School of Social Sciences

  • Turnbull will not succeed as prime minister unless he unites his party kdzvwfae-1 Nick Economou, Monash University When he displaced Tony Abbott as Liberal Party leader, Malcolm Turnbull ascended to what has traditionally been thought of as a position of some power within the party. The Liberal Party is something of a top-down organisation in which the parliamentary leader forms the ministry and defines the party’s policy agenda. The party ...
  • Paul Strangio at the Australian Senate Occasional Lecture Series austalian-senate-occasional-lecture-series  Monash Art’s Associate Professor Paul Strangio will be giving a lecture in Canberra this week as part of the Australian Senate Occasional Lecture Series entitled “The Australian Prime Ministership–Origins and Evolution“. In contemporary Australia the prime ministership is indisputably the most closely observed and fiercely contested office in the land, yet very little has been written about its origins and evolution. Paul Strangio’s lecture ...
  • 2016 Postgraduate Publication Prize Honour-Board-11-604x250The 2016 Faculty of Arts Postgraduate Publication Prize has been awarded to Dr Ben Rich and Ms. Dara Conduit from the Social and Political Science HDR program.
  • Criminology Professor Jude McCulloch appointed to Victoria’s Prevention of Family Violence Standing Committee jude_mcculloch-profile1Professor Jude McCulloch has been appointed to Victoria’s Prevention of Family Violence Standing Committee, chaired by Fiona Richardson, the Minister for Women and Minister for Prevention of Family Violence.  The purpose of the committee is to be the overarching forum for advice to the Family Violence Steering Committee on primary prevention principles, directions and outcomes. ...
  • Migrants from Africa bear brunt of discrimination but remain positive, survey finds andrew_markus-profile1Andrew Markus, Monash University The broad finding of the Scanlon Foundation’s latest survey of Australian attitudes remains that Australia is seen as a good country for immigrants. New arrivals are optimistic, with just 6% indicating they are “strongly dissatisfied” or “dissatisfied”. But not all findings are positive. Among Indigenous Australian respondents, most of whom live in major ...
  • Professor Sharon Pickering presents Fay Gale Lecture Fay-GaleProfessor Sharon Pickering, was honoured on Tuesday night to present the annual Fay Gale Lecture, hosted by the Academy of Social Sciences Australia (ASSA) in conjunction with Monash University at the State Library of Victoria. Introduced by ASSA Fellow Professor Kathleen Dalyfrom Griffith University, Sharon presented her lecture on gender and border deaths in the South ...
  • The new Senate looms as a serious problem for a damaged Malcolm Turnbull Professor Nick EconomouNick Economou, Monash University Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and his Liberal colleagues have had a very poor election. The result in the Senate only confirms just how bad the 2016 contest was for the Coalition. One seat away from being in minority government, the returned Turnbull government can now add arguably one of the most diverse and ...
  • Explainer: who’s who on the new Senate crossbench? senate-election-resultsThe 2016 federal election has finally come to an end, with the AEC declaring who will sit in the next Senate. Monash Arts Zareh Ghazarian explains what it all means.
  • Jihad Selfie: listening to ‘the other side’ in documentary film RackMultipart20140721-28577-8fz9ygNoor Huda Ismail, Monash University One of the important pillars of Roman law for finding out the truth is audiatur et altera pars, the imperative to “listen to the other side”. In our world today, Islamic State, the jihadist group that has brutally captured territories in Iraq and Syria, is largely viewed as being the other side. Due ...
  • Children and the criminal justice system: How young is too young? kate-fitzgibbon-2016-webMonash criminologist Dr Kate Fitz-Gibbon has published an article in The Guardian today with Deakin criminologist Dr Wendy O’Brien. In the wake of the Don Dale incident in the Northern Territory and the announcement of a Royal Commission into the juvenile justice system in Northern Territory, the article, ‘How young is too young’, calls for a ...
  • A complacent, secretive IMF failed to deal with EU crisis; what’s changed? remy-davisonRemy Davison, Monash University In a 650-page report last week, the IMF’s own Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) has castigated the Fund’s handling of the Eurozone crisis. The IEO cited a “culture of complacency” in the IMF; a “failure to identify the build-up of vulnerabilities”; and maintaining an “unworkable strategy” for too long. In the wake of the report, ...
  • Why we’re making no progress tackling the exploitation of migrant workers f2489Marie Segrave, Monash University On Tuesday night, SBS’ Insight program aired concerns about temporary migrant labour exploitation. These issues tend to come to national attention when a particular case is exposed, but mostly they are not seen as national priorities – and, as such, the response is generally reactive rather than proactive. The exploitation to have attracted ...
  • The Border Observatory’s Dr Marie Segrave at AAS High Flyers Think Tank f2489The Border Observatory’s  Dr Marie Segrave was selected to take part in the recent Australian Academy of Sciences Theo Murphy Think Tank: An interdisciplinary approach to living in a risky world hosted by the Academy of Sciences, Theo Murphy High Flyers Think Tank, July 20-22, Canberra. Across two days high achieving early- and mid-career researchers were brought ...
