School of Social Sciences

  • Timor Sea maritime border dispute under the microscope d9766728dff2cdaccfdc1089dd5ecb23_nThe maritime boundaries dispute between Australia and Timor-Leste will be discussed by representatives from the Australian and Timor-Leste governments, and experts in international law at a public seminar in Melbourne next week co-hosted by Monash and Swinburne.
  • No prospect of release: Kevin Crump and the human rights implications of life imprisonment Kate-Fitz-GibbonKate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University and Wendy O’Brien, Deakin University A NSW court last week dismissed Kevin Crump’s latest appeal against his natural life sentence. Crump, who has served nearly 42 years in prison for murder, has been formally denied any prospect of a meaningful life outside prison walls. The decision provides a timely opportunity to reconsider the
  • Radio regular: Politics lecturer joins ABC Radio segment Zareh GhazarianDr Zareh Ghazarian, a lecturer from the School of Social Sciences, will feature in a new fortnightly segment to discuss national politics on ABC Radio. The regular appearance of Dr Ghazarian continues the strong tradition of Monash academics showcasing the teaching and research capabilities across the University. Dr Ghazarian himself is a familiar voice in Australian
  • Lacking a script, individuals drove the evolution of prime ministerial power australian flagsArticle by Paul Strangio, Monash University; James Walter, Monash University, and Paul ‘t Hart, Utrecht University The Australian Federation was established to address issues that seemed best resolved collectively rather than by each of the colonies acting alone (such as in defence), to co-ordinate activities that would benefit from uniformity (such as immigration and postal services), and
  • Sociology’s Dr Helen Forbes-Mewett awarded MPA Supervisor of the Year 2015 Dr Helen Forbes-MewittCongratulations to Dr Helen Forbes-Mewett who has been awarded the honour of MPA Supervisor of the Year for 2015. Each year, the Monash Postgraduate Association asks postgraduate students from all faculties to nominate an academic who they believe has made an outstanding contribution in the area of postgraduate supervision. At a ceremony held on 14 January 2016
  • To fight terrorism, Indonesia needs to move beyond security measures Noor Huda Ismail speaking at Tedx WanChaiNoor Huda Ismail Indonesian police have named a convicted terrorist, Afif Sunakim, as one of five perpetrators of Islamic State-linked bombings and shootings in Jakarta that killed eight people, including four attackers, last Thursday. Indonesia is considering amending its counter-terrorism laws to respond to the phenomenon of returned foreign fighters from Syria. But fighting terrorism purely through security
  • Q&A: why did terror hit Jakarta’s streets – and what happens next? Noor Huda Ismail speaking at Tedx WanChaiby Noor Huda Ismail, PhD candidate in the School of Social Sciences Explosions and gunfire on Thursday left seven people dead in Jakarta. The blasts and gunfight between Indonesian police and the suspected attackers took place near the busy Sarinah shopping mall in central Jakarta. Indonesian President Joko Widodo spoke of “acts of terror”. Five suspected attackers are reportedly
  • Explainer: what does the ‘male gaze’ mean, and what about a female gaze? Janice LoreckJanice Loreck The “gaze” is a term that describes how viewers engage with visual media. Originating in film theory and criticism in the 1970s, the gaze refers to how we look at visual representations. These include advertisements, television programs and cinema. When film critics talk about the gaze, they are often referring to the “male gaze”. But
  • Student ambassador in Myanmar: 2016 Colombo Plan scholar James Barklamb James Barklamb and Andrew Robb“The next few years in Myanmar promise to be a period of rapid development, democratisation and international engagement, and I am extremely fortunate and excited to be a part of this.”
  • The Psychology of Atomic Resistance: Monash’s Maria Rublee at Princeton seminar series M.V. Ramana, Frank von Hippel, Maria Rost Rublee and Zia MianMaria spoke to a group of about 25 Princeton academics, who were mainly nuclear physicists and nuclear engineers, on the topic of “The Psychology of Atomic Resistance.”
