Poems on Affairs of State. Augustan Satirical Verse, 1660–1714, gen. ed. George deF. Lord. Vol 4: 1685–1688, ed. Galbraith M. Crump (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 1968) (z-POAS4)

Loyalty’s a noble thing z-POAS4*1 (pp. 4-7)
For none hath seen tomorrow
<The reward of loyalty. Being a song of the times advising every man to be faithful to God, loyal to his king, and honest to his neighbour, and not to meddle with state affairs. To the tune of Hark, the thundering canons roar [copy-text: Asmole G. 16 (broadside, 1685)]>

Trumpets sound and steeples ring z-POAS4*2 (pp. 8-10)
God bless him then forever
<A trick for Tyburn or A prison rant. Being a song of the prisoners of Newgate at the Jail delivery. To the tune of Hark, the thundering canons roar [copy-text: Harvard broadside, 1685]>

Great sir our poor hearts were ready to burst z-POAS4*3 (pp. 12-13)
That sign not this address
<The humble address of the loyal professors of divinity and law that want preferment and practice. Introduced by their graces of Canterbury and B[?] [copy-text: Phillipps 8302 (get new Yale number)]>

Come listen ye Whigs to my pitiful moan z-POAS4*4 (pp. 15-20)
To think how they’ll truss up the saviour o’ th’ nation
<The Salamanca Doctor’s farewell or Titus’ exaltation to the pillory upon his conviction of perjury. A ballad, to the tune of Packington’s Pound [copy-text: Yale broadside, 1685]>

Whet all your wits and antidote your eyes z-POAS4*5 (pp. 20-3)
The grumbling ghost of old Presbytery
<The tragi-comedy of Titus Oates who sometime went under the notion of the Salamanca Doctor; who being convicted of perjury and several other crimes at the King’s Bench Bar, Westminster, May 16, 1685, had his sentence to stand in the pillory, to be whipped at the cart’s arse, and to be sent back to prison [copy-text: Harvard broadside, 1685]>

Full twenty years and more our lab’ring stage z-POAS4*6 (pp. 25-6)
And get by singing what you lost by roaring
<Prologue to the opera Albion and Albanius (1685) [Dryden] [copy-text: Albion and Albanius (1685)]>

After our Aesop’s fable shown today z-POAS4*7 (pp. 26-7)
As by a word the world itself was made
<Epilogue [to the opera Albion and Albanius (1685) [Dryden] [copy-text: Albion and Albanius (1685)]>

See the visor’s pulled off and the zealots are arming z-POAS4*8 (pp. 32-4)
Whilst our hands hearts and swords are all true to the crown
<The western rebel or The true protestant standard set up. To the tune of Packington’s Pound [copy-text: Harvard broadside, 1685]>

Come beat alarm sound a charge z-POAS4*9 (pp. 35-7)
Against the rogues in Lyme boy
<Monmouth degraded or, James Scott, the little King in Lyme. A song to the tune of Hark, hark, the thundering canons roar [copy-text: Harvard broadside, 1685]>

You who the gazing world did once admire z-POAS4*10 (pp. 37-40)
Till with despair and envy he shall die
<The country’s advice to the late Duke of Monmouth and those in rebellion with him [copy-text: Harvard broadside, 1685]>

Yes fickle Cambridge Perkin’s found this true z-POAS4*11 (pp. 41-3)
Melt down their Sejanus to pots and brass kettles
<On the University of Cambridge’s burning the Duke of Monmouth’s picture, 1685, who was formerly their chancellor. In answer to this question: In turba semper sequitur fortunam et odit damnatos [George Stepney] [copy-text: Poems on Affairs of State (1697, continuation)]>

Since by just flames the guilty piece is lost z-POAS4*12 (pp. 44-9)
And make us whilst we pity him forget our loyalty
<Advice to the painter on the happy defeat of the rebels in the west and the execution of the late Duke of Monmouth. — Pictoribus atque poetis / Quidlibet — [Matthew Prior] [copy-text: Orp19]>

Unhappier age who e’er saw z-POAS4*13 (p. 55)
To Jesuits the state
<Over Lord Dover’s door [copy-text: broadside, 1688]>

In vain did Heav’n its miracles produce z-POAS4*14 (pp. 55-7)
For our protection we his rights maintain
<A poem on England’s happiness [copy-text: Harvard broadside, 1686]>

