Getting to know… Fay Anderson

Fay Anderson is currently working with Sally Young, Kate Darian-Smith and Michael Gawenda at the University of Melbourne, the National Library of Australia and the Walkley Foundation on a project examining the history of Australian newspaper photography. Their co-authored book Chasing the Picture: The History of Australian Press Photography will be published by Melbourne University Publishing in 2016

Getting to know…

1910003_795589783804662_8530565054210423479_nName: Fay Anderson

Title: Associate Professor

Faculty/Division: Arts

Dept: School of Media, Film and Journalism

Campus: Caulfield

 

How long have you worked at Monash?

I began working in the Journalism program as a media historian in 2012.

 

Where did you work prior to starting at the University?

Before my appointment at Monash, I worked at the Australian Centre at the University of Melbourne for over ten years.

 

What do you like best about your role?

Teaching curious and enthusiastic students, the opportunity to research and write on topics that intrigue me and my wonderful colleagues.

 

Why did you choose your current career path?

I never planned to be an academic. After completing Honours I worked very briefly as a journalist and lived in Paris and Jerusalem for several years. I returned home to Melbourne and embarked on my PhD in History while working in the heritage industry. I have always loved history, teaching, interviewing and writing so I have been extremely fortunate to have found my ideal vocation.

 

First job?

My first paid job was when I was eighteen working in a public bar in a suburban hotel with a fairly dodgy reputation. It was the era when barstaff were expected to stop fights and there seemed to be a lot of scuffles particulalry when the locals were released from Pentridge Jail.

 

Worst job?

Curiously not the job I previously mentioned. Probably running children’s parties with a friend who had to dress up as a giant rabbit.

 

What research/projects are you currently working on and what does it involve?

I’m fortunate to be working on two projects. The first is the history of Australian newspaper photography with Sally Young, Kate Darian-Smith and Michael Gawenda at the University of Melbourne and with our partners, the National Library of Australia and the Walkley Foundation. Our co-authored book Chasing the Picture: The History of Australian Press Photography will be published by Melbourne University Publishing in 2016. One of the most important initiatives is interviewing sixty press photographers and it’s been such a privilege to conduct these interviews with this amazing group of people.

 

The project’s website can be found here: http://ppia.esrc.info/website/index.html

 

The second project is on the Holocaust and Australian Journalism. It will result in a book, an online exhibition and a radio documentary.

 

What is your favourite place in the world and why?

Possibly a place I’ve yet to visit but if I have to choose then – Morocco, France, Italy and Canada. I’ve hiked in all these countries and it’s the best way to avoid tourist buses and discover the locals, cultural diversity, great food and sheer beauty.

 

What is your favourite place to eat and why?

There are so many places to choose from in Melbourne but a couple would include the Panama Dining Room for its ambience, St Crispen and Coda for excellent food, Alimentari and Three Bags Full for their brunch, Trinitas for local Thai and a host of others.

 

What is the best piece of advice you have received?

I have two: ‘take a risk’ and ‘comparison is the thief of joy’.

 

Master of Journalism with Warwick University

University of Warwick.
University of Warwick.

For those seeking a career in political and international journalism, the Master of Journalism with Warwick University is both an entry-level qualification and a mid-career course for working journalists seeking to extend their expertise, refresh the intellectual basis of their practice, and to enter the global market with a strong disciplinary grounding in Journalism as well as Politics and International Studies.

It has a national and international orientation designed to optimise the contribution graduates will make to their profession using a full range of media technologies.

The course is well suited for those aspiring to a career as a foreign correspondent.

About the Double Degree

The Master of Journalism (Double Masters with Warwick) is a double degree and will involve the student studying for two and a half-years full time.

Students will take the taught component of the Monash Master in Journalism and the taught component of one of the nine available Warwick Political and International Studies (PAIS) Master in Arts (MA) Degrees.

The Program will conclude with a joint dissertation (to be taken at either Monash or Warwick) with a supervisor from Monash and Warwick.

