Conferences

  • Call for papers: International Conference

     OTHER ASIANS, ASIA’S OTHERING-Inclusionary Utopias, Exclusionary Politics

     Organized by Monash Asia Institute, Monash University

     30 & 31 October 2017

    Monash University Caulfield Campus, Melbourne

    Monash Asia Institute (MAI) is pleased to welcome submissions of paper abstracts for its Conference on “OTHER ASIANS, ASIA’S OTHERING; Inclusionary Utopias, Exclusionary Politics” on 30-31 October 2017. The conference will open with a public keynote address by Professor Krishna Sen (The University of Western Australia) in the evening of 30 October 2017. On the next day, there will be three panel sessions, each focussing on one of the MAI central research themes for 2017 (see below). Overall, the conference deals with two distinct but related issues; empirical observation and questions of method: recent changes in Asia and the challenge of analysing these changes.

    CHANGES IN ASIA: Asia has changed dramatically in multiple dimensions in the past three decades, of which the speed and scope of demographic mobility and cultural fluidity, are some of the most striking. We witness the escalation and intensification of mobility, diversity and connectivity in relation to newly configured politics of inclusion/exclusion. Why and how politics of race has gained momentum for a while in some circles, while politics of religion, gender, or class gained more currency in other times or social settings? Where and when do they intersect, blend, or contradict across Asia and over trans-Asia? 

    STUDYING ASIA: Ironically, when such rapid changes are taking place across Asia and require fresh analyses and comprehension, formal training in “Asian studies” in schools and universities outside Asia has been in serious decline or under institutional threat. Where such studies survive, there has been a significant rise of Asians studying Asia outside Asia, including Australia in its multiple framework and focus: studying Asia ‘in’ Australia, studying ‘Asians in Australia’ and studying ‘Australia as part of Asia’. What does it mean to study Asia in the new millennium? How and why the Cold War-styled “Asian studies” has been outdated; how today’s Asia poses institutional and methodological challenges to studying Asia, in and/or outside Asia? How can trans-Asia approaches contribute to the debate?

    We will welcome papers examining MAI’s three key themes: 1) Migrants, Diaspora & Identity politics; 2) Mobility, Diversity & Inclusion; 3) Media and cultural practices, although proposals that are in other intriguing ways relevant to the conference topic will also be considered. Papers can focus on a single nation or metropolitan area in Asia, but priority will be given to papers with focus on trans-Asian issues, international dimension of a local issue, a comparative perspective of more than one nation, or innovative insights into the future of studying Asia in Australia. Innovative approaches and new interrogations of methods of studying Asia are most welcome. Early Career Researches are strongly encouraged.

    Please submit your proposed title, abstract (200 words max), and brief biodata (50 words max) to <MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu> by 15 July 2017. Please clearly put “Paper proposal for OTHER ASIANS, ASIA’S OTHERING” in the subject line. Acceptance of proposals will be notified by the end of July.

    Any enquiries should be directed to MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu. 

    We look forward to receiving your proposals. 

    Koichi Iwabuchi, Ariel Heryanto, Mridula Nath Chakraborty, Julian Millie (Co-conveners)

    Monash Asia Institute, Monash University

     

  • MAI is pleased to announce that we support the 6th Asian Australian Identities Conference of the Asian Australian Studies Research Network, which will be held in October 2017. Please see the details via below link.

    Embodiments and Inhabitations -The 6th Asian Australian Identities (AAI6) conference of the Asian Australian Studies Research Network

    25-26 October 2017, Immigration Museum, Melbourne

     

     

  • In addition to regular seminar series organised by the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, the Japanese Studies Centre, the National Centre for South Asian Studies, and the Centre for Malaysian Studies, MAI provides international conferences and seminar series.

 

Other Asians, Asia's Otherings
Monash University, Caulfield Campus
Event Date: 30/10/2017 - 31/10/2017

Inclusionary Utopias, Exclusionary Politics

Call for Papers

30 & 31 October 2017

Monash University Caulfield Campus, Melbourne

Monash Asia Institute (MAI) is pleased to welcome submissions of paper abstracts for its Conference on “OTHER ASIANS, ASIA’S OTHERING; Inclusionary Utopias, Exclusionary Politics” on 30-31 October 2017. The conference will open with a public keynote address by Professor Krishna Sen (The University of Western Australia) in the evening of 30 October 2017. On the next day, there will be three panel sessions, each focussing on one of the MAI central research themes for 2017 (see below). Overall, the conference deals with two distinct but related issues; empirical observation and questions of method: recent changes in Asia and the challenge of analysing these changes.

