Trans-Asia events

  • Monash Asia Institute Focus Theme Inaugural Seminar

    Key issues on Diversity, Mobility and Inclusion for Trans-Asian approaches

    Date & Time: 31 March Friday, 12-2pm (light lunch will be provided)

    Venue: N105, Caulfield Campus, Monash University

    Speakers:

    Julian Millie (Centre for Southeast Asian Studies)

    Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash Asia Institute)

    In a globalized world in which people’s mobility and accompanying human exchange have been intensifying, the promotion of diversity is a key issue. While the current attention to diversity tends to be economy-driven with an emphasis on its utility to make the workplace creative and globally competitive, this seminar will discuss what kind of issues regarding socio-cultural diversity, human mobility and inclusion are emergent and need to be critically studied in various parts of Asia and whether and how we can make a comparative examination of Asian cases and/or collaboratively tackle the transnationally shared issues which are distinctly articulated in specific local contexts.

    This seminar is an inaugural event of the establishment of MAI focus themes and regional coordinators (please see http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/mai/). Together with focus theme and regional coordinators, we will discuss how to productively promote collaborative research by organizing seminars/conferences and inviting international visiting scholars to Monash.

    Please RSVP for catering purpose to MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu by 25 March.

     

  • Trans-Asia as method is an academic seminar series that aims to facilitate trans-Asian and cross-disciplinary dialogue by comparatively and collaboratively examining how globally shared issues are similarly, differently, and/or inter-connectedly articulated in various local contexts of Asian regions.

    Scholars working in Australian contexts, and scholars working in Asian Australian experiences are also constitutive of trans-Asian dialogue. Such discussion will lead to developing new conceptualisation and theorisation from Asian experiences and de-Westernising the production of knowledge.

  • FOCUS THEMES & REGIONAL COORDINATORS (**Inaugural Seminar on 31 March**)

    MAI establishes four focus themes to promote inter-disciplinary and trans-Asian research collaboration and dialogue. Coordinators of focus themes will organize trans-Asia seminar series. MAI will also invite international scholars who are working on the below themes to give a talk at trans-Asia seminar series.

    1. Migration, Diaspora and Belonging (Coordinated by GIl Soo Han and Mridula Chakraborty)
    2. Diversity, Mobility and Inclusion (coordinated by Julian Millie & Koichi Iwabuchi)
    3. Media, Culture and Performance (coordinated by Ariel Heryanto & Olivia Khoo)
    4. Cultural Citizenship and Public Pedagogy (coordinated by Koichi Iwabuchi & Philip Chan)

     

    MAI also appoint regional coordinators who are responsible for facilitating cross-regional exchange and responding to inquiries about the research of the region:

    East Asia: Gil Soo Han and Gloria Davies/Jonathan Benney

    Southeast Asia: Ariel Heryanto and Julian Millie

    South Asia: Mridula Chakraborty and Chandani Lokuge

 

 

Past events

Trans-Asia Workshop
S Building, Level 8, Room 802 and 803
Event Date: 22/09/2017

Trans-Asia Workshop on the "political" potential of digital communication and social media

The rise of digital communication and social media
has revolutionarily opened up the potential of newly
engendering cross-border alliance, social
movements, activisms and affective publics.
However, what has also been generated is group
polarisation, hate speech and fake news. This
brainstorming workshop aims to revisit the “political”
potential, and limitation, of digital communication
and social media by considering some cases in
Asian contexts.

