Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Rawl. poet. 123 (Orp23)

Autograph manuscripts of John Oldham. An assemblage of separately written sheets, bifolds and scraps of various kinds, not a pre-existing book. The original fair copy collection lasts only as far as Oldham’s numbering, i.e. to p. 53a = Oldham’s p. 67. First lines are those as given in the Brooks and Selden edition.

Title-page: `Poems / Written on several Occasions. / Me dulces ante omnia Musæ / Quarum sacra fero ingenti percussus amore / Accipiant. – Virg. Georg. 2. / Vos otia vitæ / Solamur cantu ventosaque gaudia famæ / Quærimus. – Stat Sylv.’ [p. 1]

Now curses on you all ye virtuous fools Orp23*1 (pp. 3-16)
And acted somewhat which might merit more than hell
<Aude aliquid brevibus Gyaris & carcere dignum / Si vis esse aliquis. – Juven. Sat. Pindaric [First title `The Town Hector’ scribbled through] [marg: July 1670. Croydon] [first line has note (on p. 2): `Supposed to be spoken by a court hector at breaking of the dial in Privy-Garden’] [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [B & S p. 57]>

My part is done and you’ll I hope excuse Orp23*2 (pp. 16-19)
To visit for the sins of lewd mankind
<Apology for the foregoing {former uncorr} verses by way of epilogue [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [p. 20 blank] [B & S p. 68]>

Far from our pleasant native Palestine Orp23*3 (pp. 21-6)
And fill thy glutted channels with their scattered brains and gore
<Paraphrase on the 137 Psalm. Pindaric [marg: 10ber [= December] 22 76 at Bedington] [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [also numbered pp. 35-40] [B & S p. 140]>

As when of old some bright and heavenly dame Orp23*4 (pp. 27-31)
Nor think a higher blessing in the gift of fate
<Upon the marriage of the Prince of Orange with the Lady Mary [marg: 9ber 5. 1677. at Bedington] [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [also numbered pp. 41-45] [B & S p. 278]>

Great thou whom ’tis a crime almost to dare to praise Orp23*5 (pp. 32-44)
And still tread round the endless circle of eternity
<Upon the works of Ben. Jonson, reprinted. Pindaric {whom ’tis a] who mak’st it} [marg: Written at Croyden. Anno 1677/8] [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [also numbered pp. 46-58] [ B & S p. 194] [see also pp. 224-5 below]>

To thee O God we thy just praises sing Orp23*6 (pp. 45-53)
And face wide gaping hell and all its slighted powers defy
<Paraphrase upon the hymn of S. Ambrose. Ode [marg: Writ. Febr. 1680 at Rygate] [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [also numbered pp. 59-67] [B & S p. 144] [the next few blank pages are paginated 53b-53f; from this point, even p. numbers are on rectos]>

No she shall ne’er escape if gods there be Orp23*7 (pp. 54-60)
But so be damned of mere necessity
<Some pieces of satyr. On a woman, who by her falsehood and scorn was the death of my friend [marg: Whitsuntide 78. at Croydon] [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [B & S p. 80]>

Dull and unthinking hadst thou none but me Orp23*8 (pp. 61-64b)
That dares pull down the vengeance of my hate
<Upon a bookseller that exposed him by printing a piece of his grossly mangled and faulty [marg: Christmas 1680 Rygate] [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [B & S p. 156]>

Stans sonipes radiante jubâ quà flectis habenas Orp23*9 (pp. 64c-64d)
Ardet et hinnitu turbæ respondet ovanti
<In caput Jobi 39 a commate 19 usque ad 26 paraphrasis poetica [end: A.S.A.B.C.C.] [pp. 64e, 65 blank] [not in B & S] [librarian’s note: pp. 66-69 now MS Eng. misc.a.23, fols. 16–17]>

<pp. 70, 71, 72, 74, 76, 77: draft of `I sing of battles and that sacred wight’>
<The desk. Canto I [see p. 124 (*23)]>

<p. 71: 4 lines of Latin prose in a different hand, `Pecus sub meridiem in estu…’>

<p. 71: title `Upon the Plot’ followed by single line `I had thought Hell had done its best — ‘ (cf. #48)>

<pp. 73, 75: alphabet writing practice>

<[librarian’s note: pp. 78-9 now MS Eng. misc.a.23, fol. 16 (? see above) (where are pp. 77a-c?)]>

