Without You (2003), Unfinished Poems for Your Violin (1996), and Golee Lagne Se Pahle (1994, in Hindi). His book, To Silence: Three Autobiographies, was published in 2011. His two plays plays adapted from the book were performed at Canberra’s Street Theatre in 2012. His novel, After Love, was released in 2012. My collection of short stories, Moments was published in 2015.

Areas of interest

Creative writing and translation


Pavithra Jayawardena

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

I am a PhD candidate in Victoria University of Wellington, in the area of migration. My research is on Diaspora’s citizenship and belonging, with focus to Sri Lankan Diaspora in New Zealand. By profession, I am a young female academic in the field of International Relations in the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka.

Areas of interest

Sri Lankan Diaspora, Migration, Citizenship, and Belonging.


Henry Johnson

University of Otago

Henry Johnson is Professor of Music and Associate Dean International (Humanities) at the University of Otago. He holds a doctorate from the University of Oxford, a masters degree from the University of London, and was an undergraduate student at Dartington College of Arts, where he took courses in Indian, Indonesian and Japanese music. His recent books include Recentring Asia, Cultural Transformations, and Performing Japan. He is a member of the “Asia-New Zealand Research Cluster”, Co-Director of the “Asian Migrations Research Theme”, and past President of the New Zealand Asian Studies Society.

Areas of interest

Asian migration and New Zealand  People and travel in Japan  Islands and colonization.


Demelza Jones

Aston University

I am a Lecturer in Sociology at Aston University, Birmingham, UK. My PhD (awarded by the University of Bristol in 2013) considered, through qualitative empirical work, the identification of Tamil migrants of diverse state backgrounds in the UK with the notion of a ‘Tamil diaspora’. Findings from this project have been published as articles in Religion, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Ethnicities and Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, and as a book chapter in the Ashgate collection ‘Dismantling Diasporas’. My current project examines the relationship between ‘mainstream’ Anglicanism and migrant or minority-ethnic led congregations in the superdiverse urban diocese of Birmingham.

Areas of interest

Expatriate and diasporic communities and collectives


Eva Jungbluth

Goethe University Frankfurt

Eva Jungbluth is a research assistant at the Institute for English and American Studies and the Department of New Anglophone Literatures and Cultures at Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany. She completed her M.A. in Literary and Cultural Studies and General Linguistics at the University of Wuppertal in 2009 and obtained her doctoral degree at Goethe University in 2015. In her doctoral thesis she has investigated narratives of migration and diaspora in novels, films, and graphic narratives. She is a participant of the Joint Award Ph.D. Programme between Goethe University (FB 10) and Monash University Melbourne (Faculty of Arts), where she spent a year as a visiting postgraduate researcher from August 2012 to July 2013.

Areas of interest

Transmedial and cultural narratologies, comic theory, theories of intermediality, media culture, diaspora studies, postcolonial theory, transcultural studies and memory studies.


Akshaya Kamalnath

Deakin University

I am a lawyer from India doing a PhD in Deakin University. I am interested in law and culture.

Areas of interest

Law.

Thaatchaayini Kananatu

Monash University Malaysia

Thaatchaayini Kananatu is a Lecturer in Law at the Department of Business Law and Taxation, School of Business, Monash University Malaysia. She holds an LLB (Hons) in Law, an LLM in International Law, and a PhD in Arts. Her doctoral research involved a socio-legal study of the mobilisation of Indians in Malaysia from the colonial period (1890s – 1956) to the post-colonial period (1957 – 2013). Her research interests include law and society, legal mobilisation, law and race, as well as colonial legal history.

Areas of interest

Law and society, legal mobilisation, law and race, and colonial legal history.


Shivani Kanodia

Monash University

Currently studying Masters of International Sustainable Tourism Management at Monash University.

Areas of interest

Sustainable Tourism, Tourism and Climate Change, Commumuty Development, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living.


Aashish Kaul

The University of Sydney

Aashish Kaul read law in India and literature in Australia, where he completed his doctoral studies at the University of Sydney. His work has appeared in publications in Australia, Britain, and the United States. He is the author of A Dream of Horses & Other Stories (2014) and The Queen’s Play (2015).

Areas of interest

Nineteenth & Twentieth Century Literature, Literary & Critical Theory, Creative Writing, Postcolonial Studies, Hybrid Narratives, Eastern Myths & Classical Texts


Manpreet Kaur

The University of Fiji

I am a Lecturer in Linguistics at The University of Fiji. As an early career academic, I have begun publishing a few scholarly articles in peer-reviewed journals. I have also published an anthology of poems titled: Echoes of my Footprints. I am actively engaged in research work, bidding for FHEC Grants and awarded six interdisciplinary research grants in the last three years. Also, I have presented and participated in a number of international conferences in Fiji and Australia. Recently, I was actively engaged in the International Conference to Commemorate the Centennial of the Abolition of Indian indentureship from 22nd to 25th March, 2017, held at the University of Fiji.

Areas of interest

Home, migration and the formation of new identity – South Asian Diasporic writers works studying themes of gender, mobility and the formation of new identity.


Gulandam Khan

University of Wollongong

Areas of interest

War, violence, trauma and post-conflict


Sukhmani Khorana

University of Wollongong

 

Areas of interest

Migration, refugees, citizenship.


Salim Lakha

University of Melbourne

I have multidisciplinary qualifications in economics, sociology, and anthropology. My research covers different themes of migration, including constructions of home among Indian migrants, experiences of Indian migrants in multicultural Melbourne (Australia), and the international migration of Indian IT professionals. My overarching interest is in how transnational subjects negotiate their identities in an increasingly globalized world. I am particularly interested in exploring the conditions and contexts under  which migration may give rise to the expression of a cosmopolitan ethic.

Areas of interest

Migration and cultural identity; multiculturalism; global diasporas; migration and  transnational workplaces; and auto-ethnography of migration.


Adrian McNeil

Monash University

Adrian McNeil is the author of Inventing the Sarod: A Cultural History, the most authoritative monograph on the instrument. He is a senior lecturer in ethnomusicology at the Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music, Monash University, Melbourne. He has published widely on his keen interests in the political economy and forms of traditional knowledge of Hindustani music. He is an internationally-known Indian classical music performer and studied sarod under Pt. Ashok Roy, Prof. Sachindra Nath Roy and Dr. Ashok Ranade. His recent intercultural cd, Improvisations, was a finalist for an ARIA in 2014.