CHANGES IN ASIA: Asia has changed dramatically in multiple dimensions in the past three decades, of which the speed and scope of demographic mobility and cultural fluidity are some of the most striking. We witness the escalation and intensification of mobility, diversity and connectivity in relation to newly configured politics of inclusion/exclusion. Why and how politics of race has gained momentum for a while in some circles, while politics of religion, gender, or class gained more currency in other times or social settings? Where and when do they intersect, blend, or contradict across Asia and over trans-Asia?

STUDYING ASIA: Ironically, when such rapid changes taking place across Asia and require fresh analyses and comprehension, formal training “Asian studies” in schools and universities outside Asia has been in serious decline or under institutional threat. Where such studies survive, there has been a significant rise of Asians studying Asia outside Asia, including Australia in its multiple framework and focus: studying Asia ‘in’ Australia, studying ‘Asians in Australia’ and studying ‘Australia as part of Asia’. What does it mean to study Asia in the new millennium? How and why the Cold War-styled “Asian studies” has been outdated; how today’s Asia poses institutional and methodological challenges to studying Asia, in and/or outside Asia? How can trans-Asia approaches contribute to the debate?

We will welcome papers examining MAI's three key themes: 1) Migrants, Diaspora & Identity politics; 2) Mobility, Diversity & Inclusion; 3) Media and cultural practices, although proposals that are in other intriguing ways relevant to the conference topic will also be considered. Papers can focus on a single nation or metropolitan area in Asia, but priority will be given to papers with focus on trans-Asian issues, international dimension of a local issue, a comparative perspective of more than one nation, or innovative insights into the future of studying Asia in Australia. Innovative approaches and new interrogations of methods of studying Asia are most welcome. Early Career Researches are strongly encouraged.

Please submit your proposed title, abstract (200 words max), and brief biodata (50 words max) to <MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu> by 15 July 2017. Please clearly put “Paper proposal for OTHER ASIANS, ASIA’S OTHERING” in the subject line. Acceptance of proposals will be notified by the end of July.

 

Any enquiries should be directed to MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu.

We look forward to receiving your proposals.

Koichi Iwabuchi, Ariel Heryanto, Mridula Nath Chakraborty, Julian Millie (Co-conveners)

Monash Asia Institute, Monash University

 

Past events

Migrant Diplomacy Australia-Japan Museum Exchange to Foster Cultural Diversity
The Theatrette, Immigration Museum
Event Date: 19/05/2017

Organised by Monash Asia Institute, Monash University with partnership of Immigration Museum, Melbourne and Immigration Museum Tokyo (pilot program)

eduWith the intensification of human mobility and migration, the fostering of cultural diversity and inclusion is a key issue in a globalized world. Japan is no exception. Featuring Immigration Museum in Melbourne and Immigration Museum Tokyo (pilot project), whose establishment was inspired by the former, this symposium will discuss the significant role of the museum in promoting cultural diversity and inclusion in multicultural cities. We will discuss how to promote exchange and build up collaborative relations between Immigration Museum in Melbourne and Immigration Museum Tokyo and advance Australia-Japan bilateral relations on common ground of trans-Asian migration and cultural diversity.
This symposium is part of the project, Migrant Diplomacy: Exchange between Immigration Museum in Melbourne and Tokyo, which is supported by the Australian Government through the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Migrant diplomacy-1

EthniCities: The Art of Embracing Diversity
Seoul Global Cultural Center
Event Date: 22/04/2017 - 23/04/2017

EthniCities: The Art of Embracing Diversity

Dates: 22-23 April 2017

Venue: Seoul Global Cultural Center, Myeong-dong, Seoul, South Korea

Organized by TEAM (Trans-East-Asian multiculturalism) and Migrant World TV

Sponsored by The Toyota Foundation Research Grant, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul Global Cultural Center

EthniCities is the platform of a collaborative project of trans-East-Asia multiculturalism (TEAM), funded by Toyota Foundation Research Grant with the leadership of Prof. Koichi Iwabuchi (MAI). The project aims to develop "multiculturalism from below" across East Asia (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong) by forming a cross-border alliance. In the region, the rise of (inter-Asian) migration has made ethno-cultural diversity more intensified and visible. While this has generated national policy discussion to administer cultural diversity, a substantial engagement has not yet made to fairly deal with diversity and make societies more inclusive. This project collaboratively tackles the shared imperative issue of advancing multicultural co-living from a trans-East-Asian perspective.