But mention not the horrid execrable cause Orp23*10
And make us in new plagues our guilt atone
<[no title; B & S have `[On the death of King Charles I.]’, p. 340]>

<p. 80: extract beginning `This hoary Nestor has 4 ages bin’. Another passage from `The Desk’ (*23)>

<p. 81 [rev]: `… not help much at the table for she was small / The bird admonished the young ones’. Prose homilies or tales (incomplete?) in a large childish hand>

Tell me abandoned miscreant prithee tell Orp23*11 (pp. 82-98)
And so thy book itself turn Sodomite
<Upon the author of the play called Sodom (title on p. 84) [Oldham, autograph. Text reconstructed from numerous drafts (first line p. 83] [B & S p. 341]>

As to that poet if so great a one as he Orp23*12 (pp. 85, 87-9, 93-6, 103)
<In answer to Mr Spencer (title p. 87, with first line `As banished Ovid if so great a name as he’); The poet addressing himself to satyr (title p. 94, with first line `’Tis now four years if I well count the time’) [drafts only for `A letter from the country’] [B & S p. 149, see also p. 429, 542-5] [first line here is from the printed edition 1681, not in the MS draft; the last line in 1681 is also missing here]>

<pp. 85, 87-100: drafts for `In praise of poetry’>
<[ll. 20–32 beginning `Poet th’expensive wonder Heav’n but seldom makes’] [see p. 100]>

<p. 88: draft for `A letter from the country’ ll. 60-64>
<followed by `Happy the man whom she thinks fit to save / From fate oblivion and the grave’ [not placed]>

[Hail God of verse pardon that thus I take in vain] Orp23*13 (p. 88, 258-9)
<[Oldham, autograph drafts of stanza 4 only of `The praise of Homer’ [B & S p. 124]>

<p. 89: draft for `A letter from the country’>

<pp. 90, 91, 92, 93: drafts for `Tell me abandoned miscreant …’>

<pp. 93, 94, 95: drafts for `A letter from the country’>

Peace then ye dull blasphemers who profane Orp23*14 (pp. 96, 99-100, 85, 87, 88, 98)
From fate oblivion and the grave
<In praise of poetry [B & S p. 333 (assembled text) and 525] [first line is 2/3rds down p. 96; `last’ line is a B & S editorial decision, and is found on p. 88]>

<A boy set crying at a well (p. 97 [rev])>
<[no title] [a moral tale, incomplete, in a large childish hand] [marg: Elias Rich]>

<p. 98 draft of `Tell me abandoned …’>
<On the author of the play called Sodom>

<p. 99: No thou shalt ne’er escape if Gods there be>
<To L. G. [10-line draft for `A satyr upon a woman’ (*7)]>

<Amo te sic bene ut pars tui videt (p. 101 [rev])>
<[prose extract in large childish hand] [end: Elias Rich]>

Doctrina est melior auro pretiosior Orp23*15 (p. 102)>
pro omni delicto quod committit invitè
<[prose extract in a large round hand (complete?)]>

<p. 103: drafts for `A letter from the country’>

Entheus igne sacro vates ardescit et instar Orp23*16 (p. 104)
Non ultraque suum spreveris alte mato
<Mihi turpe relinqui est [new hand]>

Great prince and so much greater as more wise Orp23*17 (p. 105)
To woods and groves what once the painter sings
<To the king>

Imperial prince king of the seas and isles Orp23*18 (p. 105)
Kings are but cards in war they’re gods in peace
<[no title]>

[Sandwich in Spain now and the duke in love] Orp23*19 (p. 105)
Truth is thou’st drawn her in effigy
<[incomplete, begins at `Thrice in one year sure ’tis this man is wood’] [p. 106 blank]>

Colendissime vir / Ecce recens Author primitias tibi meas do Orp23*20 (p. 107)
quem eiusdem felicitatis compotem et sagacem novi
<[no title] [prose letter]>

<pp. 108-9 continuation of #22 below, beginning `From pedagogue and mother just set free’>

Were I who to my cost already am Orp23*21 (pp. 110-15)
<Satyr upon man [incomplete, ends l. 165 `The knaves will all agree to call you knave’ owing to lost leaf]>

