School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies

  • Scorsese’s Silence and the Catholic connection to the atomic bomb image-20161006-20123-bjpqpdGwyn McClelland, Monash University Today, Martin Scorsese’s Silence will have its premiere at the Vatican, where it will be screened to hundreds of Roman Catholic priests. The famed director’s first foray into East Asia links to familiar themes of Catholic guilt and redemption, as he portrays the brutal 17th century persecution of Jesuit missionaries and their ...
  • Professor Bain Attwood gives Returning Harvard Lecture harvard-returning-chair-lecture-20161115-190850dsc_3361Monash academic and leading scholar in the field of cross-cultural history Professor Bain Attwood presented the 2016 Returning Harvard Chair of Australian Studies Lecture. Why did the British government deny Indigenous sovereignty and rights of land in its Australian colonies in the 18th century only to recognise them in New Zealand in 19th century? The question in recent ...
  • Australians more alarmed about state of politics than impact of migration and minorities, survey finds andrew_markus-profile1Andrew Markus, Monash University There is no shortage of expert commentary on current shifts in public opinion, understood as a revolt against political elites. Within Europe and the United States interpretations are supported by the British vote to leave the European Union, the increasing popularity of far-right parties campaigning on anti-immigration and nationalist platforms, and the success ...
  • Religion and the US election: does faith matter anymore? verhoeven_t_02-1-225x300Tim Verhoeven, Monash University It is often remarked that Americans will elect almost anyone except an atheist. Only one of the 535 members of the current Congress professes to be religiously unaffiliated. Polls consistently show Americans want their political leaders to be religious. This applies even to the purportedly secularist Democratic Party. Though the figure has been ...
  • Migrants from Africa bear brunt of discrimination but remain positive, survey finds andrew_markus-profile1Andrew Markus, Monash University The broad finding of the Scanlon Foundation’s latest survey of Australian attitudes remains that Australia is seen as a good country for immigrants. New arrivals are optimistic, with just 6% indicating they are “strongly dissatisfied” or “dissatisfied”. But not all findings are positive. Among Indigenous Australian respondents, most of whom live in major ...
  • Small viruses, big questions: Ethical responses to Zika and Ebola rio-favelasThe Zika virus has been a concern for 2016 Olympics in Rio, Professor Michael Selgelid considers the complex ethical issues such viruses present.
  • Symposium brings together women philosophers Keynote speaker Professor Linda Lopez McAlister addresses the SymposiumMonash recently hosted the 16th Symposium of the International Association of Women Philosophers (IAPh),  the first ever IAPh symposium to be held in Australia. The event was held from 7 to 10 July and the lead organisers were Associate Professor Jacqueline Broad (Monash) and Associate Professor Karen Green (Melbourne University). More than 130 delegates from Europe, Australasia, Asia, Canada, ...
  • Strong Monash line-up at the Melbourne Writers Festival nasya-photoMonash University academics are well represented at the Melbourne Writers Festival, a two-week celebration of Australia’s writers, readers and thinkers. Monash University representatives can be found here. Journalism senior lecturer Dr Nasya Bahfen will be speaking at the first session on Friday, August 26. The forum is a free event. Details below … Dr Nasya Bahfen Lecturer Journalism “Forum: The Right ...
  • How gross inequality and crushed hopes have fed the rise of Donald Trump image-20160721-8638-1topylvNick Fischer, Monash University Donald Trump is now the Republican nominee for president of the United States and millions of people are asking: “How could this happen?” There is no single answer to this question, but there are some explanations. For while the nomination of a reality-TV star and businessman with no executive experience is unprecedented, the ...
  • Congratulations to Evie Kendal, winner of the 2016 Faculty of Arts 3-Minute Thesis Competition evie-kendal 3MT is an academic competition that sees graduate research students from across Australia and the Asia Pacific compete against each other in a battle to provide the most engaging, inspirational and concise three minute summary of their research. The competition provides current candidates with the opportunity to: develop academic and research communication skills share the important and ...
  • Medieval history and finding what you love: A conversation with Monash Historian Kathleen Neal Kathleen (centre) with students at the 'Medieval Expo', a showcase of public history projects by teams of first year undergraduate students. Photo: Matt Chen, Faculty of ArtsWe recently chatted to Monash Historian, Dr Kathleen Neal. Kathleen discussed her first career as a scientist, and how she found a job she loves by following her passions, which led her to Medieval history and historical research. Kathleen told us about her current research projects, what she loves about her job, and her favourite ...
  • History’s Adam Clulow awarded 2016 W.K. Hancock Prize Adam Clulow's The Company and the ShogunMonash History’s Dr Adam Clulow was awarded the 2016 W.K. Hancock Prize at the Australian Historical Association Conference last week.  The W.K. Hancock Prize recognises and encourages an Australian scholar who has published a first book in any field of history in 2014 or 2015. Adam was awarded the prize for his monograph, The Company and The Shogun: The ...
