School of Social Sciences

  • Gough’s war: making a politician, changing a nation Professor Jenny Hockingby Jenny Hocking In July 1944, stationed with RAAF Squadron 13 in Gove, Flight Lieutenant Navigator Gough Whitlam wrote “a letter of passion” to his wife, Margaret: Darling … You must conjecture what State administration would have been like in war and compare it with what Commonwealth has been. Similarly you may conjecture what Commonwealth administration may
  • A global war for relevance: can al-Qaeda reclaim the jihadi crown? Ben Richby Ben Rich With a new, vibrant generation of jihadist groups such as Islamic State (IS) emerging, al-Qaeda – which once forged the path for global Islamist militancy – is struggling to maintain its relevance and support base. Why? al-Qaeda: a one-hit wonder? Following the 9/11 attacks, al-Qaeda became the incontestable embodiment of global jihad. The “War on
  • State of imprisonment: Victoria is leading the nation backwards imprisonmentby Dr Marie Segrave, Dr Anna Eriksson and Emma Russell This article is part of The Conversation’s series, State of Imprisonment, which provides snapshots of imprisonment trends in each state and territory. The intention is to provide a basis for informed public discussion of imprisonment policies and of the costs and consequences for Australia of rising rates of incarceration. Victoria was
  • Highlighting 25 years of the Victorian Parliamentary Internship Program parliament-2014This year, the Victorian Parliament celebrates the 25 Year Anniversary of the Internship Program. The program offers students studying Politics at Monash the opportunity to undertake a parliamentary internship as part of their degree.  As part of the celebration of the 25 year anniversary, we are highlight prominent Monash alumni who took part in this internship during the course
  • Greece will survive another D-Day – no thanks to Russia Remy Davisonby Remy Davison Greece will avoid D-Day. That’s D for “Default”. This week, Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis met with IMF chief Christine Lagarde, assuring her that Athens would meet its €450 million obligation to the Fund, due on April 9. Had Greece failed to meet that deadline, it would have been formally in default. But markets
  • The state of imprisonment in Australia: it’s time to take stock Marie Segraveby Dr Marie Segrave This article introduces The Conversation’s series, State of Imprisonment, which provides snapshots of imprisonment trends in each state and territory. The intention is to provide a basis for informed public discussion of imprisonment policies and of the costs and consequences for Australia of rising rates of incarceration. Australia has reached a decade-high rate of
  • When jihadists post selfies the government struggles to respond Noor Huda IsmailBy Noor Huda Ismail Like many of us, jihadists with Islamic State (IS) like to take selfies. And hard-line Islamic media like to post them on their websites. These images glorify life under IS to impressionable men and women who are moving to Syria at an alarming rate. Should Islamic websites that post these narratives be banned? Recently,
  • Saudi incursion in Yemen more about security than sectarianism Ben Richby Ben Rich With claims that Saudi Arabia has mobilised 150,000 ground troops for its incursion into Yemen, Operation “Decisive Storm” is shaping up as Saudi Arabia’s largest single military operation. Some have characterised the Saudi incursion against the Shia Houthi insurgency as yet another manifestation of aregion-wide war between Sunni and Shia Muslims. However, the drivers
  • Lacking an agenda, the Abbott government’s time is running out Shaun CarneyBy Shaun Carney The release of the tax policy discussion paper by Treasurer Joe Hockey more than 18 months into the life of the Abbott government offers important clues to the problems the Coalition has been suffering since it took office in September 2013. When it comes to producing a comprehensive, far-reaching policy regime – a coherent
  • Monash Criminology seminar program 2015 document_iconThis year’s in-house seminar program kicks off on April  30 with a presentation by visiting scholar Anita Heber on  her current research into public representations of organised crime in Sweden. This will be followed on May 12 when Leanne Weber from Monash Criminology leads a discussion about her edited collection ‘Rethinking Border Control for a
  • The long and lonely political journey of Malcolm Fraser Shaun CarneyBy Shaun Carney It was the greatest political transformation of any major Australian public figure in modern times. Malcolm Fraser,“the crazy grazier” who in 1975 did whatever it took to “rescue” the nation from its first federal Labor government in almost a quarter of a century, moved progressively away from the party for whom he had
  • Making Australia Great despite themselves: PMs stake rival claims Remy Davisonby Remy Davison. Six prime ministers. Four decades. Two recessions. Australia: 24 million Not Out. Not out in the cold, that is. As Singapore’s former prime minister, Lee Kwan Yew grimly warned Bob Hawke, a few more decades like the ‘70s and Australians would wind up “the poor, white trash of Asia”. Lee was wrong. Australia became rich,
  • Women Confronting ISIS: Monash academic at symposium on women, extremism and local strategies CUNY event posterThis month, Professor Jacqui True took presented at a day long symposium entitled ‘Women Confronting ISIS: Local Strategies and States’ Responsibilities’ held in New York. The symposium largely centred on women’s activism in the face of gender-based atrocities committed by ISIS, as well as state-sanctioned discrimination and violence, offering insights into grassroots activism lead by women