Areas of interest

The political economy of music in South Asia, cultural nationalism, ethnomusicology,  social and cultural anthropology improvisatory practices in South Asian music.


Kama Maclean

University of New South Wales

Kama Maclean is Associate Professor of South Asian and World History at the University of New South Wales, and editor of South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies (2010-). She is the author of Pilgrimage and Power: the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad (New York, Oxford University Press 2008); the book was subsequently received an Honorable Mention in the Kentish Anand Coomaraswamy Prize, awarded by the Association of Asian Studies in the US. Her second book, A Revolutionary History of Interwar India: Violence, Image, Voice and Text was published in 2015 (New York: Oxford University Press/London: Hurst/ New Delhi: Penguin in 2016). She is currently completing a manuscript on the history of the Australia-India connections in the early twentieth century. Her paper comparing the Dictation Test and the exam for entrance to the Indian Civil Services was recently published in Postcolonial Studies, at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13688790.2015.1044483

Areas of interest

Indian settlers in Australia, early twentieth century.


Elizabeth Marshall

Multimedia University Malaysia

I am an academic in a Malaysian University. Interest areas are unearthing Indian histories in a certain locality of urban Kuala Lumpur. My mother and her contemporaries were taken from Kerala India in the 1940s and brought to Bamboo Garden, a little neighborhood in Kuala Lumpur where they re-build their lives around the Catholic church in the area. Much of the language, values and customes (food, celebration) from India was embedded in the lives of those in the neighbourhood. I am interested to capture the history of this community on record for the future generations, and for Malaysians as a whole.

Areas of interest

Collective memory


Rani Massey

Isabella Thoburn College – Lucknow, India

Head, Dept. of English, Isabellla Thoburn College, Lucknow, India ( retd.2015). Contributed also towards teaching Women’s Studies P.G.Officiated as Principal as and when required. Awarded UGC Minor project “Exploring the Dynamics of Gender Related Issues:Contemporary Women’s Writing in the SAARC Region(completed 2013).Publication:Impact of Globalization onn the Contemporary SAARC Women’s Writing (chapter in book) 2015. Several International papers published for the SAARC Journal and books, Foundation of SAARC Writers and Literature, Wing of Academy of Fine Arts and Lit. DPI status, UN.Panelist and Paper presentations in International SAARC Festivals organized by FOSWAL. Contributed toward Coffee Table Bk.College(2011) Editor-in-Chief college publications. Publication Ch; ‘Women and Resistance in Indo-Anglian Lit.”. International project culminating in Women’s Studies text bk.(India Volume), EWHA , Seoul.

Areas of interest

Engagement in research and projects. Contemporary SAARC women’s writings (S.Asian), including Diaspora. Projection of social dilemmas, conflict and violence, migration, refugee plight, cultural changes and challenges.


Sandhya Rao Mehta

Sultan Qaboos University, Oman.

I have worked extensively with the Indian community in Oman, adding to the literature of the Indian diaspora in the Arab Gulf. My focus continues to be the creation of homes within the context of the Arab world and the problematics of engendering the diaspora.

Areas of interest

Gender and diaspora, marginal diasporas in the Arab Gulf, Literature of the Indian Diaspora in the Arab Gulf.


Stefano Mercanti

University of Udine

Stefano Mercanti is Research Fellow at the University of Udine, Italy, where he is also a Member of the Partnership Studies Group (PSG), and Associate Editor of the online journal on modern literatures, Le Simplegadi. He has published widely on postcolonial literatures and partnership studies. Recent publications include: “The Rose and the Lotus. Partnership Studies in the Works of Raja Rao” (Rodopi, 2009) and, as co-editor, the volume “The Tapestry of the Creative Word in Anglophone Literatures” (Forum, 2013). He is the author of the partnership glossaries for Riane Eisler’s Italian editions of “The Chalice and the Blade” and “Sacred Pleasure”, and editor of the first Italian edition of Ashis Nandy’s “The Intimate Enemy” (Forum, 2014)..

Areas of interest

Indian English literature, South Asian Australian cultural production, Partnership Studies


Wendy Miller

University of Melbourne

Bachelor of Arts (politics/history), Deakin University; Master of Arts (Asian/Development Studies), Monash University; Diploma of Photoimaging, NMIT. Public relations, Department of Planning and Environment Victoria; Public relations, Consumer Affairs Department Victoria; Journalist; Indonesian language teacher, Department of Defence and Deakin University; Cross Cultural Communication Consultant, Managing Differences Business Consultancy; Publications Officer, Monash Asia Institute; Information Communication and Education Manager, Indonesia HIV/AIDS Care and Prevention Project, AusAID; Editor; Tutor (Australian Awards students), Development Studies, University of Melbourne. Fluent in Indonesian language. Strong interest in India.

Areas of interest

Public Health, politics, literature and creative writing, cross cultural communication, Islam, aid and development, Australia Asia relations.


Maryam Mirza

University of Liège

Maryam Mirza is a BeIPD-COFUND Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Liege. She received her PhD in English Studies from Aix-Marseille University and her work has been published in journals such as The Journal of Commonwealth Literature and Gender, Place & Culture. She is the author of a monograph entitled Intimate Class Acts: Friendship and Desire in Indian and Pakistani Women’s Fiction (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2016).

Areas of interest

Contemporary South Asian Anglophone literature, South Asian-Australian fiction, women’s writing and gender studies, economics and postcolonial literature, and sociology.


Tamanna Monem

University of Queensland

Narrative and performative strategies

Areas of interest

Innovative strategies to enhance participation for Australia and India businesses


Ruth Morgan

Monash University

Ruth is an environmental historian and historian of science, with a particular interest in Australia, the British Empire, and the Indian Ocean region. She is currently undertaking an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award focusing on the environmental exchanges between South Asia, the Australian colonies and the Cape Colony during the long nineteenth century.

She is a Research Fellow at the National Centre for Australian Studies, Faculty of Arts, Monash University.

Areas of interest

Environmental History
History of Science
Imperial networks of knowledge


Anuparna Mukherjee

The Australian National University

I am a researcher at The Australian National University. I have completed my graduation and Master Degree in English Literature from Presidency College, followed by an M.Phil from The English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad.

Areas of interest

Literatures of Indian Partition; Memory, Nostalgia and Trauma; South Asian Cities / City and Memory.