Presenters

EARVIN CABALQUINTO, Monash University

Topic: Affective Publics (Philippines/diaspora)

DR THOMAS BAUDINETTE, Macquarie University

Topic:  Transnational Sexual Politics in East Asia (Japan-Korea-China)

YACINTA KURNIASIH, Monash University

Topic:  Social-Media and Multilingualism (Indonesia)

Trans-Asia Workshop on "post-imagined-communities"
S801/802, Monash University Caulfield
Event Date: 18/08/2017

Monash Asia Institute

Trans-Asia as method workshop

Approaching the bordering of the nation in a post-imagined-community age

 Date: 12-14:40, 18 August Friday

Venue: S-801/802, Monash University Caulfield campus

 The intensification of cross-border mobility, deepening of cultural diversity within the nation and the evolution of digital media have been drastically changing the landscape of the re-construction of the nation. While nationalism and jingoism are on the rise, the formula of "imagined community" needs to be fundamentally reconsidered. This workshop will discuss with participants how we approach to the bordering of the nation now with an aim to organize a collaborative project.       

Speakers from Monash University.

Prof. Koichi Iwabuchi (MAI)

Associate Prof. Gil Soo-Han (MFJ)

Associate Prof. Julian Millie (SoSS)

Light lunch will be provided.

RSVP to MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu by 15 August

Trans-Asia as Method Workshop
S801 and S801, Level 8, S Building, Monash University Caulfield
Event Date: 18/08/2017

Approaching the bordering of the nation in a post-imagined-community age

The intensification of cross-border mobility,
deepening of cultural diversity within the nation
and the evolution of digital media have been
drastically changing the landscape of the reconstruction
of the nation. While nationalism and
jingoism are on the rise, the formula of “imagined
community” needs to be fundamentally
reconsidered. This workshop will discuss with
participants how we approach to the bordering
of the nation now with an aim to organize a
collaborative project.

Speakers:

Prof Koichi Iwabuchi (MAI)

Assoc Prof Gil Soo-Han (MFJ)

Assoc Prof Julian Millie (SoSS)

Filming the Political, Trespassing Rules and Boundaries
S901 Monash University, Caulfield Campus
Event Date: 24/05/2017

Focus theme seminar_3

Speaker: Ariel Heryanto.  Discussant: Olivia Khoo

 

No  other films have made as great a political impact upon Indonesia as Indonesia Calling 1946 Joris Ivens) and The Act of Killing (2012, Joshua Oppenheimer). Both are products of a trans-national collaboration.  Interestingly, both documentaries were not the films their respective directors had originally planned to make. The opportunity to make these highly celebrated films came by accident only after their film-makers encountered obstacles which stopped or delayed them from making their originally intended films. In this short presentation, we will compare the eventful making of these films, as well as their political significance
that transcend and trespass national boundaries and loyalties

 

 

Key issues on Migration, Diaspora and Belonging for Trans-Asian approaches
Lecture Theatre HB39 Monash Caulfield Campus
Event Date: 28/04/2017

Second seminar_2

Speakers: Gil-Soo Han (Communications and Media Studies)

Mridula Nath Chakrabory (Monash Asia Institute)

Asian Australian Literary-Cultural Production:
changing the narrative
Mridula Nath Chakraborty
In 2016, MAI established a partnership with the
Eltham Bookstore under the aegis of the South Asian
Diaspora International Researchers Network. The
mandate of this partnership was to publicise and
disseminate literature by Asian Australian writers in
the mainstraim. The last six year of this decade have
been very productive in terms of literary production
and building a critical mass for the reception of such
works in the diaspora. This presentation will
examine at how literature provides a specific kind of
lens through which to examine migration, diaspora
and belonging and how it contributes to other
disciplines working in this area.

Multiculturalism in the Australian Cemetery: Wishes and
desires of Chinese immigrants in Melbourne Gil-Soo Han,
Helen Forbes-Mewett and Wilfred Wang
Funeral rites of immigrant populations provide an
understanding of multiculturalism in Australia. Through
interviews with 31 Chinese immigrants and funeral
professionals we show how Chinese immigrants have come
to terms with their level of acculturation and how they have
been embraced by the host society. The immigrants’
preparation and experiences of funeral services and rites
offer them a unique occasion to recognise both a strong
level of maintenance of ethnicity as well as a high level of
integration and satisfaction with Australian society. Also, it is
worth noting a subtle shifting of the attitude towards death
from mourning to celebration.
Gil-Soo will also be talking about his Industry collaborations
in this area of study to provide a road-map for such projects.