What think you of this age now z-POAS4*15 (pp. 57-60)
‘Tis a lie we all do know
<Song to the tune of A begging we will go [copy-text: 04pa]>

Once how I doted on this jilting town z-POAS4*16 (pp. 62-7)
But all the mighty pother ends in punk
<The town life [copy-text: Poems on Affairs of State (1697)]>

The widows and maids z-POAS4*17 (pp. 67-72)
To delight both my lord and my lady
<Song to the tune of Taking of snuff is the mode of the court [copy-text: 04pa]>

Great truckling soul whose stubborn honesty z-POAS4*18 (pp. 75-8)
So Jack of all faiths and of none adieu
<To Mr. Dryden upon his declaring himself a Roman Catholic [copy-text: 03-2pa]>

Thou mercenary renegade thou slave z-POAS4*19 (pp. 79-80)
The honest layman’s faith is still the same
<To Mr. Bays [Dorset?] [copy-text: Folger v. b. 94]>

O glory glory who are these appear z-POAS4*20 (pp. 80-90)
Publish the secrets of our hierarchy
<A heroic scene. Enter Oliver’s porter, fiddler, and poet in Bedlam [copy-text: A second collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

When nature’s God for our offenses died z-POAS4*21 (p. 93)
And perish by those laws ye have abolished
<A stanza put on Westminster Hall gate [copy-text: A second collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

Dignified things may I your leaves implore z-POAS4*22 (pp. 93-4)
You’re downright rogues they only knaves and fools
<To the respective judges [copy-text: Harvard broadside, 1688]>

Here lies a creature of indulgent fate z-POAS4*23 (pp. 98-9)
By this preposterous translation
<An epitaph on Lamentable Lory [copy-text: NLSa12 [1684]]>

Here lives a peer raised by indulgent fate z-POAS4*24 (p. 99)
True to his God and faithful to his trust
<An elogy [copy-text: Of15]>

What heav’nly beam thus antedates the spring z-POAS4*25 (pp. 102-4)
But who most souls to heaven shall direct
<A poem occasioned by his majesty’s most gracious resolution declared in his most honorable privy council, March 18 1686/7, for liberty of conscience [copy-text: Yale broadside, 1687]>

How liberty of conscience that’s a change z-POAS4*26 (pp. 104-8)
Jure divino whip and spur again
<Dr. Wild’s ghost on his majesty’s gracious declaration for liberty of conscience, April 4, 1687 [copy-text: BLh19]>

Let mighty Caesar not disdain to view z-POAS4*27 (pp. 112-13)
And crowned with palm I will contemn the bays
<On the Earl of Castlemaine’s embassy to Rome in King James II’s reign, 1687 [Nahum Tate] [copy-text: John Wright, Account (1688)]>

Old Westminster the seat of kings whose law z-POAS4*28 (pp. 114-15)
But I must cease ’cause none can reach thy praise
<The entry of the pope’s nuncio [copy-text: Poems on Affairs of State (1698)]>

The favourers of The Hind and the Panther will be apt to say z-POAS4*29 (pp. 118-145)
O extremely well here drawer
<The Hind and the Panther Transversed to the story of the country mouse and the city mouse [Charles Montagu and Matthew Prior] [prose text] [copy-text: First edition (1687)]>

Predestination how can he deny z-POAS4*30 (pp. 145-6)
Though glory blazes round ’tis darkness yet
<On the author of The Hind and the Panther [copy-text: Folger 473.1]>

To put religion into dogg’rel rhyme z-POAS4*31 (p. 146)
They fly for refuge to her fig-leafed wit
<On the same [ie the author of The Hind and the Panther] [copy-text: Folger 473.1]>

When martial Caesar came to th’ crown z-POAS4*32 (pp. 146-50)
At last they eat up one another
<Dryden’s ghost [copy-text: Folger 473.1]>

I did intend in rhymes heroic z-POAS4*33 (pp. 153-8)
All quickly will return to forty-eight
<The converts [copy-text: Firth b. 21 (broadside)]>

Not all the threats or favours of a crown z-POAS4*34 (pp. 159-63)
Who love fierce drivers and a looser rein
<The man of honour occasioned by the postscript of Penn’s letter [Charles Montagu?] [copy-text: Yale quarto]>

What shall the honest silently permit z-POAS4*35 (pp. 163-8)
Your forfeit politic pates are fixed northeast
<The men of honour made worthy. Si natura negat, facit indignatio versum. Juvenal [copy-text: Of16]>