Benazir Mungloo

Monash University

I am a Bachelor of Arts student at Monash university, doing double majors in literary studies and media & communications plus a minor in french language. I am a fiction writer and poet from Mauritius. My writing journey started at the age of 16. I have been published in collections of short stories in Mauritius and have had some of my poems published in a few magazines. Notably enough, I am as well a former journalist. I was hired as a teenage journalist and collaborator by the Mauritian Sunday Times Newspaper at the age of 17. I am at the moment interning as a sponsorship officer at Monash Student Association (MSA). My current aim is to complete and publish my novel entitled “The Man I hardly Knew” which i have been writing for the past one year, exposing indian culture and traditions intertwined in a romantic genre. Last but not the least, I am an aspiring literature researcher.

Areas of interest

Feminism, post-colonial literatures, diaspora and trans-nationalism, gender, sexuality & violence-related studies, and media.


Delphine Munos

Goethe University/ University of Liège

I am currently a Humboldt Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of New Anglophone Literatures and Cultures at Goethe University Frankfurt. I have published in the fields of U.S. ethnic and postcolonial literatures, diaspora studies, and South Asian studies. Among my publications are a monograph on Jhumpa Lahiri (“After Melancholia: A Reappraisal of Second-Generation Diasporic Subjectivity in the Work of Jhumpa Lahiri” (Rodopi, 2013)) and ‘Mapping Diasporic Subjectivities’ (2014), a special issue of South Asian Diaspora that was guest-edited with Mala Pandurang. Forthcoming is “Minority Genres in Postcolonial Literatures” a special issue of the Journal of Postcolonial Writing that is guest-edited with Bénédicte Ledent and “Race Relations and the South Asian Diasporic Imaginary”, a special issue of South Asian Diaspora guest-edited with Mala Pandurang. My current research interests include the Indian Diaspora (old and new), postcolonial/diasporic literatures, memory studies and narratology.

Areas of interest

The Indian Diaspora (old and new), postcolonial/diasporic literatures, memory studies and narratology.


Rashida Murphy

Edith Cowan University

Rashida Murphy is an Adjunct Lecturer at Edith Cowan University. Her novel, The Historian’s Daughter, was shortlisted in the Dundee International Book Prize in 2015. It won ECU’s Magdalena Award for Feminist Writing and was published by UWA Publishing in 2016. Rashida’s short fiction and poetry has also been widely published and anthologised. She has been the CALD writer-in-residence at the Katherine Susannah Prichard Writers Centre in 2017 and is passionate about writing from a non-Eurocentric point of view. She is an experienced teacher and workshop presenter and is currently working on a new novel about feudal badlands and old churches.

Areas of interest

Migration, refugees, citizenship, personal and diasporic memory, trauma and postcolonial encounters.


Venkat Narayanan

RMIT

I have a broad ranging research interest in the role of accounting practices on various facets of society. While I work in the Business discipline (not in the Humanities) I believe my work has relevance beyond the business life-sphere. I am open to collaboration from researchers in other fields, particularly from music.

Areas of interest

Financialisation and its impacts of society, corporate responsibility and accountability, and Taxation as social practice.


John Napier

University of New South Wales

John Napier is a senior lecturer in Musicology at UNSW. His research includes North Indian classical music, traditional music of Rajasthan (monograph – “They Sing the Wedding of God”), the folk music of the Western Ghats, musicking in South Asian communities in Australia, and the influence of Indian music on Western composition. . He is an active performer of Western, Indian and intercultural music.

Areas of interest

South Asian diaspora and communities in Australia, narrative and performance.


Nadia Niaz

University of Melbourne

Nadia Niaz has a PhD in Creative Writing and Cultural Studies from the University of Melbourne where she teaches in the Creative Writing department. Her area of study is poetry and multilingual writing, and she has an interest in the politics of translation as well.

Areas of interest

Language use and multilingualism, constructions of identity, the idea of culture, interrogating belonging


Tricia Ong

Deakin University

I am a PhD Candidate at Deakin University/Australian Government “2015 Endeavour Research Fellow” who is undertaking a reproductive health study with women and girls who have been trafficked for sexual exploitation in Nepal (data collection complete). I designed a new visual/ tactile research method for my study. I have a “Master of Creative Arts Therapy” Degree and a Graduate Certificate in Business Management (Project Management).

Areas of interest

Reproductive health, visual/creative research methods, trafficked women and girls.


Nidhi Pandey

City of Melbourne

I have completed my Ph.D. on “European Environmental Policy 1987-2007”, from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India. I have even written several articles on Contemporary India. I have a five years of teaching experience in Delhi University. I used to taught Political Science and International Relations. I also used to teach in Indira Gandhi National Open University(IGNOU), New Delhi, India, Disaster Manangement to post- graduate students. I have written several articles on environment, state challenges, sustainability, indian constitution etc. Currently working with World Republics project of Government of India and one of the best director of hollywood Mr. Prakash Jha. I am also affiliated with the “Ganga Cleaning Project” of Government of India.

Areas of interest

Sustainability, European Studies, Indian Constitution and challenges, disaster management, International relations, Gender and environmental challenges, etc.


Mitra Pariyar

Macquarie University

Feb 2012 – Sep 2016: PhD in Sociology, Macquarie University.
Thesis: Overseas Caste among Military Migrants: The Migration and Settlement of Nepalese Gurkhas in Britain.
An inter-disciplinary dissertation including sociology, anthropology, colonial history.

2008 – 2010: MPhil in Antjropology, Oxford University.

Areas of interest

Nepal; Nepalese diaspora; diasporic caste; the caste system; Dalits; Gurkha soldiers; Nepalese migration to the UK


Maya Parmar

The Open University

SMaya Parmar is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in English Literature at The Open University. Her research explores strategies of cultural representation, memory making, and belonging amongst the South Asian diaspora. She has published her research in the journals Interventions (2015), South Asian Popular Culture (2014), and Atlantis (2013), and has guest co-edited the special issue ‘Re-evaluating the Postcolonial City: Production, Reconstruction, Representation’ for Interventions (2015). Additionally, Maya has an interest in working with audiences beyond the academy, and has led and collaborated on a number of public engagement projects.