Chloe in verse by your command I write Orp23*22 (pp. 116-23, 108-9)
But you are tired and so am I farewell
<A letter from Artemiza in the town to Chloe in the country>

I sing of battles and that sacred wight Orp23*23 (pp. 124-35)
Till supper lulls himself and cares to rest
<The desk. An heroic poem. First canto [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [Other drafts pp. 66, 68, 69, 70-2, 74, 76-7, 77a, 77b, 77c, 79, 80 (This hoary Nestor)] [p. 136 is headed `Second Canto’ but is blank. Following pages to 162 also blank] [B & S p. 324]>

Parvulum habeo fratrem quem brevi ibit ad scholam Orp23*24 (p. 162)
Datum a domo patris quinta nonarum martii anno domini 1678
<[no title] [prose text, is first preserved line real first line?] [p. 163 blank]>

Long had the famed impostor found success Orp23*25 (pp. 164-73)
[no last line]
<Loyola’s will. Satyr 3d. [Another heading above: `A Jubilee in 25 year’] [Oldham, autograph draft of Satyr upon the Jesuits, iii] [B & S p. 26] [other drafts pp. 184, 253, 254] [last line in B & S `And scrambling spirits seize his parting soul’ not found in MS]>

Dear soul / Now that I think on’t I promised to write to thee Orp23*26 (p. 166, sideways)
and so kiss thy hands and be thy humble servant
<[no title] [draft letter, headed `Rygate June 3. 1679′]>

For who can longer hold when every press Orp23*27 (pp. 174, 177-9, 181-3)
<Satyr upon the J[esuits. Prologue] [Oldham, 2 autograph drafts] [B & S p. 5] [the last line in B & S `Than damning Popes anathemas and curse’ not found in MS]>

Dear Jack / After a toilsome journey I came timely enough to dine Orp23*28 (p. 175 [rev])
and count me the faithfullest of thy friends ye thy humble servant Jo: Baker
<[prose letter with postscript] [end: Octob: 17th 1671]>

<pp. 177-9, 181-3: drafts for Satyrs upon the Jesuits, Prologue>

<p. 180 (sideways): top half has an address `These For Mr John Oldham at his chamber in Edmund hall Oxon’. Lower half has `Jack Oldham / Jack in mock’, a heading `Transitions Juven. 6. S.’ and a page of Latin phrases>

<p. 183: 5 lines at top of page: `Shall I alone sit tamely by?’ belong with ??. In the middle (endorsed) an address `For his sonne John Oldham in Edmund Hall. Oxon. these’. Six lines below belong with Jesuits prologue>

<pp. 184-5: drafts of Jesuits, iii>

<p. 186: draft of Prologue>

<p. 187: 2 lines from Prologue, 2 lines from Satyr, ii>

Honoured Sir / I am at length removed to my new place of residence Orp23*29 (p. 187, sideways)
I shall be better able to tell you my mind
<[prose letter (complete? no signature)] [headed `From Rygate March 2 79′]>

Nay if our sins are grown so high of late Orp23*30 (pp. 190-2, 189, 188, 194-5, 197)
<Satyr upon the Jesuits [ii] [Oldham, autograph draft. Other drafts between pp. 174 and 293] [B & S p. 18] [probably p. 193 as well mixed in with drafts of ii] [last line in B & S `It self out done its devils damned for less’ not found in MS]>

<p. 195: lines from both from Satyrs ii and iii in draft>

<p. 196: lines and jottings headed `Heads yet untouch’d’ for Satyrs iii and iv. See B & S p. 551>

Dear Sir I promised poetry ’tis true Orp23*31 (pp. 198-204)
Not spare the namesake of your faithful Spencer
<[no title] [by John Spencer. New hand] [This is Spencer’s verse-epistle to Oldham to which `A letter from the country’ is a reply] [`B & S p. 534, with date March. 18th. 1677/8] [p. 205 blank]>

Yes you are mighty wise I warrant mighty wise Orp23*32 (pp. 206-11, 213)
We’ll briskly wake and rise and call for drink again
<A dithyrambique on drinking supposed to be spoken by Rochester at the Guinny Club [marg: Aug. 5. 1677] [Oldham, FAIR COPY autograph] [first stanza 7 on p. 211 is incomplete and differs from that on following page] [differs from B & S and has marg: Ebrietas est voluntaria insania. Senec.] [B & S p. 260, 547] [p. 212 blank] [last 2 lines in MS not in printed sources]>