Near Hampton Court there lies a common z-POAS4*36 (pp. 170-5)
Have patience till another year
<Hounslow Heath. Upon this place are to be seen / Many rare sights: God save the Queen! [copy-text: A third collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

Thus ’twas of old then Israel felt the rod z-POAS4*37 (pp. 178-80)
Let God arise and his enemies perish
<To the haters of popery. By what names or titles soever dignififed or distinguished [copy-text: A collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, songs, catches, &c. against popery. Relating to the times (1689)]>

We father Godden Gregory and all z-POAS4*38 (pp. 180-5)
Or if you do we can absolve you for’t
<Advice to the test-holders [copy-text: A third collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

Cursed be those dull unpointed dogg’rel rhymes z-POAS4*39 (pp. 191-214)
As when old Hyde was catched with rem in re
<A faithful catalogue of our most eminent ninnies (Quos, omnes / Vicini oderunt, noti, pueri atque puellae.) Horace, Serm. I.i.84–84 [Dorset] [copy-text: Yo70 (Philipps 8301)]>

For this additional declaration z-POAS4*40 (pp. 219-20)
By the next synod of the nation
<The dissenters’ thanksgiving for the late declaration [copy-text: A third collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

When lately King James whom our sovereign we call z-POAS4*41 (pp. 220-2)
‘Twill be well if their godliness turns to their gain
<The clerical cabal [copy-text: VAd43]>

Ye mitred fathers of the land z-POAS4*42 (pp. 223-5)
We’ll try a tug with Rome
<The sentiments. To the bishops [copy-text: Yo08 (Obsorn, Box 89 #3)]>

Let cynics bark and the stern Stagirite z-POAS4*43 (pp. 225-9)
Props of the church and pillars of the throne
<The paradox. Upon the confinement of the bishops and their bailing out [copy-text: A third collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

True Englishmen drink a good health to the mitre z-POAS4*44 (pp. 229-30)
As stout as our martyrs and as just as our laws
<A new catch in praise of the reverend bishops [copy-text: A collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, songs, catches, &c. against popery. Relating to the times (1689)]>

Now call to mind Edom remember well z-POAS4*45 (pp. 230-3)
Be Christians once and stain no more that name
<The Church of England’s glory or The Vindication of Episcopacy [copy-text: Yale quarto]>

As down the torrent of an angry flood z-POAS4*46 (pp. 233-4)
For know that you are clay and they are brass
<The story of the pot and the kettle as it was told by Colonel Titus the night before he kissed the king’s hand [Charles Mountagu?] [copy-text: A second collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

To Toms and Nat z-POAS4*47 (pp. 240-1)
Will cover his dominion
<The council. To the tune of Jamaica [copy-text: The Muses farewell to popery and slavery, or, a collection of miscellany poems, satyrs, songs, &c. made by the most eminent wits of the nation… (1689)]>

When James our great monarch so wise and discreet z-POAS4*48 (pp. 242-3)
That the bishops the bishops did throw out the bill
<Upon the king’s voyage to Chatham to make bulwarks against the Dutch, and the queen’s miscarriage thereon [copy-text: Poems on Affairs of State (1697)]>

Our vows are heard betimes and Heaven takes care z-POAS4*49 (pp. 244-55)
Yourself our balance hold the world’s our isle
<Britannia rediviva. A poem on the prince born on the 10th of June 1688 [Dryden] [copy-text: Britannia Rediviva (London, 1688)]>

As I went by St James’ I heard a bird sing z-POAS4*50 (pp. 256-7)
There was no other way for mending the breed
<An excellent new ballad called The Prince of Darkness, showing how three nations may be set on fire by a warming pan [copy-text: A supplement to the collection of miscellany poems against popery & slavery (1689)]>

Old stories of a Tyler sing z-POAS4*51 (pp. 257-9)
To swear and damn with a bonne grâce
<Tom Tiler, or the nurse [copy-text: Bodleian Library, Wood 417 (broadside)]>

The critics that pretend to sense z-POAS4*52 (pp. 259-63)
And posted to the queen away
<The audience [George Stepney?] [copy-text: New York Public Library broadside]>