Areas of interest

Cultural identity, encounters and cultural criss-crossings. Memory making amongst the South Asian diaspora, in particular amongst the Gujarati ‘double diaspora’ • The Indian Ocean and the migratory narratives manifested by, and within, this networked space • Postcolonial representations of cultural identity on evolving digital networks, and new media. • Visual materials, life-writing, and culinary practices in the articulation of loss and trauma amongst multiply-displaced communities • Interdisciplinary-led methodologies, and literary close readings, of forms of online memorialisation, and archiving, in the digital age.


Sreejata Paul

IITB-Monash Research Academy

Sreejata Paul completed her Bachelor’s (in 2012) and Master’s (in 2014) in English Literature from Jadavpur University, India. She earned her M. Phil. in English from Christ University, India, in 2016. Her M. Phil. dissertation was aimed at examining urban Indian women’s changing relationship with arranged marriage, as portrayed in Indian chick lit. She has presented a paper entitled “Gender-Sexuality as Performance in Post-Television Era Kitsch” at the National Queer Conference, 2013, in Kolkata, India. Currently she is pursuing a dual PhD at IIT-Bombay, India and Monash University, Australia. She is also a foodie, an avid traveller and amateur singer.

Areas of interest

Colonial Bengal, Muslim women in South Asia, Women writers, Gender Studies, Queer Studies, Literary Theory.


Ashwinee Pendharkar

University of Auckland and Victoria University of Wellington

Ashwinee Pendharkar has a PhD in Comparative literature and French from the University of Auckland and is specialising in Information studies and Archives management from Victoria University of Wellington. Her doctoral research analyses French translations of Indian English Literature and their role in mediating French reception of these texts. Her current research brings together the fields of Postcolonial studies and Archival studies with the aim to develop a more representative multicultural archival discourse that invites Migrant communities in the Host Nation’s National Archives to accord them visibility in the Host nation’s story and history.

Areas of interest

Global cultural hierarchies and Cross cultural reception of postcolonial literatures, hegemonic discourses and resistant practices, Collective memory and formation of the diasporic identity, Migrant community archives and host-diaspora relationship


Steve Pereira

University of Melbourne

Steve Pereira has over 20 years of experience in community engagement with a particular focus on culturally and linguistically diverse communities. Steve is one of the founders and directors of Toronto’s iconic Desh Pardesh Festival and worked as a producer and director with Theatre Fountainhead and Equity Theatre in Toronto.  In Melbourne he recently adapted, produced and directed an adaptation of Ocol p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol for the Big West Festival and runs the Sunshine Short Film Festival. He has written for The Toronto Star and for Boarderline and Metro magazines

Areas of interest

Colonialism and post-colonialism, diasporic identity and nationalism, performance and cinema studies, post-colonial literature with a focus on India and East Africa.


Nirukshi Perera

Monash University

I am a PhD student in the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics at Monash University.  My study is based in a Tamil Hindu temple in Australia.  I am interested in how the second generation uses language in the temple space as a way of interpreting and expressing their religious beliefs, cultures and identities.

Areas of interest

Languages and Linguistics  Tamil   Saivism in the diaspora  Hindu temples in Australia  Sri Lankan migration experiences  Sri Lankan diaspora


Anoma Pieris

The University of Melbourne

Anoma Pieris is an associate professor at the Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning. She is an architectural historian by training with a specialist focus on South and Southeast Asian architecture. Her interdisciplinary approach draws on history and geography. Her publications include, Architecture and Nationalism in Sri Lanka: The trouser under the cloth (Routledge 2012) and Hidden Hands and Divided Landscapes: a penal history of Singapore’s plural society (University of Hawaii Press 2009). Anoma is co-author with Janet McGaw of Assembling the Centre: Architecture for Indigenous Cultures. Australia and Beyond (Routledge 2014)

Areas of interest

Disciplines: Architecture, urbanism, geography, South and Southeast Asia, gender, postcolonial studies.

Topics

Indigenous place-making, nationalism, Pacific War, prisons, domesticity.


Nayantara Pothen

Western Sydney University

Dr Nayantara Pothen is the Senior Strategy and Projects Officer in the Office of the Vice-Chancellor at the University of Western Sydney. She has been in this role since 2014.

Prior to taking up her current role, she has taught South Asian history and culture, modern European history and Australian history, and has worked as a researcher at a number of universities in Sydney. She was awarded her PhD in History from the University of Sydney.

Her book on New Delhi social life in the 1930s and 1940s titled Glittering Decades: New Delhi in Love and War has been published by Penguin India in 2012. She has also contributed to an edited collection titled City Improbable: Writings on Delhi, edited by Khushwant Singh and published by Penguin India in 2010. In 2013/14, in collaboration with Katyayani Theatre Group (New Delhi), a stage adaptation of Glittering Decades was presented in New Delhi with plans for further productions in development.

Her current areas of research interest lie in the fields of:
*Socio-cultural history: research into imperialism as a cultural phenomenon in a South Asian context and its contemporary resonance; and
*the experiences of migration and multiculturalism in Italy, specifically through the lens of Indian migrant experience in Italy.

Areas of interest

Colonial Indian history, particularly of Delhi; social and cultural histories; Indian diasporic and migrant communities.


Noela Prasad

The Fred Hollows Foundation

A medical graduate from India, and subsequently specialising in Ophthalmology, (Christian Medical College, Vellore, India), I worked as a clinician initially in rural mission hospitals providing general medical and surgical care, and as teaching faculty and administrator of a Leprosy Hospital that was diversifying into non-leprosy care.

After 4 years of practicing as a ‘pure’ clinician, I went to LSHTM (UK) to study Community Eye Health, and from then on followed my passion in ‘public health ophthalmology’. Now am in a non-clinical, advisory role with The Fred Hollows Foundation since 2013.

Areas of interest

Eye Health access and equity; Prevention of Disability


Sanjaleen Prasad

University of Fiji

I am a lecturer in the Department of Language, Literature & Communication at The University of Fiji. I joined tertiary teaching following my studies at UniFiji where I completed a Master of Arts in Literature. I teach academic skills and literary studies. I have published scholarly papers in some international journals and have attended a number of local/international conferences. Currently I am working on research on ‘Parental Engagement for Literacy Achievement in Fiji Schools’. In addition, I’ve begun reading for my PhD on the topic of ‘Cruel Optimism as suggested in the fictions of South Asian writers’. I am also interested in gender studies and I teach a course on women’s writing. I am research active and have been awarded grants by the Higher Education Commission in Fiji and The University of Fiji for research work.