Upon successful completion, students will receive a Master of Journalism award from Monash and a Master of Arts in Politics and International Studies from Warwick.

For more information, visit our website here

 

Debate: Should the ABC be privatised?

240px-Australian_Broadcasting_Corporation.svgThe Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) has provided Australians with high quality and independent broadcasting since 1932.

There is no doubt that the ABC has a special place in our hearts as our national broadcaster.

But in today’s day and age, does the raison d’etre for the ABC still exist? Or has it become an unnecessary drain on the taxpayer dollar, one which the government and the Australian public should consider letting go?

The Monash Association of Debaters has the great pleasure of inviting you to the 2015 Vice Chancellor’s Public Debate.

Join us to hear six public figures debate the ever contentious issue: ‘That we should privatise the ABC’

The debate will be moderated by the Pro-Vice Chancellor – Professor David Copolov.

Entry is free and includes light refreshments. Refreshments will be served from 5:30pm and the debate will start at 6pm sharp.


SPEAKERS

Affirmative Team:

MR CHRIS BERG
Chris is a senior Fellow of the Institute of Public Affairs, a weekly columnist with the ABC’s The Drum and is a regular writer for major Australian papers. He is a strong defendant of free markets with particular interests in media and technology policy.

PROFESSOR STEPHEN KING
Professor King is the Professor of Economics and co-director of the Business Policy Forum at Monash University. He was also a Member of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) from 2004-2009.

MS BEATRICE PAULL
Beatrice is a current Monash Arts/Law student and a very successful member of MAD. She has debated in the finals of the Australasian and World Championships, and just last weekend represented Monash to the quarter-finals of the Women’s Australasian Championships, returning as 8th best speaker.


Negative Team:

MR GRAEME CONNELLY
Graeme is the President of the Victorian Branch of ABC Friends, an organization creating a national campaign to prevent budget cuts and centralization of the ABC. A passionate defender of our national broadcaster, he will have many insights on this topic.

MR TONY CLARK
Tony was the ALP candidate for Ringwood in the 2014 state election. He is now running as the ALP candidate for Deakin in the upcoming federal election, the most marginal Liberal-held seat in Victoria. In doing so, Tony is seeking to be the first ever blind federal Member of Parliament.

MS MELISSA MATTEO
Melissa is a Monash alumnus who was the Vice-President of MAD in 2014. She has had an extensive and successful debating career. Melissa has been a Quarter-Finalist at each of the Australasian Championship, World Debating Championship and Women’s Australasian Championship as well as Semi-Finalist at the Australian Easters Intervarsity Tournament.

EVENT DETAILS

Campus Centre Cinema
Building 10, Monash University, Clayton

Thursday October 8th
5.30pm – 7.30pm. The debate will start at 6pm sharp.

No RSVP required | Catering provided

For any enquiries, please contact Ambika at sponsorship@monashdebaters.com

Follow the link on Facebook.

 

VC Debate

 

Author Tom Doig awarded for The Coal Face

Monash PhD candidate and award-winning author Tom Doig.
Monash PhD candidate and award-winning author Tom Doig.

Monash University PhD candidate Tom Doig has been awarded the joint winner of the inaugural Oral History Victoria Education Innovation Award for his book, The Coal Face.

Sharon Huebner was the other joint winner for her oral history, Nidjuuk, Niih, Kaatitjin (Look, Learn, Listen).

The judges described Doig’s work as an “outstanding fusion of oral history, journalism and political activism”.

“Tom Doig has worked hard and well to collect impressive first person accounts of the fire and of the time before and after,” the judges wrote.

“He has written a compelling account that threads those accounts into his narrative almost seamlessly, so that although the book and the framing is his, the evidence and the power comes from the testimony.

“This is, by any measure an impressive and innovative example of contemporary activist oral history.” 