  • Mutated conventions: how secrecy in the name of security harms democracy Jude McCullochJude McCulloch (Monash Criminology) Secrecy is anathema to democracy. Without transparency, government may contravene its peoples’ values and violate human rights with impunity. Governments rarely declare themselves corrupt, confess to lies, or admit to participating or being complicit in crimes. They have many resources and connections at their disposal, including media, police, military and security agencies. This
  • Monash launches new Gender, Peace and Security Initiative Panellists at the launch of the Monash Gender, Peace and Security Initiative.On December 3, Monash proudly launched the new Gender Peace and Security Initiative, the first of its kind in Australia and the first such university initiative in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Sociology Honours student discusses research on ABC Radio artworks-000137858769-948qqj-t500x500-300x300Carley Fraser, who is doing Honours in Sociology this year, was recently interviewed by ABC Radio Far North during the TASA conference held in Cairns from November 23-26. Her research, supervised by Dr Jonathan Smith and based on the Our Lives project (a long-term study of young Queenslanders that started in 2006), looked at body modifications including
  • Launching the Monash Gender, Peace and Security Initiative: Towards Women’s Security Screen Shot 2015-11-24 at 10.13.48 amThe Centre for Women’s Studies and Gender Research presents a public lecture, Towards Women’s Security: Local and Global. The panel discussion will also act as the launch of the new Monash Gender, Peace and Security Initiative at Monash University. In the 21st Century, the persistence of violence against women in all its forms is a crucial
  • Why Australia must secure women’s safety as a national priority genderThe increasing regularity of fatal violence against women – 63 deaths so far this year –combined with harrowing tales from the Victorian Royal Commission, and this week’s Coroner’s Report on the tragic killing of Luke Batty gives flesh to the declaration of family violence as a ‘national emergency’. The Prime Minister’s announcement of increased funding and
  • Only the conscription referendums made Australia’s Great War experience different Ben WellingsBen Wellings November 11 resonates less with Australians than April 25. But Armistice Day provides a moment to reflect on Australia’s self-identity in comparison to other nations that experienced the first world war and commemorate it to this day. Nations exist in a perpetual state of creative tension. They must appear to be unique: that is the
  • Consuming Anzac: some thoughts on the Anzac centenary anzac the unauthorised biographyIf prizes were given out for the enthusiasm with which nations commemorate the centenary of the Great War, Australia would be first by a long shot. Dr Carolyn Holbrook looks at ‘Brandzac’.
  • Waging peace: women’s century-long campaign to end war continues Katrina Lee KooKatrina Lee-Koo and Sarah Boyd United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 turned 15 on October 31. The most notable of the worldwide celebrations was in New York, where representatives of UN member countries and women’s civil society organisations gathered throughout October to celebrate progress, highlight roadblocks and forge new ways forward. It is odd that a Security Council
  • Geert Wilders’ brand of Islamophobia won’t find an audience in Australia Emeritus Professor Gary Boumaby Gary Bouma Geert Wilders, who is currently visiting Australia to launch a new political party, is a Dutch politician who has made a name for himself by fearmongering about Islam and Muslims. He came to fame in Holland as one of Europe’s recently emergent chorus of anti-immigration and anti-multicultural voices. While Wilders claims not to hate
  • Celebrating 15 years of the United Nations’ Women, Peace and Security Agenda SCR1325This year we celebrate fifteen years since the adoption of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325. This landmark resolution addresses the gender-specific impact of conflict upon women and girls. It stresses the need for their protection from gender-based violence and promotes their participation in peace and security activities including peace negotiations, peacekeeping operations and grassroots peacebuilding
  • Defence and Security in the real world: Monash students attend ADFA Conference ADFAFive Monash undergraduate students were selected to participate in the 2015 Security and Strategy undergraduate conference at the Australian Defence Force College in Canberra last month. Monash students from Politics & International Relations in the School of Social Sciences heard presentations from a range of experts, including Rear-Admiral James Goldbrick, Mr. Chris McNicol (Department of Defence),
  • Monash Arts undergraduate showcases her work at ACUR Magdalena Janas at the Australasian Conference for Undergraduate ResearchMonash Social Sciences student, Magdalena Janas, was selected to be the Faculty of Arts’ representative at the Australasian Conference for Undergraduate Research (ACUR), which took place at the University of Western Australia in Perth last September. The two-day conference, sponsored by the Australian Council for Undergraduate Research, brought together Masters and Honours students, as well as
  • Monash project on Women, Peace & Security makes its way to United Nations Security Council UNSCR 1325 Women, Peace & Security Launch event of the UK Government National Action Plan on United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 Women, Peace & Security in London, 25 November 2010. CC BY 2.0Australian ambassador, H. E. Gillian Bird, made in her statement to the United Nations Security Council yesterday during the annual debate on Women Peace and Security.
  • Ratifying the TPP may be tough, but Australia needs it Remy DavisonRemy Davison, School of Social Sciences Eight years in total of protracted negotiations. Twelve countries. The largest multi-continental trade agreement since APECin 1989. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is complete. Almost. But the road to ratification will be rough. American unions, together with environmental and public health lobbies, are amongst those opposed, which guarantees TPP will have a tough
  • Closing down FOI: a case study in sneaky government Johan-Lidberg-smallJohan Lidberg In a year and a half the Abbott government managed, in practice, to undo the painstaking reforms of the federal Freedom of Information (FOI) system that took shape in 2008 and came into force in late 2010. In the best of worlds, FOI laws can create a win-win situation for governments and their constituents. By
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