Honours translation projects

The discipline of Translation and Interpreting Studies is not offered at Honours level. However, language major students with an interest in scholarly aspects of translation can choose to include a translation component as part of an LLCL Honours Thesis in their language discipline.

Students wishing to obtain a professional qualification in preparation for a career as a translator or interpreter are encouraged to consider the Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies as an alternative or addition to Honours.

Consultation

If you are interested in undertaking a translation-related project, you should consult with a staff member(s) in your language major and/or translation studies who is able to supervise your project. You may also speak to the Honours Coordinator in the relevant language discipline if you are unsure of which staff member(s) to approach.  

The options below are offered as a starting point for discussion with your potential supervisor on how to incorporate a translation element into an Honours thesis. Other approaches are also possible. You are encouraged to take your supervisor’s advice on the approach most suitable for you.  

 

Thesis Options

Translation can be incorporated into an Honours thesis in a number of ways.

1) Undertaking the Honours Thesis as a Translation Project

This option is recommended only for students with a solid foundation of scholarly knowledge in translation studies. It is usually restricted to students who have completed ATS3083 Translating across cultures before commencing Honours. Students will also be required to enrol in or audit APG5875 Introduction to interpreting and translation studies in their first semester of Honours.

The project consists of a translation of approximately 9,000-10,000 words, with a critical introduction or research commentary of 6,000-8,000 words. In the case of poetry translations the text may be considerably shorter, in which case the commentary should be expanded.

The project may consist of a series of set texts from a particular genre (e.g., scientific, medical, legal, technical, governmental, journalistic), or students may choose to focus on literary and/or cultural translation, selecting one main text (previously untranslated), in consultation with the supervisor. Students will be expected to translate into their A language.

Detailed guidelines for Honours translation projects

2) Undertaking a conventional Honours Thesis focusing on an aspect of translation studies

This option is recommended only for students with a solid foundation of scholarly knowledge in translation studies. It is usually restricted to students who have completed ATS3083 Translating Across Cultures before commencing Honours.

Students choosing this option undertake a conventional Honours Thesis project under the supervision of a member of staff in the Translation & Interpreting Studies Program. The project may examine an aspect of translation theory about which you advance a thesis and defend your argument. It could also provide a critical assessment of an aspect of translation history or of a published translation, or a comparison and critical assessment of two translations.

3) Including a translated text or excerpts within a conventional Honours Thesis

In Honours Thesis projects undertaken in language disciplines, there is often scope for inclusion of a component of original translation. Recent theses that have adopted this approach include a critical analysis of media reporting that incorporated translations of several key news articles published in the source language, and a study on an area of public policy in which the student included original translations of government documents and position papers.