The Hazelwood Mine fire. Picture: Doug Steley
The Hazelwood Mine fire. Picture: Doug Steley

To achieve the Oral History Victoria award, Doig conducted extensive interviews with people, who live in the Latrobe Valley, were affected by the 2014 Hazelwood Mine Fire.

“These interviews were intimate, detailed and affecting – I tried to record as many sensory and emotional details as possible, along with precise facts and recollections, to ‘bring to life’ people’s experiences for the reader,” Doig said.

DSSI_0054800 Doug Steley
The Hazelwood Mine fire. Picture: Doug Steley

“After my initial interviews, I wrote a draft of the book and sent relevant sections of the draft to the people involved, so that they could fact-check my work, and add further details.

“In many cases I did follow-up interviews, sometimes up to half a dozen follow-up interviews, to gather the material necessary to tell the mine fire story through the eyes of its victims and its community heroes.

“It was very much a consensual, collaborative work in that respect.”

2015.02.19 The Coal Face FINAL COVERThe Coal Face is the story of the 2014 Hazelwood Mine Fire, its causes and the fallout that followed, told through the eyes of the people who experienced it.

It is a mix of narrative journalism, investigative journalism and oral history.

“In terms of form and style, I partially emulated John Hersey’s classic book Hiroshima, reconstructing people’s experiences in a style of literary realism/naturalism/minimalism,” Doig said.

” I also let the colloquial “voices” of each Latrobe Valley resident inform the prose of their section – there’s sprinklings of Aussie vernacular, words like ‘whatnot’, ‘weird’ and ‘clusterf**k’.”

The fire happened in February 2014, and Doig wrote the book as quickly as possible – researching from September to December 2014, writing from October 2014 to February 2015, with the book coming out on March 25, 2015.

The book was finished just one year after the Hazelwood fire was declared “safe” – although it wasn’t out.

Doig is writing an expanded version of The Coal Face for his journalism PhD. This will be completed late next year.

 

State-of-the-art media centre takes shape on B5

The student newsroom is taking shape, as the extensive wiring project is finalised for the state-of-the-art facility.
The student newsroom is taking shape, as the extensive wiring project is finalised for the state-of-the-art facility.

A new multi-million dollar media centre will be available to Monash University’s School of Media, Film and Journalism students for semester 1, 2016. The state-of-the-art media centre, based on Level 5 of Building B at Caulfield,  is an integrated teaching and production/research set of facilities incorporating staff and student work spaces, including:

  • Two laboratories/classrooms each with 24 student computer terminals, e-lecterns, interactive screens and optical-fibre cabling for synchronous and asynchronous blended teaching/learning activities.
  •  Two radio/sound production studios with an adjacent control-room/audio production and teaching suite.
  •  One open-plan newsroom which will become the centre of our students’ lives.
Monash journalism students will benefit from the state-of-the-art broadcast facilities.
Monash journalism students will benefit from the state-of-the-art broadcast facilities.

It will also include a broadcast TV and video production studio announcer/guest desk for six people, with mobile tripod mounted cameras, overhead lighting grid and full sound and vision cabling and graphics screen. It will feature:

  • An adjacent control room/vision mixing production and teaching suite, and
  • Construction of a new social space for students.
The control room of Monash's new media centre.
The control room of Monash’s new media centre.

“We are entering a tremendously exciting era in the teaching of Journalism at Monash,” said the program’s head, Associate Professor Phil Chubb. “Our students already receive the best Journalism education in the country and now that will be significantly enhanced. They will love it.” A cinema has been installed especially for the use of Monash film and screen students. Follow the media centre developments on Facebook and Twitter.

An artist's impression of the student newsroom on B5 at Monash Caulfield.
An artist’s impression of the student newsroom on B5 at Monash Caulfield.

 

Journalism Futures: New York Field School

TheNewYorkTimes_DavidFlores_CreativeCommons-forweb

© David Flores
Title: The New York Times
Creative Commons license

Change and innovation are sweeping through newsrooms around the globe.