Areas of interest

My current research interest is cruel optimism related to migration basically. Why do people get cruelly optimistic and when are they able to recognize that their desires and longings may not be fulfilled. Another question I wish to research on is why do people stay attached to their desires and longings when it already has a problem attached to it? I am also involved in research on English Language teaching across the curriculum and parental involvement for literacy improvement in the Fijian Society.


Mary Purcell

University of Melbourne

I am currently a PHD candidate at Melbourne Graduate School of Education engaged in research on the topic of “The pedagogic possibilities of diasporic texts in a Contemporary Literature Classroom: A postcolonial analysis”. I am interested in the responses of upper secondary literature students to South Asian diasporic texts.

Areas of interest

 South Asian diasporic texts, postcolonial literature, postcolonial theory, Spivak


Gitanjali Pyndiah

Goldsmiths, University of London

Gitanjali Pyndiah is a doctoral researcher in Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, with interests in embodied histories and postcolonial literature and visual arts. Her research examines colonial ideologies and resistant creative practices in postcolonial contexts. She has a BA Visual Arts and a MA Arts Management. She also taught at the School of Fine Arts and worked at the Folk Museum of Indian immigration in Mauritius.

Areas of interest

Creative practices and decolonisation  Mother tongues and language dynamics  Diaspora, memory and identity


Mohammad Quayum

International Islamic University Malaysia, and Flinders University, Australia.

Mohammad A. Quayum has published 32 books and more than 100 articles in the areas of South and Southeast Asian Literature, Bengali Literature and Women’s Studies. He has taught at universities in Australia, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Singapore and the US. Founding Editor and Editor-in-Chief of Asiatic: An International Journal of Asian Literatures, Cultures and Englishes (indexed in Scopus, Thomson Reuters and MLA Annual International Bibliography), Quayum is on the advisory board of several leading journals in the field.

Areas of interest

Southeast Asian Literature, Bengali Literature, Mysticism in Literature, Gender Studies, Translation, South Asian Fiction, South Asian Diaspora Literature and Postcolonialism.


Arjun Raina

Flinders University

Arjun Raina is an Actor, Playwright and Kathakali performer of International repute having written and created original works of the theater which have been performed worldwide. (www.arjunraina.com).He is also a visiting Acting teacher at The National School of Drama, New Delhi, India. As India’s leading Voice and Accent coach he has written and published two books Speakeasy (Full Circle) and Speakright for a Call Center job (Penguin India).Arjun now lives and works in Australia. He is a practice based PhD Candidate at Flinders University, Adelaide working under the supervision of Dr.William Peterson. His research work is supported by the Flinders University Research Grant.

Areas of interest

Practice based research in contemporary actor training practices and traditional Kathakali performer training.


Lavanya Raj

Monash University

A psychologist who is currently undertaking Doctoral studies in Leadership and quality in higher education , I am deeply interested in researching and documenting the lives of Dalits, Adivasis and other Indigenous people. Towards this pursuit I have worked in two short films as the lead role and am also currently part of an Indian NGO which works in empowering the lives of the marginalized Dalits through education and art.

Areas of interest

Dalit, Adivasi and Indigenous life Leadership  


Christopher Raja

Author

Christopher Raja migrated to Melbourne from Kolkata in 1986, and now lives and works in Alice Springs. He is the co-author of the successful play The First Garden (Currency Press, 2012) and author of the acclaimed Young Adult novel, The Burning Elephant (Giramondo, 2015).

Areas of interest

Narrative and performative strategies


Helga Ramsey-Kurz

University of Innsbruck

I am Associate Professor of English literature at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. She has published articles on postcolonial literatures, edited such volumes as Uncommon Wealths in Postcolonial Fiction (forthcoming, 2017), On the Move: The Journey of Refugees in New Literatures in English (2012), Projections of Paradise: Ideal Elsewheres in Postcolonial Migrant Literature (2011), and is author of the monograph The Non-Literate Other: Readings of Illiteracy in Twentieth-Century Novels in English (2007). At present she is working on a book provisionally titled Hidden Treasures: Ways of Not Seeing Wealth, while organising a writing project with refugees from the Near and Middle East in Austria.

Areas of interest

Postcolonial literatures, migration, wealth creation and inequality, socioeconomic justice.


Reshmi Roy

Deakin University

Currently working with Deakin University as a sessional academic in the Education Faculty. Have also worked with Monash University. My PhD is in English (Univ. of Canterbury); M.A Hons (Gender Studies), M.A (Comparative Litt), B A.(English Major). My PhD thesis titled ‘Saptapadi’ (The Seven Steps) studied the urban Hindu marriage in South Asian Literature. I have published in the fields of South Asian literature, Cultural Studies, Education and Cross-cultural Management with a focus on South Asia. My current research focus are issues of identity, home and belonging focusing on Indian women migrants in particular.

Areas of interest

Indian migrant women, postcolonial encounters, cultural and social discourses within diasporas, issues of identity, belonging and home, domestic violence, marriage and gender issues as related to culture.


Pooja Sachdeva

Monash University

I am doing MA (Research) in Literary Studies at Monash University. Before joining Monash, I received my Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Literature from Punjabi University, India. My current study examines the representation of violence in Partition literature.

Areas of interest

South Asian Partition Literature, Gender based Violence, Ethics of Representation, Trauma and Memory, Anglo-Indian Literature, Indian Literature in English Translation, and Buddhist Studies.


Sharon Rundle

University of Technology Sydney

Sharon Rundle has published books, short stories, essays and articles. She has co-edited three Indo-Australian anthologies published in Australia and India: Only Connect: Short fiction about Technology and Us (2014); Alien Shores: Tales of Refugees and Asylum Seekers (2012); and Fear Factor Terror Incognito (2009 & 2010). She has completed doctoral research at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) into local production of published fiction by South Asian-Australian authors in Australia. Sharon writes a blog devoted to books and writing. She is Chair of the UTS Writers’ Alumni and commissioning editor of UTS Writers Connect. She has served on the Board of Directors of the NSW Writers’ Centre. She is a professional member of the Institute of Professional Editors, the Society of Editors NSW Inc., Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) and the Australian Society of Authors (ASA). She is a life member of the Indian Association for the Study of Australia and a founding member of Asia-Pacific Writers and Translators. Awards include a Commonwealth Broadcasting Association Short Story Prize; UTS Australian Postgraduate Award; UTS Alumni Award for Excellence; UTS SMSA medal and prize; and travel grants from UTS Vice-Chancellor’s Award, CAL Professional Development, and The Australia-India Council (AIC).