This is to reorient the discussion and the practice of multiculturalism beyond the framework of the nation-state and from below. Grassroots practices by various actors such as ethnic communities, citizen's groups, NGOs, NPOs and local governments have advanced multiculturalism from below. EthniCities indicates such a de-nationalized local engagement with multicultural questions in the urban and rural areas of East Asia. Working together with those various actors across borders, this project will transnationally further foster "multiculturalism from below" by facilitating the sharing of experiences and collaborative empowerment. We will also design a pedagogical program for social learning to get a wider public involved. This is to institute cultural citizenship through East Asian collaboration to advance social praxis of embracing cultural diversity and nurturing self-reflexive dialogue in society.

Toward this end, we organized the first events titled “Ethnicities: The Art of seeing diversity” in Taipei on 23-24 April 2016 that discussed innovative ways of forging mutual empowerment, cross-border dialogue and citizen’s reciprocal learning. Featuring visual and artistic expression, the first event invited both amateur and professional practitioners from Taiwan, Japan, South Korea and Hong Kong to have a conversation over how such practice is significant for self-empowerment and the promotion of cultural diversity in each society and how we can work together to further develop it in East Asia. Internationally acclaimed film director, Mr. Hou Hsiao Hsien joined us as a commentator.

The 2017 Seoul event titled “EthniCities: The Art of embracing diversity” will further promote East-Asian collaborative engagement to make trans-East-Asian multiculturalism from below as a sustainable long-term project that transnationally nurtures the value of living together in difference in society—the value that has not been well cultivated within the existing framework of the nation-state—and advocates its incorporation into cultural policy of each society. We hope that you join the conversation and work together with all participants to advance a trans-East-Asian collaborative network! Please check the project detail and the update of the event at https://www.facebook.com/EthniCities/?fref=ts

<Program>

22 April (Sat)

10:30 - 11:00 Welcome and Introduction by TEAM (Hyun Mee Kim, Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Korea)

11:00 -13:00 EMPOWERING (NGO/NPO organizers)

Chair: Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash Asia Institute, Monash University, Australia)

                   1) ZULU Kageyama (ART LAB OVA, Yokohama Multicultural Film Festival         organizer, Japan)    

    2) Teresa Kwong (Hong Kong Arts Center, Hong Kong)

    3) Hyesil Jung (Migrant World Television, Korea)

    4) Pei-Chia Lo (Taiwan Women’s Film Association, Taiwan)

 

14:30 - 17:00 PERFORMING Artistic multicultural expressions

Film Showing: “The 21st Century Light of Factory” by mixrice

Chair: Hsiao-Chuan Hsia (Social Transformation Studies, Shih Hsin University, Taiwan)

    1) MC Nam (Vietnamese-Japanese rapper, Japan)

    2) Ricky Chan (Indian-Chinese film actor, Hong Kong)

    3) Shupo Dong (Album producer of TASAT, Taiwan)

    4) Sergelen Gantogoo (GANAA) (Mongol Singer, Korea)

 

23 April (Sun)

10:30 - 12:30 PRACTICING (professional media practitioners and media education)

Chair: Yuko Kawai (Inter-cultural Communications, Rikkyo University, Japan)

    1) Roberto Maxwell (Brazilian documentary filmmaker, Japan)

               2) JB Pun Magar (Nepalese journalist and news editor, Hong Kong)

    3) Pei-hsiang Lee (Radio program host, Taiwan)

    4) Migrant Internet-Radio Broadcasting Groups (MWTV, Korea)

 

13:30- 17:00 pm SHARING (experiences of making visual expressions of one's own voices)

Chair: John N. Erni (Humanities and Creative Writing, Hong Kong Baptist University, HK)

    1: 30- 2:40 : Film Showing

    Short films of four cities (10 minutes each) with a collaged image of "Trans-Asia               Multicultural Situations" created by Joo Wonho (Migrant World Television,       Korea)