In this unit, students will travel to the heart of the world’s media industry to observe how industrial crisis and creative responses are transforming news organisations, journalists and audiences in the American context.

The program begins online in November, when students will delve into the history, structure, culture and products of leading and cutting-edge American media outlets.

To learn more about the New York Field School, click here or contact Dr Steph Brookes and Dr Deb Anderson.

How have these outlets responded to the pressures of changing consumption patterns, delivery platforms and business models?

To follow, students must attend an intensive workshop at Monash University (Caulfield) to develop skills in research project design, methods and management. This session will help students prepare well for their international field trip.

Then, over 10 days in December, students will travel to New York and Washington DC, to learn firsthand how newsrooms are adapting to change. What is it like to be a media practitioner in the contemporary era?

How are news values shifting to capture ‘modern’ audiences, now and in future? And are the foundations of journalism in a liberal democracy – notions of independence, objectivity and fairness – changing too?

Students will draw from scholarly and popular literature as well their immersive experience to formulate individual research projects, adopting a case-study approach to their chosen topic.

To learn more about the New York Field School, click here or contact Dr Steph Brookes and Dr Deb Anderson.

 

Journalism students prepare for OS assignments

Nick Parkin.
Nick Parkin.

Monash University journalism students will have the opportunity to travel to Cambodia, India and Nepal next year to gain real and practical experience reporting on community development issues.

The joint initiative between Monash University, Engineers Without Borders and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, will see journalism students join a humanitarian engineering “study tour” of the region.

The students will research, investigate and report on topics related to the fields of humanitarian engineering and community development, and will create innovative and original stories across digital, print, video and audio mediums.

The program will be coordinated by Monash journalism teacher Nick Parkin, and has received almost $60,000 in funding from the Federal Government’s New Colombo Plan.

“This program will be a chance for our students to create meaningful and worthwhile pieces of journalism, while focusing on a highly underreported area of international development,” Mr Parkin said.

“I’m looking forward to seeing the innovative stories our best and brightest students will create,” he said.

The study tours of Cambodia, India and Nepal are expected to take place during holiday periods in 2016 and early 2017.

To learn about the New Colombo plan, click here

 

 

Getting to know … Deb Anderson

Deb Anderson does research in rural places, wild places – asking people to share their oral history, often over several years.

Getting to know … Deb Anderson

Name: Dr Deb AndersonIOQTymAMa6E4QLKbZyeVuwpXUAuNGc83YrO7KFbqBRo

Title: Lecturer

Faculty/Division: Arts

Deptartment: Journalism

Campus: Caulfield

 

How long have you worked at Monash?

I began at Monash part-time in 2011, while juggling full-time work at The Age and finishing my PhD. Yep, it was nuts – but it paid off, when I gained a full-time position here last year.

 

Where did you work prior to starting at the University?

For a decade I was a journalist and subeditor with The Age and Sydney Morning Herald. Before that, I tried several weird and wonderful jobs in far-flung places – from IT analyst in Seoul to organic pig farmer in southern France.

 

What do you like best about your role?

The people. I have some of the best colleagues one could ask for.

 

Why did you choose your current career path?

There were elements of choice, but also circumstance and serendipity. I grew up in the bush, inland from Cairns. Moving to the city is what many country kids are forced to do – for a university education or job (rural unemployment is rife). I wish I could still live in the wet tropics and commute to Monash! But I did choose this combination of teaching, research and journalism. It draws together my interests, which centre on storytelling and a bid to help young people make the most of life’s opportunities.

 

First job?

Dairy slave – I mean, farmhand. As a kid, after school I’d round up the cows and help out with the milking. Five cents a day! Luckily, I loved it.

 

Worst job?

IT analysis wasn’t my cup of tea, but really, unemployment is the pits.

 

What research/projects are you currently working on and what does it involve?

