School of Social Sciences

  • Zareh Ghazarian delivers Senate Occasional Lecture Dr Zareh Ghazarian, Lecturer in Politics and International Relations from the School of Social Sciences, delivered the Senate Occasional Lecture in Parliament House, Canberra on 17 March, 2017. The lecture marked the 40th anniversary of the election of the Australian Democrats to the national parliament. It drew on Dr Ghazarian’s research on minor parties as well ...
  • Testing times: new research project looks at expectations in healthcare testing Australians have high expectations of tests in healthcare. But are they higher than warranted? And are they impacting on healthcare expenditure? Importantly, what role do particular socio-cultural factors play in producing and sustaining expectations that may be higher than warranted by scientific evidence? How do different healthcare contexts shape the meanings attributed to tests—their perceived applications, value ...
  • Outstanding Young Alumni Award 2017: Monash Arts alumnus Fahd Pahdepie Monash Master of International Relations alumnus, Fahd Pahdepie, has won the 2017 Outstanding Young Alumni Award. Supported by the Australian Embassy in Jakarta, the award is part of the 2017 Alumni Awards which recognize and showcase the significant contribution made by Australian Alumni in their professional fields. Fahd is an author and social entrepreneur who developed inspirasi.co, an online platform ...
  • As the Liberal Party continues to fracture, we may be watching its demise by James Walter The Liberal Party is riven by internal bickering, with various camps claiming to speak for its “true” values and traditions. The contest is leading not to any prospect of unity or discipline, but to the party’s fragmentation. The war is fought in the guise of a contest over leadership appropriate to the party’s soul ...
  • Monash alumni launch new Australian women in film festival March 2017 L-R: Melbourne Women in Film Festival 2017 team: Dr Sian Mitchell, Festival Director; Dr Kirsten Stevens, Deputy Director; Dr Whitney Monaghan, Contemporary Shorts Programmer; Janice Loveck (based in Perth; on iPad)Monash Arts Film & Screen Studies PhD alumni Sian Mitchell, Kirsten Stevens, Whitney Monaghan and Janice Loreck are behind the inaugural Melbourne Women in Film Festival (view the trailer) launching 3-4 March 2017 at Melbourne’s Treasury Theatre, the former State Film Centre. We explore the reasons behind why they started the festival and some of its highlights. Firstly, what got you all ...
  • Dr Kirsten Stevens to launch Australian Film Festivals book Dr Kirsten StevensAustralian Film Festivals: Audience, Place and Exhibition Culture is the first book to offer an in-depth examination of the history, operation, and growth of film festivals as a cultural phenomenon within Australia.
  • Playing politics with renewables: how the right is losing its way Rocking the boat: Scott Morrison and his infamous lump of carbon. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas by David Holmes This summer has seen a concerted attack on renewable energy coming out of Canberra, featuring everyone from One Nation senator Malcolm Roberts to Coalition ministers channelling the far right of their party. So absurd and illogical has the broadside been, it ...
  • PewDiePie, new media stars and the court of public opinion Steven Roberts, Monash University and Marcus Maloney, Monash University PewDiePie is the username of the world’s most famous YouTube video blogger, 27-year-old Swede, Felix Kjellberg. PewDiePie’s vlogs, centred on his comedic video game commentaries, attract more than 53 million (mostly young) subscribers – more than any other YouTube channel. He was ranked by Forbes in December ...
  • Let’s talk about sex: inclusion in the classroom and beyond with Dr Kirsten McLean Kirsten McLean, landscape, photo by Kara RasmanisDr Kirsten McLean received a Vice Chancellor’s Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning in 2016 – one of the top awards from Monash University for teaching – for creating an inclusive environment for teaching Sexuality and Society. Kirsten is also deputy chair of the Diverse Sexualities and Genders Advisory Group at Monash University who are working to provide a diversity-conscious curriculum ...
  • WA state election: Liberals’ deal with One Nation may come back to bite them Narelle Miragliotta, Monash University Elections are colourful affairs, and the March 11 state election in Western Australia is no exception. What is bringing particular clamour to this election is the resurgence of One Nation. Pauline Hanson’s party has certainly made its presence felt. The party is contesting 35 of the state’s 59 Legislative Assembly seats, and fielding ...
  • Bernardi should have resigned his Senate seat: here’s why Narelle Miragliotta, Monash University Senator Cory Bernardi’s decision to quit the Liberal Party comes as no surprise to most political observers. For quite some time, and certainly since Malcolm Turnbull’s elevation to the Liberal leadership, Bernardi’s resignation from the party was always a distinct possibility. However, his decision to quit the party without resigning from the Senate ...