Areas of interest

Fiction by South Asian and South Asian-Australian writers. Books and publishing.


Natasha Kabir

Jahangirnagar University

Natasha Israt Kabir is a Freelance Researcher, Adjunct Lecturer at the department of Law and Justice, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka, Bangladesh, Charles Wallace Trust Fellow, U.K and U.S State Department alumni as well. She finished her Masters respectively from India and Bangladesh. Her 2nd Post-graduation was from the Pondicherry Central University, India and 1st one was from Jahangirnagar University based on South Asian Studies and International Relations. See: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=74303404&trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile,  Tweeter: kabirnatasha123,  http://kabirnatasha123.blogspot.com/ https://juniv.academia.edu/NatashaKabir

Areas of interest

Colonialism & nationalism in South Asia, peace and conflict resolution in South Asia, China in international politics, contemporary international relations, society, culture, economy of South Asia, research methodology, energy security in South Asia, environmental issues In South Asia, European integration, institutions, policies and programs, diaspora Study, government and politics in South Asia, contemporary issues in South Asia, South Asia in world affairs, regional cooperation in South Asia, foreign policy, and sociology of disaster management


R P Singh

Monash University

Dr. R. P. Singh is a Professor of English at the Department of English and Modern European Languages, University of Lucknow . He has widely published with national and International publishers. Besides his academic researches published in a dozen books, Professor Singh is an award winning playwright and poet too. His plays Flea Market and other Plays (2014), Ecologue (2014), When Brancho Flies (2014) , Shakespeare ki Saat Ratein (2015), Dugdhika (2014) and Kalateet aur Anya Naatak (2014) have received critical acclaim, and wide popularity. Patheya is a travelogue to his credit. “Banjaran: The Muse” (2008), “Cloud”, “Moon and a Little Girl” (2017), “Pathik and Pravah” (2016) and “Neeli Aankhon Wali Ladki” (2017) represent his poetry. He has contributed about 70 papers to journals and edited collections, and has presented the equal number in seminars and conferences. Prof. Singh has worked on different projects/ fellowships /and programmes of University Grants Commission, New Delhi, Indian Council of Cultural Relations, New Delhi, Indian Council for Social Science Research, New Delhi, Indian Council for Philosophical Research, New Delhi, Indian Institute of Advanced Studies, Shimla, F.M.S.H., Paris, France , and H.S.B, Budapest, Hungary.

Areas of interest

New Literatures in English , Ethnic studies, folklore etc.


Ali Saha

Monash University

Ms Saha is a PhD student in the School of Social and Political Science, Faculty of Arts, Monash University. She is originally from West Bengal, India and has completed her Bachelors and Masters (with Gold medal) in Advertising from Faculty of Visual Arts, Banaras Hindu University, India. Her current PhD research project looks into how the Dalit communities (lower caste people/ex-untouchables) in India, construct their identity in the present 21st century.

Areas of interest

Casteism and Social inequality, Media and Cultural studies, Conflicts, Indian Women, Indian Aesthetics and Advertising.


Jasmeet Kaur Sahi

RMIT

Jasmeet Kaur Sahi is a Melbourne-based writer and editor. She has written features and op-eds for the ABC, ArtsHub and Eureka Street. Her interests are in the arts, feminism, food, migration and social justice. She has a master’s in English Literature from the University of Hyderabad and a master’s in Creative Writing, Publishing & Editing from the University of Melbourne. She writes freelance and sessionally teaches undergrad nonfiction writing at RMIT. She tweets @JasmeetSahi and blogs at jasmeetsahi.wordpress.com.

Areas of interest

The arts, feminism, food, migration and social justice.


Anubha Sarkar

Monash University

Not wanting to be a frog in the well, I moved to the Netherlands to continue my further studies. Thereby my interdisciplinary educational background have equipped me with transferable analytical, writing and research skills. My education abroad particularly strengthened my intercultural communication and project management abilities. So I shine best in places where I can highlight my communication and research skills in full flair. Currently as a PhD researcher in Monash University, I am exploring the intersections between the film industry, cultural policy and creative economy.

Areas of interest

Media and creative economy, indigenous cultural production, Indian cinema, popular cultural studies.


Avijit Sarkar

I am a writer, musician and illustrator from Sydney, Australia. I am also the editor/publisher of the monthly e-zine “The Mind Creative” – a magazine about all things that fall under the umbrella of creativity. I have been writing prose and poetry for over 2 decades now and have written articles, essays and stories for local publications in Sydney. My first book “A Turn of Events” – a collection short stories – has been published recently by Ginninderra Press, Adelaide Hills.

Areas of interest

Writing, music, illustrating, and painting.


Pradip Sarkar

RMIT

I am an IT academic, but also pursue an artistic practice as a music producer and composer. The outlet is a live music outfit called Sikander, and consists of collaborations with musicians in Melbourne.

Areas of interest

The development of musical forms of cultural expression amongst the South Asian diaspora, such as Bhangra and Desi music in the UK, and Chutney Soca in Trinidad and Tobago.


Rajith Savanadasa

Novelist

Rajith Savanadasa was born in Sri Lanka and now lives in Melbourne. His first novel, Ruins, was published in 2016 and shortlisted for the Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction. Rajith also runs Open City Stories, an oral history project documenting the lives of asylum seekers in Melbourne, Australia. He is currently working on a second novel.

Areas of interest

Literature, post-colonial literature, war, violence and trauma, post-conflict reconciliation programs.


Sami Shah

Comedian and Writer

Comedian and Writer Sami Shah has been profiled in the New York Times and ABC’s The Australian Story, and appeared on BBC Radio 4, BBC Asian Network, TEDx, The Project, and the Soho Theatre.  Sami wrote and performed a 2-part series for BBC Radio 4 – “A BEGINNERS GUIDE TO PAKISTAN”, and appeared as a panelist on QI with Stephen Fry. Sami won the award for Best Local Act at the 2013 Perth International Comedy Festival, and Best WA Comedy at 2016 Fringe World.  His autobiography, “I, MIGRANT” has been nominated for the NSW Premier’s Literary Award, and the Russell Prize for Humour Writing. Sami produces a weekly podcast, “SAMI SAYS”. He has written columns for Fairfax Media, the Brisbane Courier Mail, SCOOP Magazine, and many other publications, and is a frequent contributor on ABC RN.  Sami is currently based in Melbourne, Australia.

