School of Social Sciences

  • Gender and Myanmar’s Kachin conflict Kachin Independence Army (KIA) and civilian militia trainees xxx during a three month basic military training course on a base near Laiza in KIA controlled territory of Kachin State, Myanmar on Jan. 4, 2012.Too often we are blind to the gendered roots of violence and conflict in Myanmar. Much of the focus on Myanmar’s ongoing political transformation and prospects for peace has centred on intrastate conflict and ethnic nationalism. These analyses often frame military actors and institutions as key actors in the development of the country. The roles and experiences of
  • Leveraging the Women, Peace and Security Plan WPS True articleby Jacqui True and Anna Powles This year New Zealand will become the 49th country to adopt a National Action Plan (NAP) on women, peace and security. This is fifteen years after the adoption of United Nations Security Council (UNSC) Resolution 1325 and eleven years after Kofi Annan’s call for member states to develop NAPs. New Zealand has
  • Longing for Labor to reform itself? National conference may not provide it document_iconby Narelle Miragliotta (Monash) and Nicholas Barry (La Trobe University) Hopes for root-and-branch internal reform of the federal Labor Party at its national conference look set to be dashed. The draft organisational reform agenda, published ahead of this weekend’s conference, signals that wholesale democratisation of the party’s decision-making structures may not happen. Expectations had been building for more than a year
  • Hope in Health: new book by Monash’s Alan Petersen Hope in Health book coverThe language of hope permeates contemporary health and healthcare. It is believed that patients who are hopeful are more likely to recover, and health professionals endeavour to ‘instil’ or ‘manage’ hope in patients. The rhetoric of hope is extensively employed in marketing medical tests, treatments and devices. Despite this focus on hope in health, sociologists
  • Sustaining future ideas: Oxfam-Monash Innovators develop the Sustain Me app Sustain Me appWhat do you get when you put together Monash alumni, a love for technology and a keen interest helping their community recycle as much as possible? … The Sustain Me app! In 2013, then Monash students Eleanor Meyer and Stephen Halpin took part in the Oxfam-Monash Innovators competition, run through the Oxfam-Monash Partnership. The competition seeks to
  • Monash Criminlogy travels to British Criminology Conference BSC2015 bannerMonash Criminology was well represented at all levels at this year’s British Criminology Conference in Plymouth, with Monash academics and PhD students contributing to all aspects of the program. With the theme for this year’s conference being ‘Voyages of Critical Discovery’ it was fitting that Professor Sharon Pickering anchored the final plenary session on the nexus between
  • Experts response: Greece votes No Remy DavisonExpert response by Costas Milas, University of Liverpool; George Kyris, University of Birmingham; Nikos Papastergiadis, University of Melbourne; Remy Davison, Monash University; Richard Holden, UNSW Australia, and Ross Buckley, UNSW Australia The Greek people have voted, saying a resounding No to the terms of the bailout deal offered by their international creditors. What will this mean for
  • Monash at the International Feminist Journal of Politics Conference in Brisbane Some of the participants from Monash Arts at the IFJP Conference in Brisbane.Gender, peace, women’s rights and international conflict  were all in the spotlight at the 2015 International Feminist Journal of Politics Conference held in Brisbane last week.  The Conference, which was hosted by the University of Queensland and sponsored by QUT and Monash University, focused on a theme that related gender to peace and security, and included key
  • Design Competition: Monash – WhyDev Development mentoring program WhyDevCalling all creative thinkers! Put your design skills to the test and win $200! Monash Arts and WhyDev need your help to design a name, logo and style guide for a new online mentoring program we’re working on for students in their final year of the Master of International Development Practice. With your help, we’ll get the
  • Oxfam-Monash Partnership breaks down inequality at ACFID Conference Oxfam Monash Partnership logoMonash University recently hosted the 5th ACFID University Network Conference: Evidence and Practice in an Age of Inequality. The conference brought together academics and practitioners from diverse disciplinary backgrounds to discuss the contemporary challenges of inequality in the context of research, policy and practice. The Oxfam-Monash Partnership coordinated a panel discussion as part of the conference on
  • Monash hosts national forum on domestic violence and interpreting document_iconMonash’s Translation and Interpreting Studies Program will run a forum on domestic violence and interpreting. The forum, to be held on the 24th-25th of September 2015, will address domestic violence and the provision of interpreting services for victims of domestic violence and their families. The Forum brings together researchers in Translation and Interpreting Studies, Gender Violence, Criminology, Social
  • Monash student elected to head new global youth network Monash students Sam Loni (far right) and Michelle Huang (third from left) with SDSN Youth colleagues from Italy, Turkey, US, UK, Brazil and Germany at the launch event in Paris (photo: Sustainable Development Solutions Network)Monash Arts student Siamak Sam Loni has been named Global Coordinator of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) Youth at the launch of the group in Paris last week.   SDSN is a global network of universities and other organisations that collectively are mobilising scientific and technical expertise in support of sustainable development. Monash University, through