EthniCities: The Art of Embracing Diversity
Seoul Global Cultural Center
Event Date: 22/04/2017 - 23/04/2017

EthniCities: The Art of Embracing Diversity

Dates: 22-23 April 2017

Venue: Seoul Global Cultural Center, Myeong-dong, Seoul, South Korea

Organized by TEAM (Trans-East-Asian multiculturalism) and Migrant World TV

Sponsored by The Toyota Foundation Research Grant, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul Global Cultural Center

EthniCities is the platform of a collaborative project of trans-East-Asia multiculturalism (TEAM), funded by Toyota Foundation Research Grant with the leadership of Prof. Koichi Iwabuchi (MAI). The project aims to develop "multiculturalism from below" across East Asia (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong) by forming a cross-border alliance. In the region, the rise of (inter-Asian) migration has made ethno-cultural diversity more intensified and visible. While this has generated national policy discussion to administer cultural diversity, a substantial engagement has not yet made to fairly deal with diversity and make societies more inclusive. This project collaboratively tackles the shared imperative issue of advancing multicultural co-living from a trans-East-Asian perspective.

This is to reorient the discussion and the practice of multiculturalism beyond the framework of the nation-state and from below. Grassroots practices by various actors such as ethnic communities, citizen's groups, NGOs, NPOs and local governments have advanced multiculturalism from below. EthniCities indicates such a de-nationalized local engagement with multicultural questions in the urban and rural areas of East Asia. Working together with those various actors across borders, this project will transnationally further foster "multiculturalism from below" by facilitating the sharing of experiences and collaborative empowerment. We will also design a pedagogical program for social learning to get a wider public involved. This is to institute cultural citizenship through East Asian collaboration to advance social praxis of embracing cultural diversity and nurturing self-reflexive dialogue in society.

Toward this end, we organized the first events titled “Ethnicities: The Art of seeing diversity” in Taipei on 23-24 April 2016 that discussed innovative ways of forging mutual empowerment, cross-border dialogue and citizen’s reciprocal learning. Featuring visual and artistic expression, the first event invited both amateur and professional practitioners from Taiwan, Japan, South Korea and Hong Kong to have a conversation over how such practice is significant for self-empowerment and the promotion of cultural diversity in each society and how we can work together to further develop it in East Asia. Internationally acclaimed film director, Mr. Hou Hsiao Hsien joined us as a commentator.

The 2017 Seoul event titled “EthniCities: The Art of embracing diversity” will further promote East-Asian collaborative engagement to make trans-East-Asian multiculturalism from below as a sustainable long-term project that transnationally nurtures the value of living together in difference in society—the value that has not been well cultivated within the existing framework of the nation-state—and advocates its incorporation into cultural policy of each society. We hope that you join the conversation and work together with all participants to advance a trans-East-Asian collaborative network! Please check the project detail and the update of the event at https://www.facebook.com/EthniCities/?fref=ts

<Program>

22 April (Sat)

10:30 - 11:00 Welcome and Introduction by TEAM (Hyun Mee Kim, Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Korea)

11:00 -13:00 EMPOWERING (NGO/NPO organizers)

Chair: Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash Asia Institute, Monash University, Australia)

                   1) ZULU Kageyama (ART LAB OVA, Yokohama Multicultural Film Festival         organizer, Japan)    

    2) Teresa Kwong (Hong Kong Arts Center, Hong Kong)

    3) Hyesil Jung (Migrant World Television, Korea)

    4) Pei-Chia Lo (Taiwan Women’s Film Association, Taiwan)

 

14:30 - 17:00 PERFORMING Artistic multicultural expressions

Film Showing: “The 21st Century Light of Factory” by mixrice

Chair: Hsiao-Chuan Hsia (Social Transformation Studies, Shih Hsin University, Taiwan)