My research is done in rural places, wild places – asking people to share their oral history, often over several years. I’m interested in how people tell and retell stories of their experience of extreme weather, and how these stories are shaped by (among other things) place, identity and class. Late last year, my first book was published – Endurance: Australian Stories of Drought (CSIRO Publishing, 2014). Since then I’ve been interviewing people about cyclones in Queensland – particularly Cyclone Larry (2006) and Cyclone Yasi (2011).

 

What is your favourite place in the world and why?

The dairy farm I grew up on. My parents bought the place when I was three. It’s beautiful; it encompasses dense rainforest that adjoins a World-Heritage listed national park.

 

What is your favourite place to eat and why?

City Wine Shop on Spring Street, for the wine list (of course), location and lovely green-tiles-and-wood interior.

 

What is the best piece of advice you have received?

‘It takes all types to make a world, love.’ Thanks Mum!

 

Tell us something about yourself that your colleagues wouldn’t know?

Such is my love of yoghurt that I refer to that aisle of the supermarket as my friends in the fridge …

 

Hayne on the verge of cracking 49ers’ roster

Jarryd Hayne.
Jarryd Hayne.

Cross-code convert Jarryd Hayne is on the verge of winning a coveted spot in the San Francisso 49er’s 53-man roster, according to sports journalism expert Julie Tullberg.

Julie, who teaches digital journalism in Monash’s journalism program, was invited to speak on Boston University’s Only a Game program, hosted by Bill Littlefield. Only a Game is a sports program on Boston news station, WBUR.

Listen to Julie’s commentary here

Julie, a former digital sports editor with the Herald Sun who is also qualified in sports science and physical education, says Hayne has the characteristics of a champion athlete.

“Hayne is such a very determined character, who is a great student of NFL, and he’s been studying it for two years,” Julie told Bill Littlefield.

“Hayne has travelled to the US with friends, other footballers from Australia, to watch the game and totally absorb it.

“And he’s just super quick and powerful. And I think he can make it, and I think he’ll continue to make a statement.”

Hayne has made the 75-man 49ers’ roster, announced today. The final roster will be announced on September 5.

San Francisco 49er’s coach Jim Tomsula told reporters he was “pretty confident in Jarryd’s abilty to field the ball”.

“I’ve watched a ton of tape of him fielding a rugby ball. I’ve seen him in practice, and in game situations,” Tomsula told reporters.

“I feel very good about his ability to field. I feel good about his ability to perform with ball in his hands on special teams.

“The tackling, coverage part, I’ve seen lot of improvement. I’ve seen what I need to see. There’s been a great evaluation on him.”

 

Getting to know … Aleczander Gamboa

Aleczander Gamboa.
Aleczander Gamboa.

Aleczander Gamboa’s dream job is becoming an editor in chief of a fashion and lifestyle magazine.

 

Getting to know …

Name: Aleczander Gamboa

Course: Bachelor of Arts

Faculty/Division: Arts

Dept: Media and Communication

Campus: Caulfield


What has been the best aspect of studying journalism at Monash?

The hands-on approach and learning from tutors who have had real “on the field” experience. Everything you learn about journalism at Monash is easily transferrable to the real-life media rooms. You also build up a portfolio to later show employers what you’re capable of.

Do you balance uni life with a job?

Yes I do – I’m a contractor who freelances with different organisations in my spare time.

Why did you choose to study journalism at Monash?

The journalism major at Monash offered a diverse range of subjects to its students, from lifestyle journalism, producing digital news and broadcast journalism. I knew that the journalism major would equip me with a versatile range of skills, but also give me a freedom to choose journalism subjects that I was really passionate in, as opposed to having it chosen for us.

 

What is your dream job in journalism?

Editor in chief of a magazine, preferable in fashion and lifestyle. GQ would be the dream!

Who has been your biggest career influence and why?

Julie Tullberg, who taught me last year, has continued to be an excellent mentor to me. Her experience in the media and communications field is second to none. She always been very welcoming in providing me with honest valuable feedback for my work, as well as getting me through thick and thin when I had some challenging experiences.