2:50-4:50 Discussion among film makers and filmed subjects

                    Commentator: Eric Tsang (Film director, Hong Kong)

     1) Hiroki Bell (film maker) & Sophian Whayeb (filmed subject) (Japan)

     2) Olique Barua (film maker)& Bipin Bishwokarma (filmed subject) (Hong Kong)

    3) Awi Pawan (film maker) & Subject: Chin-chih Hung (filmed subject),            Representative presenter: Marilyn Dino (Member of TASAT Theater) (Taiwan)

    4) Jin Shu(film maker) & Jin Meihong (filmed subject) (Korea)

   5) Abdullaev Ahidjon (film maker) & Students of Seoul On Dream Education Center (Korea)

 

17:15 - 18:00 Debriefing & discussion: Towards further collaboration

CFP: Trans-Asia Human Mobilities and Encounters
chularongkorn university
Event Date: 23/01/2017 - 24/01/2017

CALL FOR PAPER

Trans-Asia Human Mobilities and Encounters: Exchange, Commodification and Sustainability

 23 - 24 January 2017

Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok

 Organized by 

Monash Asia Institute, Monash University & Institute of Asian Studies, Chulalongkorn University

(http://www.ias.chula.ac.th/ias/th/News-Activities-Detail.php?id=56)

Conveners:

Koichi Iwabuchi (MAI, Monash) & Nualnoi Treerat (IAS, Chulalongkorn)

The rise of the middle class in many parts of Asia has been intensifying people's cross-border mobility within the region. While regional labor migration and human trafficking have been significant issues that much attract the academic concern, this conference aims to critically examine other kinds of growing human mobility and encounter within and across Asia such as tourism, educational exchange and retiree temporary migration. As tourism in Asia has developed to include much wider ranges of activities other than sight-seeing, shopping and eating, we are observing the various kinds of activities being incorporated into trans-Asia touristic mobility and experience - heritage tourism, ecotourism, dark tourism, volunteer tourism, activism tourism, LGBT tourism, art tourism, medical tourism, night life tourism, sport tourism, pop-culture tourism, and so on. Also much expanding is the mobility of Asian students who study abroad and join international exchange and internship programs including working holidays, in which young people stay for few weeks to one year in other Asian countries. Many elder people in Asia also spend shorter and longer periods abroad to participate in educational courses such as language and cooking, or temporally migrate to other Asian countries after retirement. These developments of intra-regional human mobility within and across Asia have newly highlighted the issues regarding the opportunities for cross-cultural exchange, dialogue and antagonism, the commodification of mobility experiences and socio-economic and environmental sustainability.

 

Trans-Asia Human Mobilities and Encounters aims to critically examine these issues and facilitate cross-regional and interdisciplinary exchange among researchers working on them in the disciplines and fields of cultural studies, anthropology, sociology, geography, intercultural communication, critical tourism studies, and so on.

 

Suggested topics 

Key topics to be discussed include:

*How trans-Asia human mobilities facilitates encounter and exchange between people of diverse socio-cultural backgrounds and whether and how it engenders cross-cultural dialogue, everyday cosmopolitanism and/or cultural othering and oriental Orientalism (e.g., with the rise of Chinese tourists)

*How it generates the commodification of experiences of mobility and encounters of other Asian people, culture and place by the development of mobility industries of tourism, education and retirement

*How it newly promotes the commercialized branding of the nation, place, event and heritage, engendering modes of competitive renationalization

*How it brings about new problems to local communities in terms of environmental and socio-economic issues

*How social media uses blur the physical and virtual experiences of human mobility and complicate the entangled relationship between "here" and "there"

*How these new trans-Asian mobilities have an impact on cultural diversity and multiculturalism in countries of destination, for example in terms of the recognition and lives of diasporic communities, the re-development of ethnic towns and the employment of foreign national migrants and students

*How it has also advanced Asian diaspora and migrants' visit and transnational connection to "home" and how it has an impact on diasporic identification

 

The above list is not exclusive and we will consider the proposals that critically examine other relevant issues related to trans-Asian human mobilities and encounters.

 

Submitting a Proposal by 31 May 2016

Create a detailed title page for your submission. The title page must include title of the submission, topic areas of the submission, and paper author(s). For EACH author, list the following:

  • Full Name
  • Department/Division
  • University/Organisation
  • Email Address (all acceptance/rejection letters are sent via email.)

