Japanese Studies Centre Postgraduate Symposium Success

Exploring Japan through New Lenses: Emerging Themes in Japanese Studies.

With a Keynote by Professor Tessa Morris-Suzuki
Saturday 26th September, 2015

Japanese Studies Centre, 12 Ancora Imparo Way, Monash University, Clayton

On 26th September, the Japanese Studies Centre hosted the postgraduate symposium “Exploring Japan through New Lenses: Emerging Themes in Japanese Studies.” The event was made possible by a generous grant from the Mitsubishi Corporation, for which the organising committee is incredibly grateful.

31 postgraduate students from a number of Victorian, interstate and international institutions joined together to showcase their recent research on Japan in a fun and welcoming environment. A number of academic staff from Monash and other local universities also attended. The presenters came from a number of disciplinary backgrounds, providing opportunities for discussion across disciplinary borders .

Indeed, crossing borders was an important theme of the symposium, as highlighted by Professor Tessa Morris-Suzuki of the Australian National University in her keynote address “The Frontiers of Japanese Studies: Crossing Geographical and Conceptual Borders.” Presenters crossed national borders, focussing their discussions not only Japan but on a variety of other national contexts including Korea, China, Germany, Thailand and Australia. The borders between the genders were crossed in discussions of sexuality in Japanese popular culture and in the role of women in Japanese traditional arts. The borders between the classroom and students’ private spheres were broached in innovative presentations on language teaching and learning. National borders were probed in papers on border disputes and international child abduction.

A number of new lenses were drawn upon by presenters to understand the changing social, linguistic, political, historical and legal structures which condition Japanese society. From examining the role of the internet in second language learning to investigating how animals are represented in Japan’s legal and political discourses, the postgraduate presenters challenged previous thinking on Japan and sought to develop innovative approaches to the study of this fascinating culture.

Of course, the symposium wasn’t just about presentations and developing new theories! The event provided a space for everyone to network and develop new friendships. Thanks to the fortuitous weather, presenters enjoyed lunch out on the deck of the JSC and were able to relax in the Centre’s Japanese Garden. After the conclusion of the event, presenters and invited guests relaxed over dinner at Samsara Restaurant where a good time was had by all!

The symposium was a phenomenal success, and the organising committee particularly wishes to express their gratitude to the Director of the JSC Carolyn Stevens, and Deputy Director Robyn Spence-Brown, for all their support.

 

Thomas Baudinette, Rikki Campbell & Wes Robertson
Organising Committee
September, 2015

 

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Postwar History Panel
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Martial and Creative Arts Panel
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Popular Culture Panel
03_panel6
Linguistics Panel
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Professor Morris-Suzuki’s keynote address
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Many took their lunch on the deck to enjoy the sunshine
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Legal Studies Panel
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Panels were held in the auditorium, e-room and the manga library
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The Japanese garden on the day
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Two happy convenors at the end of the proceedings!

SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM

Time

THEATRE

E-ROOM

MANGA LIBRARY

8:45am-9:00am

Registration (in Foyer)

9:00am-9:15am

Welcome to Centre
Prof Carolyn STEVENS

 

9:15am-10:45am

Concurrent Panels

Loanwords in hiragana
Hannah KUNERT

 

My dog is very hiragana: Orthography as an index in written Japanese
Wes ROBERTSON

 

How are authors of Japanese manga revolutionising the use of loan words in Japanese society?

Jodie LANGFORD

 

Stories of men, by women, for women: Ideal masculinity and the sexualisation of Three Kingdoms as Boys’ Love adaptations in China and Japan

Asako Patricia SAITO

 

Internationalising Boys Love: Recent “Boys Love” dramas in Thailand
Thomas BAUDINETTE

 

Empowered girls in many guises: Examining production and consumption of the mahō shōjo genre
Simon GOUGH

 

 

10:45am-11:00am

Morning tea (in Foyer)

11:00am-12:00pm

Keynote
Prof Tessa MORRIS-SUZUKI

 

12:00pm-12:45pm

Lunch (in Foyer)

12:45pm-2:00pm

Concurrent Panels

A Preliminary Analysis of the Baojia System as Institutional Control in Manchukuo under Japanese Rule
Mo TIAN

 

Britain Declares Economic War on German Merchants in Japan, 1914
Prue HOLSTEIN

 

The Legacy of Script Reform in Modern Japan

Basil CAHUSAC DE CAUX

 

Sociocultural Approach and Second Language Acquisition: Ontological and epistemological comparison and a proposal to integration
Sally CHAN

 

Why Sociocultural Approaches Matter to Japanese Language Education in Classroom Settings?: Exploring Future Directions of Researches and Educational Practices
Takuya KOJIMA

 

Language resources and gendered positioning articulated by L2 speakers of Japanese in the Australian tertiary setting

Maki YOSHIDA

The legal discourse of territorial disputes in Asia
Jonathan GILCHRIST

 

Analysis of Animal Welfare Legislation in Japan
Fiona MCCANDLESS

 

Japan and the Internationalisation of the Family: A Case Study
Geraldine CARNEY

 

2:00pm-3:30pm

Concurrent Panels

Understanding the fundamentals of keigo as defined by MEXT
Danny HESZ

 

Business and sustainable energy practices in post-Fukushima Japan: social change and motivations
Laura TROBBIANI

 

Right-Wing Nationalist Groups in Japan: The Insider-Outsider Dichotomy
Yasmin BOTTOS

 

Murakami Haruki & Murakami Takashi: Why they are consumed differently in Japan and why this difference matters
Amelia LAUGHLAN

Native-nonnative Japanese dyadic interaction: Aligning and affiliating listeners
Hyesun KO

 

‘Why no Nobel?’ The effects of South Korean anti-Japanese nationalism on Korean-English translation practice

Adam ZULAWNIK

 

Multiple Voices, Multiple Selves

Breanna OSBORN

 

Forgiveness and Reconciliation: Looking back 70 years on in Nagasaki

Gwyn MCCLELLAND

 

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park: a navigational meditation from the outside
Kim ROBERTS

 

Historical narratives and conservatives in modern Japan
Tess ROTHMAN

 

3:30pm-4:00pm

Afternoon tea (in Foyer)

4:00pm-5:30pm

Concurrent Panels

Applying the Logic of Southern Theory to Japanese Women’s University Kendo
Katherine SYLVESTER

 

Meister Eckhart, Eugen Herrigel and the European Reading of Japanese Budō
Samuel BAUDINETTE

 

Kimono craftscapes: creating an artisanal global narrative in the 21st century
Jenny HALL

 

A comparative analysis of Japanese language learners’ motivation in Australia and Korea
Toshiyuki NAKAMURA

 

Learning language with Web 2.0 is so difficult!!! Voices from Japanese language learners at a South Korean university

Hiromi NISHIOKA

 

The experiences of native English speaking teachers who work and live in Japan
Naoko INOUE

 

 

5:30pm-5:45pm

Closing

Prof Carolyn STEVENS
Prof Tessa MORRIS-SUZUKI

 

5:45pm-6:15pm

Networking (in Foyer)

6:30pm-

Symposium Dinner (@ Samsara Restaurant, Pinewood)
Presenters Only