  • History in practice: Monash Arts graduate interned with International Criminal Tribunal Stephanie-Sprott-ITCY-internIn 2015 Monash Arts/Law alumnus, Stephanie Sprott, did an internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ITCY). We talked to her about the challenges and rewards of this unique experience, and how it relates to her recent studies in law and history. Why did you choose to do the internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia? I thought ...
  • Memo Steve Price: how ‘hysteria’ has been used to degrade and control women paula-michaels-profilePaula Michaels, Monash University Is there a difference between calling a woman or a man “hysterical”? The word’s origin as the term for a psychological disorder grounded in female physiology suggests the answer is yes. Last week’s verbal tussle on the ABC’s Q&A contributes the latest chapter to our ongoing national conversations about domestic violence, misogyny, and ...
  • Dr Monima Chadha awarded the 2016 Annette Baier Prize monima-chadha-profileMonash philosopher Dr Monima Chadha has been awarded the 2016 Annette Baier Prize by the Australasian Association of Philosophy. This prize recognises an outstanding contribution by an Australasian woman philosopher.
  • Monash Historians recognised by Australian Historical Association History-Awards-BookcoversIt’s been a great week for Monash Historians, as the Australian Historical Association shortlisted three Monash Arts academics for the W.K. Hancock Prize. The W.K. Hancock Prize shortlist, announced June 9th, was made up of three Monash Arts Academics. The Prize recognises and encourages an Australian scholar who has published a first book in any field of history ...
  • Monash Historian Professor Christina Twomey joins International Coordinating Committee of Historians Without Borders Historioitsijat-ilman-rajojaIn May 2016, Professor Christina Twomey attended the preliminary meeting in Helsinki of a new international network, Historians Without Borders. Initiated by the former Finnish Foreign Minister, Mr Erkki Tomouija, the network aims to promote better knowledge of history among policy makers, peacekeepers and in the process of conflict resolution. Medicines Sans Frontiers save lives ...
  • NCAS historian launches new book on the Vietnam War IMG_8650 copyMonash Historian, Associate Professor Nathalie Nguyen, celebrated the launch of her book, South Vietnamese Soldiers: Memories of the Vietnam War and After, on May 9th 2016. “South Vietnamese soldiers are the forgotten soldiers of the Vietnam War,” notes Monash University historian Associate Professor Nathalie Nguyen. “My book breaks new ground by exploring their untold histories.” The launch ...
  • ‘It makes one feel and realise what a dreadful thing war is’ – a nurse’s story image-20160421-7989-b2icihby Janet Scarfe, Monash University Five thousand Australian nurses served during the second world war. The most famous of these, Lieutenant Colonel Vivian Bullwinkel, survived a massacre on Bangka Island, and Japanese “hell camps” in Sumatra. For many other nurses, life in WWII was by turns tedious, perilous and adventurous. Dorothy Janet Campbell was one of the ...
  • Monash Philosophy alumni at Oxford oxfordIn 2017 three Monash Philosophy alumni will be associated with Oxford’s Faculty of Philosophy.
  • What are the real risks of Zika? Professor Michael Selgelidby Michael Selgelid and Euzebiusz Jamrozik Zika has raised alarm bells worldwide, prompting the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) declaration…
  • Student ambassador in Myanmar: 2016 Colombo Plan scholar James Barklamb James Barklamb and Andrew Robb“The next few years in Myanmar promise to be a period of rapid development, democratisation and international engagement, and I am extremely fortunate and excited to be a part of this.”
  • Congratulations to SOPHIS Student: Victorian Young Australian of the Year 2016 Robert-Gillies-200x300Robert Gillies, a student in the School of Philosophical,  Historical and International Studies, has won the Victorian Young Australian of the Year. Undertaking three university degrees simultaneously, leading an orchestra and playing for a number of sporting clubs would leave most people exhausted. But not Robert. He’s also found the time to devote himself to social enterprises ...
  • Medieval history now published in lego form Medieval Lego by No Starch Press: https://www.nostarch.com/medievallegoMonash’s Dr Kathleen Neal (Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies) is among medievalists from across the globe who contributed to a new history book for children, Medieval Lego. The book, which features events from mostly English medieval history, is illustrated with vibrant Lego constructions. The book is published by No Starch Press.  The book covers events from mostly English medieval ...
  • States have no right to stop anyone wanting to access IVF ryan-tonkensRyan Tonkens There’s no moral difference between people who have children “naturally” and those who need medical help, so imposing conditions on the latter without good moral reasons is just plain discriminatory. But that hasn’t stopped some governments from not allowing access to reproductive assistance equally. Read the argument for state intervention in assisted reproduction. In the Australian ...
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