<p. 214 begins: `Thy genius calls thee not to purchase fame’>
<[end of Mac Flecknoe, see #40 below] [p. 215 blank]>

[Greek couplet by Minnermus] Orp23*33 (p. 216)

Vita quid est quid dulce nisi juvet aurea Cypris Orp23*33.1 (p. 216)
Tum peream veneris cum mitis cura perit
<[Latin version, by Grotius]>

What joy without dear C. has life in store Orp23*33.2 (p. 216)
Let me not live when I can swive no more
<[parody by ?Oldham] [not in B & S]>

[I mourn Adonis fair Adonis dead] Orp23*34 (p. 217)
Then thou must sigh then thou must weep again
<[Oldham, autograph FAIR COPY of last part of `Lamentation for Adonis’, beginning at l. 170] [`June.2.81′] [B & S p. 139]>

So Lyce now my prayers are heard at last Orp23*35 (pp. 218-19)
Fresher than infant roses in their bloom
<Horace. B. 4. Ode. 13 imitated. To Lyce the punk [Oldham, autograph fragment] [B & S p. 339]>

<p. 220 begins `Another strait did in the talk succeed’ [autograph draft, not placed. Possibly intended for A satyr upon the town and times]>

<p. 221: Legendis libris doctus evades>
<[prose text in a large childish hand]>

Heaven knows for what great crying sin of mine Orp23*36 (p. 222)
But a pursuivant or a messenger
<A satyr upon the town and times [Oldham, autograph fragment] [B & S p. 338]>

I had no action to be tried in town Orp23*37 (p. 223)
With the chief martyrs in Queen Mary’s days
<Satyr on the times [Oldham, autograph] [B & S p. 338]>

<pp. 224-5: draft for `Upon the works of Ben Johnson’ (*5 above)>
<Upon the works of Ben. Johnson. Reprinted [B & S p. 546 prints these draft lines which were not retained]>

<p. 226 again has `Another strait did in the talk succeed’ (see p. 220)>

Though much concerned to leave my dear old friend Orp23*38 (pp. 226-7)
<A satyr in imitation of the third of Juvenal. Argument. A friend of the poet’s is brought in giving him an account why he removes from London, where by reason of the favour given by great people to the French, their arts, customs, and fashions, likewise the plottings, factions, perjuries, knaveries, and villanies of our own nation, together with the contempt of the poor, the continual fires, noises, crowdings, night-robberies and other outrages, no man of sense and honesty will endure to reside. [marg: Written in May. 82] [Oldham, autograph] [incomplete, to l. 35 only owing to lost leaves] [B & S p. 246; p. 547 prints the `Argument’ on p. 226 later discarded]>

By Heav’n and all its gods I swear Orp23*39 (pp. 228, 230)
They all depend on that alone
<A rant to his mistress [marg: May the 15th 76] [Oldham, autograph] [B & S p. 323] [p. 229 blank apart from heading `137 Psalm Paraphras’d’ (rev); p. 231 blank]>

All human things are subject to decay Orp23*40 (pp. 232-5, 214)
With doubled portion of his father’s art
<Mac Fleckno. A satyr [marg: 1678] [In Oldham’s hand] [p. 233 ends with l. 48; p. 234 begins with l. 151; p. 235 ends with l. 202; p. 214 has l. 203-end]>

Go die thou old decrepit year Orp23*41 (pp. 236-7)
A day a year an age to come
<The epicure. Wrote the last day of the year 1675 [In Oldham’s hand, but not in B & S or Lion] [end: Philomusus]>

Madam when late your tenderness resigned Orp23*42 (p. 238)
The bowers of death then to relinquish you
<To Mrs Kingscot on the death of her daughter [verse letter] [Oldham, autograph, but not in B & S] [p. 239 blank]>

Begin the song your instruments advance Orp23*43 (p. 240)
[no last line]
<[no title] [Oldham, autograph, stanza 1 and chorus only] [B & S p. 282] [p. 241 blank]>

The clods as if informed with some new soul Orp23*44 (p. 242)
Doubly by wonder and by fear amazed
<[no title] [Oldham, fair copy autograph of Ovid, Metam. Book III, ll. 106-15 imitated] [B & S p. 340] [p. 243 blank]>

