Asian woman in ethnic clothes driving a motorcycle with a dog

Japanese Studies Centre Postgraduate Seminar

Asian woman in ethnic clothes driving a motorcycle with a dog
Map Unavailable

Date/Time
Date(s) - 21/05/2014
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Location
JSC Auditorium, Building 54 (next to the bus loop),

Category(ies)


Japanese Studies Centre Postgraduate Seminar

 Seminar Chair: Thomas Baudinette

Motorbike and kimono569917781. Jenny Hall (Anthropology)

‘How to make kimono ride a bicycle: cultural and sensory approaches to contemporary Japanese textile design’

Kimono are not considered suitable for contemporary life in Japan—it is difficult to even ride a bicycle while wearing a kimono. Because of this there is a pervading view that the Japanese traditional textile industry is in decline. However, Japanese designers and consumers are redefining Japanese clothing while retaining its ‘traditional’ image. This project investigates how the reinvention of Japanese clothing embodies the process by which tradition and modernity interact with each other and helps us understand how these new designs represent a vehicle for designers’ and consumers’ expressions of Japanese culture.

 

 

2. Adam Zulawnik (Translation Studies)

‘Translating controversial documents- Manga Kenkanryū (Hate the Korean Wave)

Using the controversial manga Kenkanryū (Hate the Korean Wave) by Sharin Amano, this project proposes a new approach to understanding and managing the complicated aspect of translation of controversy, a discourse that is bound to gain raised attention with growing interaction between cultures. In particular, this project seeks to address what is meant by controversy and to discuss the importance of translating controversial texts.

3. Gwyn McLelland (Religious Studies)

‘Dangerous memories in Nagasaki: On the boundary between theology and history’

This oral history project tests the theological motif of “dangerous memory” in the Christian community of Nagasaki and their remembrance of the atomic bombing at the “end of the war.” The project seeks to decentre discussions from Hiroshima and engages with the writings of Takashi Nagai on the bombing of Nagasaki.

Please join us in welcoming our postgraduate students in presenting their work at the May JSC seminar!

 

Lunch will be provided – RSVPs appreciated but not required!

japanese-studies-centre@monash.edu