Email your proposal of 200-300 words, along with the above described title page, to: transasia.conf@gmail.com. Receipt of submissions will be acknowledged within 72 hours.

The conference format will be discussion-oriented and all presenters will give a concise talk of the main points for 15 minutes. Presenters are expected to submit draft papers in advance to pre-circulate them among presenters.

Important Dates

Proposal Submission Deadline

31 May 2016

Notification of Acceptance

30 June 2016

Registration Deadline

30 December 2016

Paper Submission Deadline

10 January 2017

Conference Date

23-24 January 2017

 

CFP Chula 2017 

 

 

The 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference ***PROGRAM UPLOADED!***
Lecture Theatre HB39 Monash Caulfield Campus
Event Date: 11/12/2016 - 12/12/2016

CFP: The 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne (Australia)

Date: 11-12 December 2016, (Sunday-Monday)

Venue: Monash Asia Institute (MAI), Monash University, Caulfield Campus

900 Dandenong Road, Caulfield East, Victoria 3145, Australia (Melway Ref: 68 F1)

* For information on travelling to Caulfield campus (how to get to, parking and map), please visit Monash University Caulfield campus and Google Maps.  Getting Therewill be helpful to travel Melbourne.

PROGRAM UPLOADED!

Organized by:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group),

Monash Asia Institute & School of Media, Film and Journalism, , Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

REGISTER

KEY NOTE SPEAKER: Andy Bennett (Griffith University)

Music (Post)subcultures and Scenes in Asia: Towards a Rethinking of Concepts and Theories

PLENARY SESSION: Koichi Iwabuchi (Manash University), Shane Homan (Monash University) et al.

Australia in Inter-Asian Pop Music Flows/connections

Everyday Multiculturalism and Trans-Asian Mobilities (closed workshop)
Building H, 2nd Floor (H220 and H222)
Event Date: 27/10/2016 - 28/10/2016

Everyday Multiculturalism and Trans-Asian Mobilities

A two-day workshop co-hosted by the Monash Asia Institute and the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation

Dates: 27-28 October, 2016

Location: Monash University, Caulfield Campus, Melbourne

This workshop seeks to challenge assumptions and reinvigorate discussions about how we empirically and methodologically examine everyday multiculturalism in the context of Asian countries, Asian migrants in Australia, and increasing trans-Asian mobilities. It will bring together key scholars who conduct research on multiculturalism with a specific focus on Asian contexts and experiences of living in diversity. The workshop’s outcome will be an edited collection and hence only a small number of well-developed, high quality papers can be accepted.

In response to previous top-down policy approaches to cultural diversity, everyday multiculturalism research places importance on understanding how people live with and among ‘difference’ in mundane (and extraordinary) ways in familiar contexts. This research has raised important empirical, methodological and ontological questions about how we conceptualise both the ‘everyday’ and what constitutes the kind of ‘working multiculturalism’ that enables people to live well with difference. These inquiries increasingly include questions about the transferability of such ideas across the region and their application and meaning in different local contexts, especially in the context of expanding trans-Asian mobilities.

In this workshop, and the edited book that it will produce, we aim to explore theoretical and methodological considerations for capturing ‘everyday’ practices in different social and cultural Asian contexts where multiculturalism as policy has not been substantially developed, and related to this, how the ‘experience’ of ‘multiculturalism’ can be localised, contextualised and embodied in ways that are not necessarily spatially and temporally bounded by conventional geographical boundaries. We aim to consider how the particularity of place (including nation, city and field site) matters, and how people’s mobility and/or emplacement shapes and potentially transforms how we conceptualise the lived practice of multiculturalism. Of relevance are differences and continuities between everyday multiculturalism in urban versus non-urban places, global/peripheral cities, and the specific affordances of different field sites (e.g. classrooms and workplaces; streets, beaches and public spaces; malls, cafes and commercial sites; civic associations, community groups and other spaces of the public sphere; social media and cultural productions, etc).