The second is more of a general one, and that is fashion icon Tom Ford. He single handedly revived Gucci, started his own fashion empire and basically just did it all even if he received flak for it. I hope to one day emulate his level of work ethic in my own future endeavours.

First job?

Waiter at La Porchetta.

Worst job?

I don’t really count any of my previous jobs as the ‘worst job’ as I see all of them as learning experiences nonetheless.

 

What is your favourite place in the world and why?

Bookstores – I love its quiet environment and being transported into different realities in books. I could spend all day there.

 

What is your favourite place to eat and why?

I eat everything, so I don’t really have a favourite place! But if I were to really pick one, it would be Shandong Mama on Bourke St – those dumplings are literally heaven.

What is the best piece of advice you have received?

“Leave your s*** at the door” – something my VCE drama teacher would always tell us. It means that no matter what struggles you are going through in life, never let it get in the way of your professionalism. Leave your battles at the door and deal with it after.

Tell us something about yourself that your uni colleagues wouldn’t know?

I’m a die hard Pokemon fan, like even to the point where I want to get a pokeball tattooed on me in the future.

 

Dr Anderson to chat with Nobel Prize winner

Dr Deb Anderson
Dr Deb Anderson.

Monash University’s journalism lecturer Dr Deb Anderson will engage in conversation with Laureate Professor Peter Doherty at the Melbourne Writers Festival on Saturday, August 29 at 2.30pm.

Scientific knowledge used to be power. Professor Doherty argues that the powerful now try to deny scientists’ knowledge, particularly on climate change.

The Nobel Prize winner explores how science works and asks what non-scientist citizens can do to reclaim both power and knowledge. In conversation with Dr Deb Anderson at ACMI Cinema 1 at Federation Square on August 29 at 2.30pm.

Discover more Superstars of Science sessions

See more and save! This session is available on a 5 Pack or 10 Pack. Purchase a MWF ticket pack here.

 

Conscious consumers to benefit from pop-up shop

Janene_3
Janene Trickey.

In this modern world of 24/7 work, unaffordable housing, consumerism and waste, have you ever longed for a simpler life: A life less hurried, more true to your ethical values and in touch with your community?

Janene Trickey did.

She left her marketing job in the city to go back to uni and complete a double masters in journalism and sustainability at Monash University. The time out allowed her to imagine a new future.

“Marketing is a young person’s game. I can’t imagine doing that in my 60s or 70s, and I doubt I’d be employable in that arena at that age even if I wanted to be,” Janene said.

Read Janene’s profile here

The result of this pondering is online store Evolution Emptor, which will soon pop up for a limited time in Pin Oak Crescent, Flemington.

Janene_2-2
Janene Trickey has established has established Evolution Emptor, which offers a lifestyle collection for conscious consumers.

Her website, evolutionemptor.com.au, provides a lifestyle collection and community for conscious consumers – evolved shoppers who care if the products they buy have caused harm to people, animals or the environment.

The online store stocks stylish products from small Australian businesses dedicated to principles of sustainable manufacturing.

The collection includes clothing basics, accessories, homewares, beauty products, cleaning products and gifts.

“The products we stock, first of all, have to be well designed and functional. We then check the supply chain to ensure the highest standards of workplace safety, conditions and environmental protection have been applied to their manufacture,” Janene said.

Some of the products have been made overseas, but most have been designed and developed by small Australian businesses.

“We want to support Australian designers who are as passionate about sustainability as we are. The collection will evolve as we find stylish new products that meet our strict criteria,” Janene said.

The Evolution Emptor pop-up shop will be located at 64 Pin Oak Crescent Flemington from October 17 to December 24 and will be open from 11am to 5pm, Thursday to Monday.

 

Getting to know … Janene Trickey

Janene_2-2
Janene Trickey.

Masters journalism and sustainability student, Janene Trickey, has established an online store, Evolution Emptor, which offers a lifestyle collection for conscious consumers.