Areas of interest

Immigration, history of Pakistan, and how to engage with culture through writing and comedy.


Quratulain Shirazi

International Islamic University Malaysia

I am a PhD student in department of English language and literature. I am specialising in literary studies. Previously I got a Masters in English literature from International Islamic university Malaysia and another from university of the Punjab, Pakistan. Currently, my research is related to the post colonial study of Selected Pakistani novels in English. I have published in refereed journals like Journal of Religion and Popular Culture and Annual of Urdu Studies

Areas of interest

Nation, nationalism, gender studies, diaspora, oral tradition, urdu literature, and literatures in English.


Chathurika Senanayake

Monash University

I completed my Bachelor of Arts (English Honours) Degree at the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka in 2010. I am currently reading for a Masters by Research in English at Monash University.

Areas of interest

Colonial and postcolonial literatures, and gender studies.


Kulam Shanmugam

Western University University (NSW)

I am a PhD student in the School of Education, UWS looking at the identity construction processes of Tamil immigrant children attending TamiSchools conducted on the weekends in Sydney. I have an MA-TESOL obtained in Scotland and have taught ESL in Sri Lanka and Papua New Guinea. I have also taught Tamil language to the immigrant children in Sydney.

Areas of interest

Identity construction processes of immigrants; language maintenance of immigrants.


Tanjina Sharmin

Monash University

I am a Bangladeshi Lawyer. I did my LLB from University of Dhaka, Master of Law from University of Cambridge, UK, and doing my PhD in International Economic Law at Monash University currently. Previously, I worked for UNDP Bangladesh on violence against women in Bangladesh. I am a lecturer of Law at BRAC University, Bangladesh and currently working as a Teaching Associate at Law School, Monash University, clayton campus.

Areas of interest

Constitutional rights of minorities and indigenous people in Bangladesh, Women’s rights and violence against women, war crimes, war crime trial in Bangladesh


Dr Seham Shwayli

Monash University

Region of interest: Middle East

Areas of interest

Migration and refugee studies, sociology of Education, Iraq, women in Iraq, Middle East, family issues and social life in diaspora, Iraq, social inclusion, multicultursim.


Pawan Singh

Deakin University

I earned a PhD in Communication from the University of California San Diego in 2015. My work examines the public mediation of claims to LGBT human rights, especially privacy and sexual personhood by activists and lawyers in India with respect to colonial sodomy laws. My research demonstrates a rethinking of the global emphasis on sexual visibility as a mode of empowerment in non-western contexts where the public and the private are not easily discerned. They remain fraught with other sensitivities and modes of identification that do not prioritize the sexual. Currently, I am a New Generation Network Scholar in the contemporary histories program at Deakin University and the Australia India Institute at the University of Melbourne. My proposed work will examine the uses of normativity in the battle to decriminalize homosexuality in India with a comparative focus on the broader Asia region.

Areas of interest

Media and cultural studies, gender and sexuality, postcolonial/area studies, human rights, and celebrity studies.


Supriya Singh

RMIT University

Supriya Singh is Professor, Sociology of Communications at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests cover money, migration and the transnational family; gender and financial inclusion; communication, globalization and money. Her latest books are Globalization and Money: A Global South Perspective (2013, Rowman & Littlefield) and The Girls Ate Last (2013, Angsana Publications). Her forthcoming book with Palgrave Macmillan is Money, Migration and Family: India to Australia. Supriya has also written Marriage Money: The Social Shaping of Money in Marriage and Banking (1997, Allen & Unwin); The Bankers: Australia’s Leading Bankers Talk About Banking Today (1991, Allen & Unwin); Bank Negara Malaysia: The First 25 years, 1959-1984 (1984, Bank Negara Malaysia) and On the Sulu Sea (1984, Angsana Publications).

Areas of interest

Money, migration and family


Priya Srinivasan

University of California, Riverside

Priya Srinivasan’s research uses critical feminist performance ethnography to
explore the inter-relations between migration, history, and laboring bodies. Using
the notion of “bodily archive” Srinivasan explores the labor of stories, histories,
and power sedimented on dancing bodies. Srinivasan’s first book “Sweating
Saris: Indian Dance as Transnational Labor” (Temple University ress, 2012),
seeks to understand dance as labor, and dancers not just as aesthetic bodies,
but as transnational migrant workers and wage earners who negotiate citizenship
and gender. Her current book project looks at contemporary artistic practices
in Netherlands and Australia and the historiography of South Asian migration in
these regions to question how a focus on performance can enable a rethinking of
neoliberalism, capitalism and national identity to re-map borders and shape the
cities in which migrants and refugees live.

Srinivasan obtained her first Class Honors from Monash in Ethnomusicology and went on to an MA in Dance Ethnography at UCLA, and a PhD in Performance Studies from Northwestern University. She was hired as the first South Asian Professor of Dance at the University of California, Riverside where she obtained tenure. She developed her hybrid talking dance lecture/performance based on her award winning book “Sweating Saris: Indian Dance as Transnational Labor” across the US in leading universities such as Harvard, Stanford, Northwestern and Berkeley.

She worked with the Indian Consul General of Shanghai to develop soft power approaches to cultural diplomacy through performance with Chinese artists and as a researcher at the International Institute for Asian Studies at Leiden University. She is currently based in Melbourne Australia.

Areas of interest

Performance Studies, Gender, Transnational Labor, Third World Feminist Theory, Postcolonial Theory, Diaspora Studies


Ruchira Talukdar

University of California, Riverside

Ruchira Talukdar is a Doctoral Candidate at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney. Whilst her thesis specifically compares discourses of environmental conflicts and movements in Australia and India, Ruchira’s broader area of interest lies in comparative environmental and climate change politics in the developed global North and the developing global South. Ruchira has spent ten years working on environmental movements in national and international NGOS in India and Australia. She holds a Masters in Environmental Studies from Melbourne University, and a Bachelors (Hons) in English Literature from New Delhi.