    1) MC Nam (Vietnamese-Japanese rapper, Japan)

    2) Ricky Chan (Indian-Chinese film actor, Hong Kong)

    3) Shupo Dong (Album producer of TASAT, Taiwan)

    4) Sergelen Gantogoo (GANAA) (Mongol Singer, Korea)

 

23 April (Sun)

10:30 - 12:30 PRACTICING (professional media practitioners and media education)

Chair: Yuko Kawai (Inter-cultural Communications, Rikkyo University, Japan)

    1) Roberto Maxwell (Brazilian documentary filmmaker, Japan)

               2) JB Pun Magar (Nepalese journalist and news editor, Hong Kong)

    3) Pei-hsiang Lee (Radio program host, Taiwan)

    4) Migrant Internet-Radio Broadcasting Groups (MWTV, Korea)

 

13:30- 17:00 pm SHARING (experiences of making visual expressions of one's own voices)

Chair: John N. Erni (Humanities and Creative Writing, Hong Kong Baptist University, HK)

    1: 30- 2:40 : Film Showing

    Short films of four cities (10 minutes each) with a collaged image of "Trans-Asia               Multicultural Situations" created by Joo Wonho (Migrant World Television,       Korea)

2:50-4:50 Discussion among film makers and filmed subjects

                    Commentator: Eric Tsang (Film director, Hong Kong)

     1) Hiroki Bell (film maker) & Sophian Whayeb (filmed subject) (Japan)

     2) Olique Barua (film maker)& Bipin Bishwokarma (filmed subject) (Hong Kong)

    3) Awi Pawan (film maker) & Subject: Chin-chih Hung (filmed subject),            Representative presenter: Marilyn Dino (Member of TASAT Theater) (Taiwan)

    4) Jin Shu(film maker) & Jin Meihong (filmed subject) (Korea)

   5) Abdullaev Ahidjon (film maker) & Students of Seoul On Dream Education Center (Korea)

 

17:15 - 18:00 Debriefing & discussion: Towards further collaboration

Key issues on Diversity, Mobility and Inclusion for Trans-Asian approaches
N105 Monash University Caulfield Campus
Event Date: 31/03/2017

Monash Asia Institute Focus Theme Inaugural Seminar

Key issues on Diversity, Mobility and Inclusion for Trans-Asian approaches

Date & Time: 31 March Friday, 12-2pm (light lunch will be provided)

Venue: N105, Caulfield Campus, Monash University

Speakers:

Julian Millie (Centre for Southeast Asian Studies)

Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash Asia Institute)

In a globalized world in which people's mobility and accompanying human exchange have been intensifying, the promotion of diversity is a key issue. While the current attention to diversity tends to be economy-driven with an emphasis on its utility to make the workplace creative and globally competitive, this seminar will discuss what kind of issues regarding socio-cultural diversity, mobility and inclusion are emergent and need to be critically studied in various parts of Asia and whether and how we can make a comparative examination of Asian cases and/or collaboratively tackle the transnationally shared issues which are distinctly articulated in specific local contexts.

This seminar is an inaugural event of the establishment of MAI focus themes and regional coordinators (please see http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/mai/). Together with focus theme and regional coordinators, we will discuss how to productively promote collaborative research by organizing seminars/conferences and inviting international visiting scholars to Monash.

Please RSVP for catering purpose to MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu by 25 March.

The Spectre of Dying Alone: A Manga of Lonely Death in Japan
Japanese Studies Centre
Event Date: 08/12/2016

Trans-Asia as Method seminar, jointly organised with Japanese Studies Centre

Presenter: Professor Anne Allison Duke University, USA

Discussant: Associate Professor Gil-Soo Han, Monash University


In an era of high aging/low birth-rate demographics, more and more Japanese are older; fewer and fewer are getting married or having children and single households are on the rise. As living alone becomes increasingly the norm, so does dying alone: a prospect that is fed by a flood of news reporting around the phenomenon of bodies discovered days, weeks, even months after a death “unrecognised by anyone else” (kizuite moraenai shi). Generally called solitary or lonely death (koritsushi, kodokushi), how this gets configured in media representations as a state of social abjection (not only for the person dying but also for those left with the mess and smell of their death afterwards) is what I examine in this presentation...

Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP for catering purposes by Monday 5 December 2016. jocelyne.mohamudally@monash.edu

Sleeping Together with Different Dreams?: Japanese Media's Gaze and Representation of Chinese Tourists
Meeting Room, Menzies Building N302
Event Date: 06/10/2016

Trans-Asia as method seminar jointly organized with Japanese Studies Centre

Professor Seongbin Hwang Rikkyo University, Japan

There has been a significant increase of news reports that feature Chinese tourists in Japan since 2012, when Japanese government started monetary easing to significantly devalue the Japanese Yen. However, it is a very peculiar phenomenon to have so many news reports focusing on tourists from a specific nation, China. Why does the Japanese media and its digital public fix their eyes on the Chinese tourists, not the Koreans, the Taiwanese or the European tourists?

Download the flyer for this event... (PDF)

 

Studying Sex and Sexualities: Exploring Trans-Asian Approaches “Let a hundred flowers bloom: Exploring gender and sexual diversity in China and India”
B4.37, Building B, Monash University Caulfiled
Event Date: 25/08/2016

Monash Asia Institute Roundtable Series

Studying Sex and Sexualities: Exploring Trans-Asian Approaches

 

Let a hundred flowers bloom: Exploring gender and sexual diversity in China and India”

 

Time & Date: August 25, 2016, 12-2:00 pm (Thurs)

Venue: Monash University, Caulfield campus, Building B, 4th floor (B4.37)

Light lunch will be provided.

 

This seminar series brings together various scholars from different disciplines to generate discussions on studying issues of sex and sexualities from a trans-Asian perspective. Globalisation has enabled the increasing visibility of trans-border gender and LGBT issues in Asia such as human trafficking, vulnerability to armed conflicts and disasters, violence against women and LGBT, gender/sexuality workplace inequalities and same-sex marriage. Building on the success of the inaugural seminar (insert website hyperlink), this second instalment focuses on critical research around LGBT research in Asia using case studies in China and India. It showcases three research studies that offer novel insights to sex and sexualities in Asia through the lens of language, spatiality and political economy. Importantly, these studies, by interrogating gender and sexual identities in China and India, underscore the great diversity to and research promise in employing a comparative lens to draw out trans-Asian challenges and solutions relating to sex and sexualities.

Each speaker is given fifteen to twenty minutes to discuss the key themes of the roundtable drawing on their research projects, methodologies and disciplinary backgrounds. Each speaker will also respond to other speakers' project from a trans-Asian perspective. The remainder of the time will be allocated for questions and comments from the audience.

 

Moderator: Maria Tanyag (Monash University)

 

Speakers

Dr Mridula Nath Chakraborty (Monash University)

One Gay Ad at a Time: Alternative sexualities and the market in India

Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, which came into force in 1862, criminalises homosexuality. The 15-year battle to repeal the colonial-era statute has been gathering traction in the past couple of years. In July 2009, the Delhi High court decriminalised consensual homosexual acts in private, only for the Supreme Court to recriminalize it in December 2013. Even as there emerges a national consensus that discrimination based on sexual preferences keep India out of step with international developments and political support are in place such as the official declaration of the third gender as ‘transgender’ in April 2014 in a bid to include them within affirmative action governmental policies. These official recognitions and mis-recognitions are now being aided by civil society actions, not only in the community and political arena, but also through neoliberal capital. This paper will look at some of the ways in which the conversation and debate around alternative sexualities is being harnessed by market forces, while the material issues of the constitutional rights languish and heteronormative patriarchal forces become even stronger in contemporary India.