  • Queenslanders will soon see in real-time who’s paying politicians – now Canberra must act f2430Colleen Lewis, Monash University At long last, Australia has a government that is prepared to introduce real-time disclosure for political donations. The Queensland government – and independent Speaker Peter Wellington, who has been crucial in pushing for the change – deserve praise for this long-awaited reform. The significance of Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk’s promise to implement “an electronic ...
  • Memo Steve Price: how ‘hysteria’ has been used to degrade and control women paula-michaels-profilePaula Michaels, Monash University Is there a difference between calling a woman or a man “hysterical”? The word’s origin as the term for a psychological disorder grounded in female physiology suggests the answer is yes. Last week’s verbal tussle on the ABC’s Q&A contributes the latest chapter to our ongoing national conversations about domestic violence, misogyny, and ...
  • PhD Scholarship Success for Criminology’s Madeleine Ulbrick madeline-275x275Monash Criminology doctoral student, tutor and research assistant, Madeleine Ulbrick, has recently been awarded a highly competitive APA scholarship to complete her doctoral research. Madeleine’s thesis, Escaping’ Family Violence: Legal Barriers for Women Beyond the Urban Frontier seeks to investigate what legal barriers exist for Aboriginal, culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and cognitively impaired women ...
  • In a world of low rates, what else can the RBA and central banks do? Remy DavisonRemy Davison, Monash University The world still needs the central banks to bail us out of trouble but the impact of monetary policy is complicated in a world of zero or near-zero interest-rate policy (ZIRP) and negative interest-rate policy (NIRP). Money presents us with three alternatives: we can spend it, save it or invest it. Most households ...
  • Enigmatic Turnbull creates his own misfortune and will be forever diminished by it Shaun CarneyShaun Carney, Monash University Malcolm Turnbull has been leader of the federal Liberal Party twice – once as opposition leader, the second as prime minister. On both occasions, he has blown it. He has not been the victim of outside forces, nor an ambush, nor terrible luck. He has inflicted the damage on himself. The narrative he ...
  • Explainer: what’s at stake in the Australian election? Zareh Ghazarian, Monash University Australia has burned through five prime ministers in five years – and it could soon have another: on July 2, Australians will vote for their next government. But no one seems to have pulled definitively ahead. The opinion polls predict a close battle between the two political forces that have taken turns in ...
  • Shorten the consensus leader unites a fractured Labor, but it may not quite be enough Paul Strangio, Monash University In this first of two major essays on the men who could become prime minister on Saturday night, Paul Strangio examines Bill Shorten’s leadership and campaign. Tomorrow, Michelle Grattan analyses Malcolm Turnbull’s prime ministership and his claims to retain the top job. Campaigning for the Labor leadership against Anthony Albanese in 2013, Bill ...
  • A fringe group no more, the Greens put the frighteners on the two major parties Melbourne MP Greens Adam Bandt is up for re-election at this year’s federal election.Narelle Miragliotta, Monash University At the Greens campaign launch in Melbourne last Sunday, Richard Di Natale made it clear to the major parties that: We’re here to stay. Get used to it. Di Natale’s defiant declaration reflects the party’s exasperation at the difficulty of asserting their relevance in what is essentially a two-party system. A range of factors limit ...
  • Social Sciences researchers to work on ANROWS project mquzXONWAustralia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS) has funded a new research project as part of its 2014-16 Research Priorities, which will involve three Monash academics from the School of Social Sciences.  The project, “Women, disability and violence: Creating access to justice”, will explore the experiences of women with disability in seeking access to justice ...
  • Brexit stage right: what Britain’s decision to leave the EU means for Australia Ben WellingsBen Wellings, Monash University Britain’s decision to leave the European Union has opened a fundamental crack in the western world. Australia’s relationship with the United Kingdom is grounded in the UK’s relationship with the EU. Given Australia’s strong and enduring ties with the UK and the EU, the shockwaves from this epoch-defining event will be felt in ...
  • Witless white noise, virulent ugliness: Brexit debate plays out its last scenes Remy DavisonRemy Davison, Monash University Mass politics versus elite interests. Mad dogs and Englishmen. That’s the Brexit referendum in a nutshell. Make no mistake: this is an internecine struggle between political elites. Brexiters such as Boris Johnson, and UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader, Nigel Farage, paint the European Union (EU) as a remote, authoritarian entity, staffed by automatons ...
  • Both parties to launch in western Sydney, the symbolic heartland of uncommitted but powerful voters Nick Economouby Nick Economou Election campaigns are full of metaphors and symbols, and one of the most enduring in Australian politics is the idea of “western Sydney”. To a non-resident of Australia’s largest city, western Sydney conjures up notions of endless suburbs interspersed with shopping precincts, the ubiquitous leagues clubs and a variety of footballing clubs using ...
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