The papers will form the basis for an edited book and thus need to adhere closely to the core focus of the workshop. Only a small number of papers can be selected. We invite you to submit an abstract that concerns one or more of the following themes:

1 Diverse patterns/forms of everyday multiculturalism in Asian contexts (without established multiculturalism policy)

2 Asian migrants, Asian/Australian encounters and everyday multiculturalism in Australia (where multiculturalism policy has been well established)

3 Intensifying trans-Asian mobilities, transient migration and ‘everydayness’ on the move

Each paper should discuss the following issues (if not all):

  • Theoretical considerations of the ‘everyday’ and its relevance
  • Methodological approaches to studying the ‘everyday’
  • Examining trans-Asian mobilities of the ‘everyday’
  • Intimacy and embodiment in ‘everyday’ interactions/communications

Please send your abstract (150 – 300 words) describing the proposed paper and a brief bio (100 words) to: mai-enquiries@monash.edu (please include the subject line ‘Everyday Multiculturalism’) by May 30, 2016. For consideration for the edited collection, the final paper will need to be approximately 6,000 words in length and a draft will need to be ready for circulation to participants prior to the workshop.

Please be aware that no funding is available for travel support. There will be no fee for registration.

Prof Koichi Iwabuchi, Monash Asia Institute

Prof Anita Harris, Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation

Dr Jessica Walton, Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation

 

The 7th Asian Translation Traditions Conference (Malaysia)
Monash University Malaysia,
Event Date: 26/09/2016 - 29/09/2016

 

 

The 7th Asian Translation Traditions Conference

Capture

Shifting Powers: The Ethics of Translation in a Transforming Asia

26th-29th September 2016, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

This conference seeks to interrogate the role of translators in, and of, Asia as participants in, and commentators on, a changing world. Translators minimise or break down barriers between the ‘I’, ‘you’, ‘we’ and ‘Other’, and in doing so, create inclusive local, regional and global experiences and life trajectories for consumers of linguistic and cultural artefacts. Yet, translation can also be an exclusive process: decisions about what is translated, how and for whom, have far-reaching implications for the inclusion and exclusion of certain communities and/or stakeholders, simultaneously empowering some and disempowering others.

This conference seeks to explore the ethics of translation in a transforming Asia from the perspective of Asian Translation Traditions (ATT): for further information, please check the website.

 

Keynote Speakers
Li Wei
Vicente L. Rafael
Ronit Ricci

Contact Us
E-Mail Contact: arts-asiantranslation@monash.edu

 

Registration details will be available soon.


Partners
Monash University Malaysia
Universiti Kebangsan Malaysia
Migration, Identity, and Translation Network (MITN)

 

Dr Aneesh Pradhan - ICCR Public Lecture on India
Consulate General of India in Melbourne
Event Date: 27/08/2016

Monash Asia Institute with Indian Council for Cultural Relations presents Dr Aneesh Pradhan's ICCR Public Lecture on India

'Courtesans and Hereditary Musicians in a Colonial Setting: Practitioners of Hindustani Music in Bombay'

27 August 2016
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Consulate General of India in Melbourne
344, St Kilda Road
Melbourne, VIC 3004

Abstract

Before the nineteenth century, Hindustani music was performed and practised almost exclusively by hereditary musicians, who were tied to, and patronised by, aristocratic courts and religious institutions. The consequences of coloniality, the arrival of modernity and the assertion of Hindu nationalism spelt the beginning of the end for this centuries-old social organisation of music. New sources of patronage from mercantile and industrial classes in colonial centres, such as Bombay (now Mumbai), fundamentally and rapidly changed the ways in which Hindustani music was socially organised, performed and taught. The advent of the gramophone and sound recordings intensified this experience and generated a whole series of fundamental challenges that profoundly affected the lives and livelihood of long-standing communities of hereditary musicians, amongst whom were significant numbers of female artists, the courtesans.

This lecture will focus attention on the living and working conditions of hereditary musicians and courtesans in colonial Bombay and the resilience they displayed in the most trying of circumstances. Discussion will connect contemporary developments in Hindustani music with these profound historical issues and will include Dr Aneesh Pradhan's personal reflections as a performer and researcher.

View Dr Aneesh Pradhan's tabla performance video...

Register for Dr Aneesh Prahan's public lecture here...

 

Biography

Monash University is honoured to welcome Dr Aneesh Pradhan as Chair in Indian Studies from Indian Council for Cultural Relations (http://www.iccr.gov.in) at the Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music.