Areas of interest

Colonial and Postcolonial Encounters, Expatriate and Diasporic Communities and collectives, Personal, national and collective memory, experimental and avante garde movements, and narrative and performative strategies.


Prakash Subedi

Monash University

I am a Nepali academic/poet/writer currently living in Melbourne. My first book of poems, Stars and Fireflies, was published in 2009, and my second book, Six Strings, a joint anthology of poems with five other friends of mine, came out in 2011. My other publications include Ibsen: Beyond Time and Space and Ibsen: Samaya ra sandarbha, both casebooks on Henrik Ibsen. Starting with the establishment of Gurukul theatre in 2002, I have also closely worked with Nepali theatre as a writer, translator, editor, and promoter. My current work is related to Nepal’s encounter with the British empire and its long term impact, especially in the way it has shaped Nepali nationalism.

Areas of interest

South Asian literature and culture, Nepalese literature and aesthetics, translation, Buddhist studies, theatre and poetry.


Ms Amber Tan

Monash University

Nations of interest: Malaysia, Singapore.

Areas of interest

National Security, Anti-Terrorism, Constitutionalism, Civil and Political Rights, Constitutional Law


David Templeman

Monash Asia Institute

I worked with Tibetan refugees 1969-1972 in India and learned the beginnings of the language then. Thereafter I taught in Victorian high schools for 30 years while doing Tibetan historical text translation as a hobby. Since 2002 I have been associated with Monash University and have published several books and contributed 28 articles to journals in that period as well as supervising PhD students. At present I am translating the 1000 page Autobiography of the17th cent. Tibetan prelate Taranatha.

Areas of interest

Tibetan Political History, Tibetan textual history, Tibeto-Burman Language.


Nisha Thapliyal

University of Newcastle

Areas of interest

Expatriate and diasporic communities and collectives


Bhavya Tiwari

University of Houston

Assistant Professor, Sidho-Kanho-Birsha University, WB, India. Recipient of AIC Australian Studies Fellowship (2008). Visited Monash University, Australian National University, University of Adelaide and University of New South Wales. Worked on an archival research relating to Ned Kelly legend. Published extensively in National and International Journals. Currently engaged in serious research on South Asian diaspora.

Areas of interest

Diaspora studies and Australian studies


Onkarnath Upadhyay

University of Lucknow

Dr. Onkar Nath Upadhyay, presently working as Professor in the Department of English and Modern European Languages, Lucknow University, studied in Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi at B.A.( Hons.) in English, M.A. and Ph. D. degrees and subsequently taught at Govt. P.G. College, Kotdwar, Garhwal and K.S.Saket P.G. College, Faizabad. He has supervised 27 Ph.D. scholars and 8 scholars are working at present time with him. He has attended about 30 National and International level conferences and seminars. He has published two books such as Perspectives of Indian Diaspora and English Poetry of the Movement. His English Poetry of the Movement has been granted by the English and Foreign Language University, Hyderabad for wide circulation in all the libraries of Central Government. He delivered several lectures in Central/State Universities, Academic Institutions, and Academic Staff Colleges and chaired many sessions in the conferences. He has also worked on a major research project on Literature of Indian Diaspora in Mauritius and visited Mauritius in connection with the project. He also visited DePaul University, Chicago, USA to attend an International Conference. Dr. Upadhyay’s area of interest is the twentieth Century English Literature, Literary Criticism, Indian Literature in English and Diaspora Literature.

Areas of interest

Twentieth Century English Literature, Literary Criticism, Indian Literature in English and Diaspora Literature.


John Ubrzycki

University of New South Wales

John Zubrzycki is a Sydney-based author, journalist and researcher. He has a degree in South Asian history and Hindi from the Australian National University and has worked in India as a foreign correspondent, diplomat, consultant and tour guide. He is the author of two books: The Last Nizam: An Indian Prince in the Australian Outback, and The Mysterious Mr Jacob: Diamond Merchant, Magician and Spy, which was named one of the best books on India in 2012 by The Wall Street Journal. He is currently writing a history of Indian stage magic as part of a doctoral thesis at the University of New South Wales.

Areas of interest

Links between India and the West during the colonial period in the field of popular culture, particularly entertainment magic.


Alexandra Watkins

Monash University

Alexandra Watkins is an Adjunct Research Fellow and Teaching Associate in literary studies at Monash. Her research includes the South Asian diaspora, multiculturalism policy, Islamophobia, refugee identities, postcolonial fiction, and touristic literature. She has published Problematic Identities in Women’s Fiction of the Sri Lankan Diaspora (2015). Her work has appeared in Postcolonial Text, Journal of Postcolonial Writing, and Mascara Literary Review, and she has been a guest panelist on the Radio National “Subcontinental Bookclub Show”.

Areas of interest

Colonial and postcolonial encounters in fiction; migration, refugees, and citizenship.


Lushani Wewelwela Hewage

University of New South Wales

Originally from Sri Lanka, moved to Melbourne when I was 11 years old. I am completing my Bachelors in international development, starting my masters in international relations 2017. After completing a tour in Sri Lanka July 2016, Sri Lanka has become a very strong interest for me.

Areas of interest

International relations/development, post-war processes, women, war and peace, Sri Lanka, Nepal, India, South Asia.


Michelle Wright

Michelle Wright’s short stories have won several awards including The Age, Alan Marshall and Grace Marion Wilson. They have been published in many Australian and international anthologies and journals. In 2013 she was awarded a Writers Victoria Templeberg Fellowship and spent six weeks researching stories in Sri Lanka. In 2015 she was awarded a Faber Academy scholarship and Laughing Waters Residency. Her short story collection, Fine, was shortlisted for the Victorian Premier’s Award for an Unpublished Manuscript. It was published by Allen and Unwin in 2016, and will be followed by her debut novel in 2017.


Channa Wickremesekera

Wickremesekera was born in Sri Lanka in 1967. He obtained his PhD from Monash University in 1998. He is the author of three monographs on south Asian military history and five works of fiction dealing mainly with the experience of migrants in Australia. His research interests are in the fields of military history, insurgency and counter-insurgency and the experience of migrants and refugees.

Areas of interest

Military History, Migrants and refugees


Raj Yadav

Yadav’s interests include inter alia in (P)ostcolonial debate, especially the proliferation of social work from the west to the rest, and the need for localisation of social work. 

Areas of interest

Postcolonial debates, globalisation Vs localisation of social work, social work, and social development.