  • Students disrupt development at student-led forum Disrupting Development HashtagLast week, Monash co-hosted a Student-led forum, lead primarily by Master of International Development Practice students, which focussed on development and the role of students in addressing global issues.  #DisruptingDevelopment “I believe in equal opportunity and equal access to social services but most importantly a recognition of human rights” – Umbelina #studentforum A photo posted by Disrupting
  • Linking People: timely book on Australian-Indonesian relationship Linking People CoverThe Australia–Indonesia bilateral relationship has faced significant ruptures in recent times as a result of a string of high profile incidents related to border control, spying and trade restrictions. However this volatile relationship is at odds with the two countries stated aims for a strong neighbourly partnership. Linking People; Connections and encounters between Australians and Indonesians
  • Why we need a feminist foreign policy to stop war jacqui_true-profile1Feminist foreign policy is au courant, but what does it mean in practice? Foreign policy informed by feminist analysis must confront masculine hegemonies in state military-industrial complexes that fuel and fund conflicts. “Feminist foreign policy” appears to be the flavour of the month. While we are still trying to understand what that means, we have Margot
  • Greens’ leadership shifts from Tasmania to the greenest state Nick Economouby Nick Economou The balance of power in Australian green politics has now shifted, with the choice of Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale as the Greens’ new parliamentary leader. And for a party renowned for its suspicion of the idea of leadership, the way that change was handled is a political lesson other parties would do
  • Radzinwicz Prize Win for Criminlogy’s Prof Sharon Pickering and Julie Ham sharon pickeringDirector of the Border Crossing Observatory Professor Sharon Pickering (Criminology), alongside co-author Julie Ham, who recently submitted her PhD, have won the 2014 British Journal of Criminology Radzinwicz Memorial Prize for best article titled ‘Hotpants at the border: Sorting sex work from trafficking‘. The prize is awarded by the Journal’s editors to the article they judge to contribute most
  • Aim must be to break the cycle of radicalisation Greg Bartonby Greg Barton According to police, an alleged plot to launch an outrageous attack on Anzac Day in Melbourne has been thwarted. That is certainly good news but it is not one of those stories where we can simply move on and forget. There are two questions to grapple with. Are alleged plots like this the shape
  • Publication: New book on international students and crime International Students and Crime bookInternational Students and Crime by Helen Forbes-Mewett (Sociology), Jude McCulloch (Criminology) and Chris Nylan (International Business) was published this month by Palgrave Macmillan. The book, based on interviews with over a hundred and fifty key informers, analyses an issue of major international concern that impacts on lucrative international student markets, international relations, host countries’ reputations
  • Gough’s war: making a politician, changing a nation Professor Jenny Hockingby Jenny Hocking In July 1944, stationed with RAAF Squadron 13 in Gove, Flight Lieutenant Navigator Gough Whitlam wrote “a letter of passion” to his wife, Margaret: Darling … You must conjecture what State administration would have been like in war and compare it with what Commonwealth has been. Similarly you may conjecture what Commonwealth administration may
  • A global war for relevance: can al-Qaeda reclaim the jihadi crown? Ben Richby Ben Rich With a new, vibrant generation of jihadist groups such as Islamic State (IS) emerging, al-Qaeda – which once forged the path for global Islamist militancy – is struggling to maintain its relevance and support base. Why? al-Qaeda: a one-hit wonder? Following the 9/11 attacks, al-Qaeda became the incontestable embodiment of global jihad. The “War on
  • State of imprisonment: Victoria is leading the nation backwards imprisonmentby Dr Marie Segrave, Dr Anna Eriksson and Emma Russell This article is part of The Conversation’s series, State of Imprisonment, which provides snapshots of imprisonment trends in each state and territory. The intention is to provide a basis for informed public discussion of imprisonment policies and of the costs and consequences for Australia of rising rates of incarceration. Victoria was
  • Highlighting 25 years of the Victorian Parliamentary Internship Program parliament-2014This year, the Victorian Parliament celebrates the 25 Year Anniversary of the Internship Program. The program offers students studying Politics at Monash the opportunity to undertake a parliamentary internship as part of their degree.  As part of the celebration of the 25 year anniversary, we are highlight prominent Monash alumni who took part in this internship during the course
  • Greece will survive another D-Day – no thanks to Russia Remy Davisonby Remy Davison Greece will avoid D-Day. That’s D for “Default”. This week, Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis met with IMF chief Christine Lagarde, assuring her that Athens would meet its €450 million obligation to the Fund, due on April 9. Had Greece failed to meet that deadline, it would have been formally in default. But markets
  • The state of imprisonment in Australia: it’s time to take stock Marie Segraveby Dr Marie Segrave This article introduces The Conversation’s series, State of Imprisonment, which provides snapshots of imprisonment trends in each state and territory. The intention is to provide a basis for informed public discussion of imprisonment policies and of the costs and consequences for Australia of rising rates of incarceration. Australia has reached a decade-high rate of
Read more