Dr Pradhan is one of India's leading tabla players. He is a disciple of Pandit Nikhil Ghosh from whom he inherited a considerable repertoire of traditional tabla solo compositions from the Delhi, Ajrada, Lucknow, Farrukhabad and Punjab gharanas. A doctorate from the University of Mumbai, he is a keen researcher of trends in performance, music education and patronage that unfolded in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century, a period that continues to fascinate him. Dr Pradhan has authored a children's book on tabla, part of a forthcoming twelve book series entitled Baajaa Gaajaa: Musical Instruments of India and Tabla: A Performer's Perspective. He has been awarded a medal by the Asiatic Society of Mumbai for his book Hindustani Music in Colonial Bombay. His latest ebook, Hindustani Music: Ways of Listening, is a collection of articles from Scroll.in, a digital publication. He has directed and produced a short film entitled Pratidhvani: Reverberations of the Nanasaheb Panse Pakhawaj Tradition.

Dr Pradhan is Director of Underscore Records Pvt. Ltd, an independent online record label (http://underscorerecords.com/). He also co-curates with vocalist Shubha Mudgal, an international music festival called Baajaa Gaajaa: Music from 21st Century India. Based in Mumbai, India, Aneesh Pradhan lives a life that affords him the chance to be in turns, performer, composer, student, teacher, researcher, and author.

Dr Pradhan's books will be available at the event courtesy Eltham Bookshop.

Programme

2:45 PM Registration
3:00 PM Welcome
3:15 PM Lecture: Courtesans and Hereditary Musicians in a Colonial Setting: Practitioners of Hindustani Music in Bombay
4:15 PM Chai and Refreshments
5:00 PM Close

Diaspora Diplomacy
ACJC Seminar rooms, Building H, 8th floor (H8.06)
Event Date: 12/04/2016

Monash Asia Institute presents:
Diaspora Diplomacy

Featuring two internationally renowned scholars, this seminar will discuss cultural diplomacy in its
refreshing perspective by considering the implications of cultural diplomacy for diaspora. Prof.
Yudhishthir Raj Isar will give a talk about an Indian case and Prof. Jacqueline Lo will respond to his
argument with some reference to the cases of Asian-Australians.

Speakers:
Prof. Yudhishthir Raj Isar
(The American University of Paris)


Discussant:
Prof. Jacqueline Lo
(Australian National University)

 

Cultural diplomacy: an Indian exception?
Prof. Yudhishthir
In preference to ‘cultural diplomacy’, the Indian policy and foreign affairs elites believe in and
practice ‘international cultural relations’. For them, this is a form of cultural noblesse oblige, based
on a self-conscious awareness of the richness of India’s plural civilization. These cultural relations
are also oriented in considerable measure to the Indian diaspora rather than to foreign interlocutors
as such. The presentation will explore the genesis and unfolding of this Indian exception. The arts
and heritage were seen as intrinsic to the national brand image even before the country’s
independence in 1947. Just three years after the establishment of the Republic in 1950, the Indian
Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) was created under the aegis of the ministry of education,
before being shifted to the external affairs portfolio in the 1960s. The presentation will unpack the
functioning of the ICCR and the ways in which the country’s non-state actors operate in symbiosis
with, or separately from this body. It will also consider, however, how focused branding objectives
marked the ambitious ‘Festivals of India’ personally initiated by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi in the
1980s, as well as the short heyday of an innovative style of public diplomacy introduced in the
foreign ministry in the early twenty-first century. Some of these efforts refer to the ‘soft power’
paradigm that reigns in most countries today – the term is slowly gaining a foothold in India as well.
Finally, the presentation will examine how the cultural discourse per se has been trumped by the
global populism of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, elected in 2014.

 

Light refreshment will be provided.

To RSVP please click here...

 

 

 

MAI INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE (closed): Asian migration and rooted transnationalism

Event Date: 19/11/2015 - 20/11/2015

International Closed Workshop

Asian migration and rooted-transnationalism

When and how transnational connections matter?