The mighty monarch of this British isle z-POAS4*53 (pp. 263-72)
Your souls to Rome but send the pope to hell
<A poem on the deponents concerning the birth of the Prince of Wales [copy-text: Bodleian broadside collection, Vet. A3. C. 133]>

The year of wonder now is come z-POAS4*54 (pp. 275-7)
And Louis lead you by the nose
<To the Prince of Orange. A packet of advice, with the packet boat returned [copy-text: A second collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

An invasion from Dutchland is all the discourse z-POAS4*55 (pp. 277-9)
On condition that you may depart with your lives
<All shams. To the tune of Packington’s Pound [copy-text: The Muses farewell to popery and slavery, or, a collection of miscellany poems, satyrs, songs, &c. made by the most eminent wits of the nation… (1689)]>

The talk up and down z-POAS4*56 (pp. 279-84)
And faith I think not sooner
<The statesman’s almanac. Being an excellent new ballad, in which the qualities of each month are considered … To the tune of Cold and raw, the north did blow [copy-text: Harvard broadside]>

Robbed of our rights and by such water rats z-POAS4*57 (pp. 284-8)
With earth his honour glory with the heaven
<In defiance to the Dutch [copy-text: Harvard broadside [1688]]>

Would you be famous and renowned in story z-POAS4*58 (pp. 291-4)
Make subjects love and enemies to quake / This is the time
<The advice [copy-text: Yale broadside]>

Come come great Orange come away z-POAS4*59 (pp. 294-9)
Except it be to have a rope / Couragio couragio couragio
<Ballad. To the tune of Couragio [copy-text: Harvard broadside]>

As Ralph and Nick i’ th’ field were plowing z-POAS4*60 (pp. 299-303)
There’ll be two losses for one winner
<The plowman [copy-text: Yo08 (Obsorn, Box 89 #3)]>

Would you be a man in power z-POAS4*61 (pp. 303-5)
Can their king so neatly bubble
<Song. To the tune of Men in Fashion [copy-text: Yo08 (Obsorn, Box 89 #3)]>

Good people I pray / Throw the orange away z-POAS4*62 (pp. 305-8)
And so will King Pippin too dry to be squeezed / By an orange
<The orange [Matthew Prior] [copy-text: Harvard broadside]>

Ho brother Teague dost hear de decree z-POAS4*63 (pp. 311-12)
By Chreist and St Patrick the nation’s our own
<A new song [to the tune of Lilli Burlero] [Thomas Wharton?] [copy-text: Luttrell broadside]>

There was a prophecy lately found in a bog z-POAS4*64 (pp. 312-13)
For Talbot’s a dog and Tyrconnel’s an ass
<An Irish prophecy [Thomas Wharton?] [copy-text: A second collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

By Chreist my dear Morish vat maukes de sho’ sad z-POAS4*65 (pp. 313-14)
For be Goad dey will hang us out of de way
<The second part of Lilli Burlero bullen a-la [copy-text: A second collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

D’ye hear the news of the Dutch dear Frank z-POAS4*66 (pp. 314-15)
For then i’fegs your orange we’ll squeeze
<A new song upon the Hogen Mogens [copy-text: Harvard broadside]>

Our history reckons some kings of great fame z-POAS4*67 (pp. 315-16)
For matter of getting the pope will dispense
<A new song. To the tune of Lilli burlero [copy-text: The Muses farewell to popery and slavery, or, a collection of miscellany poems, satyrs, songs, &c. made by the most eminent wits of the nation… (1689)]>

The pillars of popery now are blown down z-POAS4*68 (pp. 317-19)
You may guess by the paw at the bulk of the beast
<Song. To the tune of Lilli burlero [copy-text: A second collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, satyrs, songs, &c. against popery and tyranny, relating to the times (1689)]>

A parliament with one consent z-POAS4*69 (pp. 323-6)
Be hanged or else beheaded
<A new song on the calling of a free parliament January 15, 1689 [copy-text: A collection of the newest and most ingenious poems, songs, catches, &c. against popery. Relating to the times (1689)]>

When the joy of all hearts and desire of all eyes z-POAS4*70 (pp. 327-30)
But Orange shall reap the reward of his merit
<The scamperers. To the tune of Packington’s Pound [copy-text: Yale quarto]>

In former days when men had sense z-POAS4*71 (pp. 330-3)
A monarch’s progress in December
<The progress [Henry Mildmay?] [copy-text: Poems on Affairs of State (1698)]>