By Hell ’twas bravely done what less than this Orp23*45 (pp. 244-5, 260-2))
[no last line]
<Garnet’s ghost addressing to the conspirators met in private cabal just after the murder of Godfrey [marg: First] [Oldham, autograph draft of Satyr upon the Jesuits, i (though last lines p. 245 now with ii] [ B & S p. 7] [passage containing B & S’s last line not found in MS]>

<pp. 246-50 begins: `From Hell’s dread monarch sent I envoy come’>
<Garnet’s ghost addressing to the conspirators met in private cabal [Oldham, another draft of previous]>

Homo improbas illa creatura quam Deus putavit Orp23*46 (pp. 251-2, sideways)
Igitur apparet q[uo]d mors omnibus commune est
<Mors omnibus commune est [prose text]>

<p. 252 has six lines beginning: `Great was that tyrant’s wish which should be mine’ (Satyr i)>

<p. 253: contains draft lines which made their way in to Satyrs i and iii>

<p. 254 begins: Next for religion learn what’s fit to take>
<Loyola’s will. 3rd satyr [draft opening for #25]>

Cursed and forever cursed be the day wherein Orp23*47 (p. 255, sideways)
Then cutting off all th’ royal progeny
<On the powder plot [not in B & S]>

I thought that those damned rogues had done their worst Orp23*48 (p. 255, sideways)
And think them not worthy of a halter
<On the late plot [not in B & S]>

The author of these trifles had not consented to their publishing Orp23*49 (p. 256)
Brokers of benefices give the scripture passport and safe conduct
<Advertisement [prose text] [Oldham, transcribed in B & S, pp. xc-xci] [end: Postell’s Glosses]>

Once I was common wood a shapeless log Orp23*50 (p. 257)
<St Ignatius’s image brought in discovering the ridiculous superstition of the [Church of Rome] [First line in this short draft of a long poem, `Once I meer timber was, a shapeless log’] [Oldham, autograph draft] [B & S p. 45]>

<pp. 258-9: draft for stanza 4 of `The praise of Homer’ (*13)>

<pp. 260-2: various draft passages for Satyr i>

Those popish dogs those informal bitches Orp23*51 (p. 263, sideways)
If you don’t like them pray do you them mend
<On gunpowder treason plot [end: C V Fa:]>

<pp. 264-5: drafts for Satyr i>

<p. 266: rougher draft of `The Vision’ (*53 below)>
<A satyr [see B & S p. 337 for some lines from this draft]>

<p. 267 (rev): Latin jottings>

<p. 268: rougher draft of `The Vision’ (*53 below)>
<Satyr>

Decet anumquemque esse memorem suæ postremæ finis Orp23*52 (p. 269)
Igitur oportet quod mors commune omnibus
<Mors omnibus commune [Latin prose] [cf. #46]>

‘Twas late and now all noise as well as light Orp23*53 (pp. 270-3)
And shapes of Jesuits stand absolving by
<The vision. A satyr [marg: 9r 78] [Oldham, fair copy autograph of first 2 sections, "the longest and most consecutive, and almost certainly the latest, of the extant drafts"] [B & S p. 335] [see also pp. 66, 268, 270] [pp. 274, 275, 276 (torn) blank]>

[no first line]
Igitur oportet quod pecuniæ obediunt omnia Orp23*54 (p. 277, sideways)
<[no title] [prose passge, first half of page missing]>

Search through the world from London to Japan Orp23*55 (p. 278)
Who can discern ‘twixt good that’s truly so
<Juvenal’s 10 satyr imitated [4-line fragment] [Oldham, autograph draft] [B & S p. 340]>

Mi amicissime / Mirare forsan cur Latine ad te scribo Orp23*56 (pp. 279-80)
non aliena poscit in scribendi sagetam nec etc
<10th 78 [prose letter] [end: Tui fidissimum] [not Oldham’s hand]>

<pp. 281-3: drafts for from Satyr, i>

<p. 282: Latin passages entered upside down, including a reference to Sardanapalus>

I oft have thought what is this thing called wit Orp23*57 (p. 284)
[no last line]
<Satyr on wit [a single-line fragment [B & S p. 335]>