  • Monash at ‘imprisonment’ panel discussion at Wheeler Centre anna_erikssonMonash Criminology’s Dr Anna Eriksson will join other academics and legal professionals in a panel discussion facilitated by Maxine McKew at the Wheeler Centre in May. The aim of this event is to generate a new conversation about Victorian trends in imprisonment and to identify how innovation can reduce the imprisonment rate and result in better short and long-term outcomes
  • Screening: “Here and There: Everyday Life Narratives of Migrant Women from Turkey Living in Melbourne” Capture-2-e1425431881321-1024x730 (1)The digital stories that were produced in three workshops facilitated by Burcu Şimşek in the scope of the “Here and There: Everyday Life Narratives of Migrant Women from Turkey Living in Melbourne” will be screened on the first part of the event that will be held on March 4th, 2015 at ACMI. The project was supported by Hacettepe
  • ‘Emotional Experiences of Early Parenthood’ project on HiSNet Renata KokanovicA new online resource supporting Australian families in early parenthood produced by The Health in Society Research Network (HiSNet) The Health in Society Research Network (HiSNet) is a unique, interdisciplinary research network based at the School of Social Sciences dedicated to understanding health and illness experiences in the social context. Under Sociology’s Associate Professor Renata Kokanovic’s leadership,
  • Tough measures on counterterrorism go hand in hand with grassroots strategy Greg Bartonby Greg Barton   Long before the 9/11 attacks in 2001 and the Bali bombings in 2002, the threat of terrorism has demanded disproportionate attention from the security community in Australia. Now, following the rise of the Islamic State movement in June last year, and its shift in September to actively promoting lone-wolf terror attacks, the need
  • Australia must prepare for the mother of all hangovers Remy Davisonby Rémy Davison You know Australia’s in trouble when the Reserve Bank cuts interest rates. Last week, the central bank did precisely that, in belated recognition of the income recession that has struck. Gross domestic income (GDI) fell by 0.3% in the June quarter of 2014, followed by a further 0.4% slump in the September quarter. The RBA
  • Explainer: what is halal, and how does certification work? wraps and saladby James Wong and Julian Millie Halal food certification in Australia has become a contentious issue. Recently, a Western Australian cafereceived hateful and anti-Islamic messages after its owners tried to explain halal on Facebook. A South Australian companystopped certifying its yoghurt in November 2014 after it was targeted by a social media campaign. And on Tuesday, independent
  • Victorian Model United Nations comes to Monash vic-mun-logoMonash University is hosting the Victorian Model United Nations (VicMUN 2015) this year. The model conference will run from Wednesday 11th February – Friday 13th February, and is held at Clayton Campus. There will also be social events every evening of the conference, where participants will be able to mingle and network with delegates from all
  • Liberal leadership tensions give neglected backbenchers a voice 7d638d09758bfdd0a51beae7d4f26029_nby Narelle Miragliotta It is difficult to pinpoint a specific reason to explain the leadership crisis presently gripping the federal Liberal Party. Why is it that Prime Minister Tony Abbott is facing a leadership spill only 17 months after having led his party to government? Why is it that individuals within the Liberal party room are
  • Australia vote: No ringing endorsement for Abbott zareh ghazarianby Zareh Ghazarian When Mr Abbot became prime minister after the 2013 general election, he promised to provide stable government. This was in contrast to the Labor Party that had changed leader three times in three years. Now, the Liberal Party has found itself in a similar leadership quagmire. Critics inside the party have argued the prime
  • Overcoming the social barriers to climate consensus Blue Sky with cloudsby Ana-Maria Bliuc and Craig McGarty It can be tempting to think that people who disagree with you are mad, bad or simply stupid. However, not only are such judgements usually wrong, but telling people that they are stupid is unlikely to convince them of the merit of your own view. Yet this is often what happens when it
  • What ails Abbott is but a symptom of disease of government today Assoc Prof Shaun Carneyby Shaun Carney If a single speech is regarded as a make-or-break event for an Australian prime minister, then that prime minister faces an uncomfortable future. That’s because the “make” part is a fraud. Tony Abbott could have finished himself off with a dreadful performance at hisappearance at the National Press Club on Monday. But he
  • Black Saturday research wins national award L-R: Claire Zara, Debra Parkinson, The Hon Michael Keenan MP, Minister for Justice, Susie Reid, Helen Riseborough at the Award presentationMonash researchers have received an award for their groundbreaking work with communities affected by the Black Saturday bushfires in 2009. PhD candidates Ms Debra Parkinson, School of Social Sciences, and Ms Claire Zara, Monash Injury Research Institute (MIRI) received the Resilient Australia Award under the category ‘National Significance’ for a joint project with Women’s Health Goulburn North
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