 

Bio

Dr Mridula Nath Chakraborty is Deputy Director of the Monash Asia Institute at Monash University, Melbourne. Mridula has edited Being Bengali: at home and in the world, an enquiry into the intellectual history of this linguistic group from Bangladesh and India (Routledge 2014). She is the co-editor of Abohelaar Bhangon Naame Booke/Broken by Neglect, a bilingual edition of Nunga poet Ali Cobby Eckermann’s poetry from English to Bengali (2014) and A Treasury of Bangla Stories (1997). Most recently, Mridula has convened high-impact projects in literary-cultural diplomacy between Australia and India, such as Australia-India Literatures International Forum (Sydney 2013), the Autumn School in Literary Translation (Kolkata 2013) and Literary Commons: Writing Australia-India in the Asian Century with Indigenous, Dalit and Multilingual Tongues (2014-2015).

 

 

Karen Parker (ARCSHS, La Trobe University)

Language Endangerment as a Public Health Issue: a case study from North East India

North East India is one of the most linguistically diverse parts of the world, with over 200 languages, spoken within an area of 260,000 square kilometres. Adjacent to the mountainous Myanmar border lies the tiny former kingdom of Manipur. Manipur is a small but volatile state, with ongoing issues of tribal warfare, insurgency and political instability. The transgender community in Manipur, known as Nupi Manbi, face many difficulties both as a marginalized social group and as speakers of minority languages. It has long been acknowledged that language endangerment frequently results from forces external to a community, particularly military conflict and the effects of colonization. My work involves working with the community on a language documentation project designed to preserve aspects of their ancient linguistic and cultural practices. In this talk, I discuss how these various political, economic and social factors impact on a minority language community who are further marginalized in terms of their gender identity. I argue that language endangerment issues in this community are related to public health issues and community well-being and mediated by complex gender identities.

 

 

Bio

Karen Parker is a researcher in LGBTI issues at Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) in La Trobe University. Her background is in linguistics and her PhD is a descriptive grammar of a tribal language of Arunachal Pradesh spoken in North East India and Myanmar. Karen’s main area of focus is on the intersection of language, gender and sexuality in the context of contemporary India.

 

Keren Yi (University of Melbourne)

Global Cities/Local Queers: ‘Balinghou’ & ‘Jiulinghou’ Chinese Queer Specificity and its Spatial Articulations

The ‘coming-out’ paradigm is a prevalent narrative in Anglo-American LGBT social movements over the past 40 years, and it upholds a dominant position in a ‘global queer discourse’. In larger metropolitan centres, the proliferation of such rhetoric carried spatial implications and was often accompanied by the maturation of gay villages, neighbourhoods, and other dedicated queer spaces. By contrast, the absence of Mainland China in the early decades of LGBT social movements may explain its lack of safe spaces for the non-heterosexual population during the same period. However, China has ‘opened-up’ since the 1980s. This has resulted in international flows of queer culture and the introduction of knowledge aiding the formation of a hybridized queer subjectivity that is highlighted by both cross-cultural continuities and its unique ‘Chineseness’. My research project offers a re-imagination of the spatiality of queer existence in contemporary Chinese urban centers, and specifically among the post-1980 and post-1990 generations (balinghou and jiulinghou). Drawing on existing literatures and interview sessions with 21 young Chinese gay men, this paper first examines the forms and availabilities of spaces for queer socialization in several large Chinese cities. Second, it considers the impact of Internet-enabled new media; how it alters the conception of public/private, ’closetedness’/’outness’, and creates new spaces for socialization and identity articulation for this generation of queer digital natives. Last, it proposes to open a conversation on the spatial implications of ‘global queer discourses’ and Chinese socio-cultural specificities on the young Chinese queer subjects, as well as how they produce new forms of queer mobility.

 

Bio

Keren is a postgraduate student at the School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne. His research interests include gender and sexuality, social media, and Asian cultural studies.