<p. 284: draft lines for Satyrs ii and i>

<p. 285: draft lines for Satyr ii>

<p. 286: draft lines for Satyr i, with upside-down jottings on lower half of page>

<pp. 287-8: drafts for Satyr ii and i>

Come painter once again assume thy skill Orp23*58 (p. 289)
Damned Gulph of lust
<Advice to a painter [Oldham, autograph draft] [B & S p. 337]>

<p. 289: the space between the 2nd and 3rd fragments of #58 was subsequently filled with drafts for Satyr ii>

<p. 290: alphabet practice>

<p. 291: drafts for Satyr iii, c. l. 405- >

<p. 292: drafts for Satyr ii>

<p. 293: drafts for Satyr i>

Take the two carps and let them blood in the tail Orp23*59 (p. 294)
<A receit dress a carp (?) [fairly illiterate recipe on back of letter (next entry)]>

Loving friend / I am neither dead nor fled not yet have forgot Orp23*60 (p. 295, upside down)
But I would desire then to defer that journey till you see your loving friend Rich[ard] Hawden
<[prose letter, dated `March the 25th 1671]>


Summary List of Works in Orp23

Now curses on you all ye virtuous fools Orp23*1
My part is done and you’ll I hope excuse Orp23*2
Far from our pleasant native Palestine Orp23*3
As when of old some bright and heavenly dame Orp23*4
Great thou whom ’tis a crime almost to dare to praise Orp23*5
To thee O God we thy just praises sing Orp23*6
No she shall ne’er escape if gods there be Orp23*7
Dull and unthinking hadst thou none but me Orp23*8
Stans sonipes radiante jubâ quà flectis habenas Orp23*9
But mention not the horrid execrable cause Orp23*10
Tell me abandoned miscreant prithee tell Orp23*11
As to that poet if so great a one as he Orp23*12
[Hail God of verse pardon that thus I take in vain] Orp23*13
Peace then ye dull blasphemers who profane Orp23*14
Doctrina est melior auro pretiosor Orp23*15 [prose]
Entheus igne sacro vates ardescit et instar Orp23*16
Great prince and so much greater as more wise Orp23*17
Imperial prince king of the seas and isles Orp23*18
[Sandwich in Spain now and the duke in love] Orp23*19
Colendissime vir / Ecce recens Author primitias tibi meas do Orp23*20 [prose]
Were I who to my cost already am Orp23*21
Chloe in verse by your command I write Orp23*22
I sing of battles and that sacred wight Orp23*23
Parvulum habeo fratrem quem brevi ibit ad scholam Orp23*24 [prose]
Long had the famed impostor found success Orp23*25
Dear Soul / Now that I think on’t I promised to write to thee Orp23*26 [prose]
For who can longer hold when every press Orp23*27
Dear Jack / After a toilsome journey I cam timely enough to dine Orp23*28 [prose]
Honoured sir / I am at length removed to my new place of residence Orp23*29 [prose]
Nay if our sins are grown so high of late Orp23*30
Dear Sir I promised poetry ’tis true Orp23*31
Yes you are mighty wise I warrant mighty wise Orp23*32
[Greek couplet by Minnermus] Orp23*33
Vita quid est quid dulce nisi juvet aurea Cypris Orp23*33.1
What joy without dear C. has life in store Orp23*33.2
[I mourn Adonis fair Adonis dead] Orp23*34
So Lyce now my prayers are heard at last Orp23*35
Heaven knows for what great crying sin of mine Orp23*36
I had no action to be tried in town Orp23*37
Though much concerned to leave my dear old friend Orp23*38
By Heav’n and all its gods I swear Orp23*39
All human things are subject to decay Orp23*40
Go die thou old decrepit year Orp23*41
Madam when late your tenderness resigned Orp23*42
Begin the song your instruments advance Orp23*43
The clods as if informed with some new soul Orp23*44
By Hell ’twas bravely done what less than this Orp23*45
Homo improbas illa creatura quam Deus putavit Orp23*46 [prose]
Cursed and forever cursed be the day wherein Orp23*47
I thought that those damned rogues had done their worst Orp23*48
The author of these trifles had not consented to their publishing Orp23*49 [prose]
Once I was common wood a shapeless log Orp23*50
Those popish dogs those informal bitches Orp23*51
Decet anumquemque esse memorem suæ postremæ finis Orp23*52 [prose]
‘Twas late and now all noise as well as light Orp23*53
EX: Igitur oportet quod pecuniæ obediunt omnia Orp23*54 [prose]
Search through the world from London to Japan Orp23*55
Mi amicissime / Mirare forsan cur Latine ad te scribo Orp23*56
I oft have thought what is this thing called wit Orp23*57
Come painter once again assume thy skill Orp23*58
Take the two carps and let them blood in the tail Orp23*59 [prose]
Loving friend / I am neither dead nor fled not yet have forgot Orp23*60 [prose]