  • More police won’t necessarily lead to better outcomes on family violence – here’s what we need Marie Segrave, Monash University; Dean Wilson, University of Sussex, and Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University The Victorian government is recruiting more frontline police as part of a broader drive to tackle crime in the state. Among the new recruits will be 415 officers specially trained to deal with family violence. The efforts to change attitudes and behaviours that ...
  • Turnbull makes a good start on expenses, but needs to go further Colleen Lewis, Monash University It is regrettable that the path leading to the establishment of an independent body to oversee the work-related expenses of parliamentarians has been so tortuous. It is also regrettable that it took such an inordinate amount of time for a political leader to conclude that creating such a body was essential to ...
  • Five things to consider when designing a policy to measure research impact Andrew Gunn, University of Leeds and Michael Mintrom, Monash University This year will see the Australian government pilot new ways to measure the impact of university research. As recommended by the Watt Review, the Engagement and Impact Assessment will encourage universities to ensure academic research produces wider economic and social benefits. This fits into the National Innovation and ...
  • Expenses reform is easy and essential – the only thing lacking is politicians’ resolve to do it Colleen Lewis, Monash University What is it that too many politicians don’t get about the inappropriate use of taxpayer-funded expenses and the need to reform federal political donations laws and establish a federal anti-corruption body? The answer to those questions may help explain why MPs continue to behave inappropriately in each area. This is important, as the ...
  • The smashed avo debate misses inequality within generations Steven Roberts, Monash University and Alan France, University of Auckland There’s no doubt there are differences between the experiences and opportunities of young people compared to their parents. But when you enter the smashed avocado debate of baby boomers versus millennials, you overlook the inequality between members of the same generation. This also misses other ways ...
  • Women, Peace and Security in Asia Pacific: Emerging Issues in National Action Plans Monash GPS Director Professor Jacqui True has published a discussion paper for UN Women entitled, Women, Peace and Security in Asia Pacific: emerging issues in National Action Plans for Women, Peace and Security. The central theme of the discussion paper focusses on Women, Peace and Security National Action Plans in the Asia-Pacific region. In particular, it ...
  • What is rumbling Australia’s economy ahead of MYEFO Remy DavisonRemy Davison, Monash University The Turnbull government’s Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) takes place in a dramatically different environment from 2015-16. The dual shocks of Brexit, and the promulgation of a protectionist Trump administration in 2017, present major challenges to the global economy. In late 2015, few predicted either of these scenarios emerging. The US and ...
  • Dangerous Research: PhD candidate Maria Tanyag on field work and feminist research Maria Tanyag is a PhD candidate in International Relations with the Monash Gender, Peace and Security Centre at Monash Arts. Her PhD research explores the sexual and reproductive rights of women in post-conflict and post-disaster settings in the Philippines, and has taken her to a number of remote communities where she tries to understand how people ...
  • Women as leaders and peacekeepers: Dr Lesley Pruitt More than 118,000 peacekeepers – military, police and civilian – currently serve in 16 UN peace operations around the world. Currently 123 countries contribute military police and personnel but it’s not just the diversity of nationalities that is changing the face of UN peacekeeping – it’s also the more prominent presence of women. In 2000 ...
  • Parliament finishes for 2016, capping off a messy, turbulent year Nick Economou, Monash University; Carol Johnson, University of Adelaide, and Natalie Mast, University of Western Australia Federal parliament has finished for 2016, capped off by a rush of deal-making on key government policies. Three of our experts look back on a messy, busy year of running the country. Nick Economou, Monash University This was the year in which ...
  • There is no female president this time, and women are divided about it Jacqui True, Monash University and Aida Arfan Hozić, University of Florida This is what we learned on November 8th: a white pantsuit is not an antidote to global Trumpism. Here is why. Donald Trump’s victory is more than just an election of another American president, it is a regime change. This momentous event will affect the functioning ...
  • Trump can kill trade deals but he can’t kill globalisation Remy Davison, Monash University 2016 will go down as a watershed year for all the wrong reasons: Britain’s EU exit faces strong opposition; Syria remains plunged in civil war; and in the wake of the US election politics in the two major Anglosphere democracies are now deeply polarised. In Britain and the US, the majority of voters ...
  • Can private security companies improve responses to victims of family violence? Diarmaid Harkin, Deakin University and Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University In an Australian first, the Salvation Army has partnered with a private security company, Protective Group, in a large-scale project to provide safety solutions to family violence victims. The Safer In The Home project launched in September 2016 operates in Victoria, Tasmania and Queensland. By 2017 and ...
  • How Jakarta’s first Chinese Indonesian governor became an easy target for radical Islamic groups Noor Huda Ismail, Monash University Jakarta saw its biggest protest in years on Friday, prompting president Joko Widodo to cancel his planned visit to Australia. Some Western media report that the rally of some 200,000 people marching in protest against the Chinese-Christian Jakarta governor Basuki Tjahaya Purnama, popularly known as Ahok, was a “show of strength” and ...
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