 

Organized by Monash Asia Institute, Monash University

 

19-20 November 2015

 Monash University, Caulfield campus

  With the intensification of migration and cross-border communications and mobility, transnationalism has been much examined in the last two decades, studied mostly in terms of migrants’ and diaspora’s physical and imaginative connections with “home”. However, recent discussion puts more emphasis on the intersection between transnationalism and integration to the host society. This workshop aims to intensively discuss when and how transnationalism matters to locally rooted mundane practices of migrants/diaspora from Asian regions, living both inside and outside Asia. It aims to explore the following questions:

  • Whether and how identification (and individualized non-identification) with ethnic and national communities, the sense of belonging to multiple societies, everyday multiculturalism, self-empowerment against marginalization, and urban conviviality (and inter-Asian interactions) are associated with and engendered by mediated and physical transnational connections and practices;
  • How these differently manifest themselves according to intersecting social attributes such as generation, age, gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity, education, work;
  • How transnationalism should be re-defined and approached in the age of super-diversity, super-mobility and super-connectivity, and how notions such as translocalism might be utilised?

Please send your paper proposals (less than 300 words) with your affiliation details and e-mail address no later than 30 JUNE to: MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu
Please clearly put “Paper proposal for Transnationalism and Asia” in the subject line. Acceptance of proposal will be notified around the end of July. Please kindly be advised that we will not be able to offer financial support for participants’ travel costs. There will be no registration fees for the workshop. You can find more details of the workshop and the venue at the webpage of Monash Asia Institute: http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/mai/ We look very much forward to receiving your proposals! Koichi Iwabuchi, Gil-Soo Han & Anita Harris (Conveners)

2015 MAI Annual International Conference in TAIPEI: ALL I NEED IS LOVE?: Nation, Affect and Aversion in a Post-Imagined-Community Asia
National Taiwan Normal University
Event Date: 23/10/2015 - 24/10/2015

2015 MAI Annual International Conferences

All I Need Is Love? Nation, Affect and Aversion in a Post-Imagined-Community Asia

23-24 Oct  2015 at National Taiwan Normal University

Organized by: Graduate Institute of Mass Communication, National Taiwan Normal University & Monash Asia Institute, Monash University

Program

Conference poster image

  We are observing the rise of salient expression of love and loyalty for the nation and comparable communities—accompanied often by the display of aversion against various “others.” Jingoistic thinking and action are justified in the name of national interest and dignity; criticisms of the nation-state are met with suspicion, even condemnation. In such an atmosphere, the state subtly looks for opportunities to reclaim its legitimacy. Yet a twisted sense of pride and victimhood generated among people can easily turn its back on the state. Socio-economic predicament and reformulated historical knowledge are just some triggers behind such new affective modes of belonging. Moreover, civil society and network mediation played pivotal and complex roles in the rise of nation-related affect and aversion. Often, a supreme attachment to nation-states and to other ethno-religious, communal identifications became favored at the cost of cosmopolitan engagement with cultural diversity in our globalizing world. This workshop brings the above concerns in the Asian and inter-Asian contexts under focus and intensive discussion. Some questions we hope to understand better are as follows: What are the driving forces behind the expression and performance of nation-related affect and aversion in contemporary Asia? How is this attempt at identification different from a representational paradigm of imagined communities as well as from the conventional understanding of nationalism and patriotism? How does aversion against imagined “others” turn into an attack against marginalized people within the nation (such as ethno-racial minorities, recent migrants, and those who have sympathy with an Asian country under attack)? How has the vicious circle of inter-Asian jingoism been generated with the rise of China, the popularity of Korean media culture and lingering issues of Japanese colonial history? How have the states in Asia responded to various affective developments? How have social media and internet communication mobilized nation-related affect and aversion, and how have people intervened? Is it possible to foster inclusiveness and cosmopolitan action without negating affective attachment to nation-states? How and whether would transnational collaboration work as an effective method of intervention? Confirmed speakers include: Ien Ang (University of Western Sydney), Kim Hyun Mee (Yonsei University), Kwai-Cheung Lo (Hong Kong Baptist University), Eva Tsai (National Taiwan Normal University), and Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash University). We plan to publish an edited volume from the papers presented at the symposium through Asian Cultural Studies: Transnational and Dialogic Approaches, a new book series by Rowman & Littlefield International. We invite interested presenters to send a 300-word paper proposal to MAI-Enquiries@monash.edu by 15 April 2015. Please include a paper title, an abstract, and a short biography of the author with affiliation and contact information. In the email subject line, please clearly indicate “PAPER PROPOSAL FOR TAIPEI OCTOBER WORKSHOP.” The selection result will be notified in mid-May. Please kindly be advised that we will not be able to offer financial support for participants’ travel expenses. There will be no registration fees for the workshop. We look forward to receiving your proposals!  

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