Getting to know …

Name: Janene Trickey

Faculty/Division:  Arts, Double Masters Journalism/Sustainability

Campus: Caulfield/Clayton

What is your academic background? Bachelor of Business (20 years ago) and now three subjects to go in Double Masters Journalism/Sustainability. 

What research are you currently working on and what does it involve?  I established Evolution Emptor as an online store and community for conscious consumers in October 2014 for some part-time income while I studied.

I’m now keen to make this my full-time (paying) job by the time I complete my studies in 2016.

My days involve blogging and sourcing blog articles from contributors; discovering cool, new, sustainably made products for the online store; social media to promote the store; website development; packing and shipping orders and, of course, my studies.

I also have kids, and they’re my number one priority. There are never enough hours in the day. Luckily I don’t mind working seven days a week at all hours.


How do you combine your research with work commitments?

I quit my job in marketing communications in June 2013 to study full time, which I did for a year.

I’m fortunate to have been able to afford to take this time out from paid work to pursue something I can be passionate about. My savings are certainly dwindling though!


What do you like best about your research?

I like the flexibility of working from home. I can meet a friend for a two hour lunch and know I’ll be productive later in the evening to compensate.

I love developing and finding new products, though I’ve made that difficult for myself as I need to ensure they are sustainably made by asking questions about the raw materials used, working conditions in the factory and lifecycle impacts.

I opened a popup shop for seven weeks during the mid-semester break and it was great to meet customers face-to-face and tell them the stories behind each product.

People here are becoming more interested in buying more ethically, though we have a long way to go to catch up to Europe and California and New York.

 

Why did you choose to become a HDR student? I decided to study at Monash because I was feeling a little stale in the workforce and wanted to be more challenged academically.

I thought journalism would extend my skills as a marketing communicator and sustainability was an interest. It seemed like a good idea to combine the two.

First job? My first job was in a supermarket, like many other people.

 

Worst job? My worst job was my first out of university where I was responsible for administration for a small not-for-profit organisation, including accounts and reports for the Board.

I remember being at work after midnight one Friday night before the weekend Board meeting crying because I couldn’t get the accounts to reconcile. I left pretty soon after that.

 

What is your favourite place in the world and why? I’m about to go to Italy for a family holiday, so I may find some new favourite places then. One of my favourite places here though is a short walk in The Grampians National Park to Venus Baths.

The creek runs through the rock to create pools big enough to slide into.

The water is murky, there are sticks and sharp stones at the bottom of the pools and your bathers get totally wrecked in the seat, but it’s great natural, outdoor, unsanitised fun with the kids in summer.

 

What is your favourite place to eat and why? I meet one of my best friend’s for lunch every Wednesday at Pepper café in Flemington.

The food is good and reasonably priced and there’s a fire going in winter.

I feel that community is where my kids and I belong and hope to move back there in the next couple of years. I’m a few suburbs away at the moment.

 

What is the best piece of advice you have received?  Ask my kids and they’ll tell you I’m full of advice. I think my favourite sayings, or at least the ones they hear the most, are: “only boring people get bored”; “it can’t possibly be everyone else, perhaps it’s your attitude that needs to change”; and “wouldn’t the world be a boring place if we were all the same”.

Usually it’s in response to something or someone they’re complaining about: I don’t have much sympathy for that.

When I was in that job I hated, my Dad suggested I simultaneously pursue three alternative paths and follow the one that worked out first.

I planned an overseas trip, applied for other jobs and looked into further study. I ended up getting a new job that I liked. I think that was pretty good advice.

 

Tell us something about yourself that we wouldn’t know? I’m a pretty open book. I doubt there’s anything about me that someone doesn’t know.

To learn more about Janene’s business, click here: Evolution Emptor 

 

Footy and the Media: The Off-Field Game

Investigations expert Bill Birnbauer.
Monash senior lecturer of journalism Bill Birnbauer.

