Forthcoming Events

2018 Events

Monash University Korean Studies

Free events. All welcome! No registration necessary.
Organized by Monash University Korean Studies.

For further information, please contact Andy Jackson: andy.jackson@monash.edu



The Melbourne Metropolitan Korean Studies Seminar Series

Seminar 4

‘Creating an Anti-Communist Motion Picture Producers’ Network in Korea: The Asia Foundation and the Korean Motion Picture Cultural Association (KMPCA)’

Sangjoon Lee
Nanyang Technological University
Singapore

Date: Wednesday 9 May 2018 2-2:30pm
Location: Deakin University, Burwood Corporate Centre

Abstract:

Under the leadership of its first president Robert Blum (1953-1962), The Asia Foundation, a private non-profit organization which was established in 1951, was actively involved in the motion picture industries in Asia since its first feature film project The People Win Through, based on a play written by a Burmese Prime Minister U Nu, came out in 1953. Roughly from 1953 to 1959, to win the battle for hearts and minds in Asia, The Asia Foundation had clandestinely supported anti-Communist motion picture industry personnel, ranging from producers, directors, and technicians to critics, writers, and general intellectuals in Japan, Hong Kong, Burma, Korea, as well as American and British producers in Malaya and Thailand in mostly indirect ways. Nagata Masaichi-initiated Federation of Motion Picture Producers in Southeast Asia (FPA) and its annual Southeast Asian Film Festival had been the Foundation’s core venture and other motion picture operations in Asia, Chang Kuo-sin’s Asia Pictures in Hong Kong and Korean Motion Picture Cultural Association (KMPCA) in Korea, were more or less related outcomes of FPA. What The Asia Foundation’s motion picture project team had hoped for was the construction of the league of anti-Communist motion picture producers in Asia in order to win the psychological war against Communism. Although It was, in the end, a failed project, but it should be noted that The Asia Foundation had played a significant role in the formation of the inter-Asian motion picture industry network in Cold War Asia, which had ultimately redrawn the imaginary and geo-political map of Asia. Drawing archival materials from Asia Foundation Records and Robert Blum Papers, this presentation is primarily concerned with the origins of the Foundation’s motion picture project in Japan and Korea, with a view to explore the ways in which the U.S. government-led cold war cultural policies had influenced the regional film industry.

Biography

Sangjoon Lee is Assistant Professor of Asian Cinema at the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Lee is the editor of Hallyu 2.0: The Korean Wave in the Age of Social Media (University of Michigan Press, 2015) and is currently editing Rediscovering Korean Cinema for University of Michigan Press (forthcoming 2020). His writing has appeared in such journals as Film History, Historical Journal of Film, Radio, and Television, Journal of Korean Studies, Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema, and Transnational Cinemas. He is currently working on a monograph tentatively titled The Asian Cinema Network: The Asian Film Festival and the Cultural Cold War in Asia.


The Melbourne Metropolitan Korean Studies Seminar Series

Seminar 5

‘The South Korean Film Industry’

Sangjoon Lee
Nanyang Technological University
Singapore

Date: Thursday 10 May 2018, 4pm-6pm,
Location: Library-Matheson T4 CL 44Exh (43), Clayton Campus, Monash University

Abstract:

South Korean cinema has been one of the most striking case studies of non-western cinema success stories in the age of the neo-liberal world order where Hollywood dominates the world’s mind, heart, and soul. Under the tsunami of America-led Hollywoodization of the world’s media marketplace, South Korean cinema has successfully defended and keeps maintaining its industry remarkably healthy. In 2001 South Korea became the first film industry in recent history to reclaim its domestic market back from Hollywood. New York-based film magazine Film Comment proclaims that South Korean cinema is “one of the greatest renaissances in global filmmaking the world has ever seen” (2004). And in 2014 local films had a 62% market share in South Korea, the highest such figures in the world, except America and India. In less than two decades, South Korea’s film industry has blossomed from a small-scale curiosity into a vibrant business mimicking the earlier transformation of Hong Kong’s film industry in the process. Moreover, adding to this film industry success story, the high-quality South Korean local product flowed outward to global film markets to connect with international audiences in commercial cinemas, art theatres, at major international film festivals, and new platforms like Netflix and iTunes. Such acclaimed directors like Chan-wook Park, Bong Joon-ho, Hong Sang-soo, Lee Chang-dong, and Kim Jiwoon have now become household names in world cinema today. The goal of this introductory lecture on the Korean film industry is to develop a broad understanding of Korean cinema exploring their wide-ranging impact and asking how they participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, ideology, modernity, politics, and tradition in both regional and international contexts.

Biography

Sangjoon Lee is Assistant Professor of Asian Cinema at the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Lee is the editor of Hallyu 2.0: The Korean Wave in the Age of Social Media (University of Michigan Press, 2015) and is currently editing Rediscovering Korean Cinema for University of Michigan Press (forthcoming 2020). His writing has appeared in such journals as Film History, Historical Journal of Film, Radio, and Television, Journal of Korean Studies, Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema, and Transnational Cinemas. He is currently working on a monograph tentatively titled The Asian Cinema Network: The Asian Film Festival and the Cultural Cold War in Asia.


Korean Studies Conference

‘Reimagining Korean Identity through Wars, Money, Ideas and Exchanges: 70 years’ Identity Transformation’

Monash University Korean Studies, Melbourne, Australia.

Date: August 17-18, 2018.
Location:
August 17, Matheson Library: ISB Meeting Room L1.04/ L1.02, Clayton Campus 9:00am – 6:30pm
August 18, Japanese Studies Centre meeting room & Auditorium 8:30am – 6:30pm

Details: TBA


Korean Studies Speech contest

Date: 20 September 2018, 5-9pm
Location: H1.16 Caulfield

Details: TBA


The Melbourne Metropolitan Korean Studies Seminar Series Biannual Meeting

Monash University Korean Studies, Melbourne, Australia.

Date: Friday 12 October 2018 9am – 5pm (AEDT)
Location: S Building, S901/ S9.02 Caulfield Campus, Melbourne.

Details: TBA


Free events. All welcome! No registration necessary.

Organized by Monash University Korean Studies

For further information, please contact Andy Jackson: andy.jackson@monash.edu