In alphabetical order of first line:

‘Twas late and now all noise as well as light Orp23*53
All human things are subject to decay Orp23*40
As when of old some bright and heavenly dame Orp23*4
As to that poet if so great a one as he Orp23*12
Begin the song your instruments advance Orp23*43
But mention not the horrid execrable cause Orp23*10
By Hell ’twas bravely done what less than this Orp23*45
By Heav’n and all its gods I swear Orp23*39
Chloe in verse by your command I write Orp23*22
Colendissime vir / Ecce recens Author primitias tibi meas do Orp23*20 [prose]
Come painter once again assume thy skill Orp23*58
Cursed and forever cursed be the day wherein Orp23*47
Dear Soul / Now that I think on’t I promised to write to thee Orp23*26 [prose]
Dear Sir I promised poetry ’tis true Orp23*31
Dear Jack / After a toilsome journey I cam timely enough to dine Orp23*28 [prose]
Decet anumquemque esse memorem suæ postremæ finis Orp23*52 [prose]
Doctrina est melior auro pretiosor Orp23*15 [prose]
Dull and unthinking hadst thou none but me Orp23*8
Entheus igne sacro vates ardescit et instar Orp23*16
EX: Igitur oportet quod pecuniæ obediunt omnia Orp23*54 [prose]
Far from our pleasant native Palestine Orp23*3
For who can longer hold when every press Orp23*27
Go die thou old decrepit year Orp23*41
Great thou whom ’tis a crime almost to dare to praise Orp23*5
Great prince and so much greater as more wise Orp23*17
Hail God of verse pardon that thus I take in vain Orp23*13
Heaven knows for what great crying sin of mine Orp23*36
Homo improbas illa creatura quam Deus putavit Orp23*46 [prose]
Honoured sir / I am at length removed to my new place of residence Orp23*29 [prose]
I had no action to be tried in town Orp23*37
I mourn Adonis fair Adonis dead Orp23*34
I thought that those damned rogues had done their worst Orp23*48
I oft have thought what is this thing called wit Orp23*57
I sing of battles and that sacred wight Orp23*23
Imperial prince king of the seas and isles Orp23*18
Long had the famed impostor found success Orp23*25
Loving friend / I am neither dead nor fled not yet have forgot Orp23*60 [prose]
Madam when late your tenderness resigned Orp23*42
Mi amicissime / Mirare forsan cur Latine ad te scribo Orp23*56
My part is done and you’ll I hope excuse Orp23*2
Nay if our sins are grown so high of late Orp23*30
No she shall ne’er escape if gods there be Orp23*7
Now curses on you all ye virtuous fools Orp23*1
Once I was common wood a shapeless log Orp23*50
Parvulum habeo fratrem quem brevi ibit ad scholam Orp23*24 [prose]
Peace then ye dull blasphemers who profane Orp23*14
Sandwich in Spain now and the duke in love Orp23*19
Search through the world from London to Japan Orp23*55
So Lyce now my prayers are heard at last Orp23*35
Stans sonipes radiante jubâ quà flectis habenas Orp23*9
Take the two carps and let them blood in the tail Orp23*59 [prose]
Tell me abandoned miscreant prithee tell Orp23*11
The clods as if informed with some new soul Orp23*44
The author of these trifles had not consented to their publishing Orp23*49 [prose]
Those popish dogs those informal bitches Orp23*51
Though much concerned to leave my dear old friend Orp23*38
To thee O God we thy just praises sing Orp23*6
Vita quid est quid dulce nisi juvet aurea Cypris Orp23*33.1
Were I who to my cost already am Orp23*21
What joy without dear C. has life in store Orp23*33.2
Yes you are mighty wise I warrant mighty wise Orp23*32
[Greek couplet by Minnermus] Orp23*33