Do sports stars give up a right to privacy with their success? Do journalists have a right to ask them about their personal lives?

One week after the media spectacle that is the AFL Grand Final, join our panellists as they discuss where the line between personal and public lives should be drawn.

The panel’s speakers at the New News event, at the Wheeler Centre on Saturday, October 10, include Monash senior lecturer Bill Birnbauer,  Monash sports lecturer Dr Tom Heenan, the AFL head of content Matthew Pinkney, barrister Natalie Hickey, ABC investigative reporter Louise Milligan and AFL commentator and Hawthorn premiership player Terry Wallace.

New News by the Centre for Advancing Journalism is a three-day series looking at the present and future of journalism – and an exploration of the most up-to-the-moment developments in how journalism and the media can create and support engaged citizenship.

Dr Tom Heenan.
Dr Tom Heenan.

Exchange ideas directly with the industry’s most respected professionals.

Panellists this year will represent mastheads both new and established – including the Age, Herald SunSaturday Paper, Crikey and Junkee.

You’ll also hear from prominent bloggers, freelancers and media entrepreneurs.

They’ll be joined by leading journalism researchers from Swinburne University of Technology and the Centre for Advancing Journalism at the University of Melbourne.

This event is also available for booking as part of the Saturday Day Pass.

 

Alana Mitchelson stars at the Indy

Alana_Mitchelson_landscape_shot
Alana Mitchelson.

Pulliam Journalism Fellow and Monash journalism graduate Alana Mitchelson has enjoyed success at the Indy Star newspaper in the United States, producing many lead news stories.

Alana won a fellowship to work in the Indy Star newsroom, based in Indianapolis, for three months.

“Reflecting on my experiences in America thus far, an overseas reporting trip has been truly eye-opening and is definitely one of the greatest decisions I have ever made,” Alana said.

Read Alana’s work here

“The experience has been invaluable and I have met so many talented people who I know I will remain in contact with for many years to come.

“It has given me a different perspective of the industry and I feel that it has enabled me to solidify in my mind the kind of journalism I wish to pursue in the future.”

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Alana said there was a strong focus on analytics in the American newsroom.

“All of the top stories performing the best online at any given time are displayed on large television screens situated at various points across the newsroom,” Alana said.

“So everyone is always very conscious of which articles are doing well and those that aren’t.”

Alana has covered the Brickyard 400 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway where the famous Indy 500 race takes place. She has also enjoyed various journalistic challenges and has scored a number of front-page stories.

“Being new to the city and the United States, the work has been both challenging and exciting,” Alana said.

“Editors have asked me to try my hand at reporting on local American politics and to write about their unfamiliar educational system which includes charter schools.

“In terms of the writing style, I have noticed some slight differences. First-person features are more commonly used by reporters and I think this goes hand in hand with their emphasis on also building audiences for individual reporters – something which seems to be more of a focus for broadcast journalist personalities in Australia.”

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Getting to know MFJ manager Jodie Wood

Jodie Wood, manager of the School of Media, Film and Journalism & National Centre for Australian Studies.
Jodie Wood, manager of the School of Media, Film and Journalism &
National Centre for Australian Studies.

Jodie Wood, the manager of the School of Media, Film and Journalism, has been working at Monash for 26 years. She is passionate about Monash and helping make a difference to students and staff.

Name: Jodie Wood

Title: School Manager

Faculty/Division: Faculty of Arts

Dept: School of Media, Film and Journalism

Campus: Caulfield

How long have you worked at Monash? 26 years

Where did you work prior to starting? Casual work at hotels.

What do you like best about your role? Hopefully making a difference to staff and students experience at Monash.

Why did you choose your current career path? Natural progression.

First job? Casual work at hotels

Worst job? None

What is your favourite place in the world and why? Venice, love the water!

What is your favourite place to eat and why? Takeaway at home, love being at home but prefer someone else to cook.

What is the best piece of advice you have received? You can’t do everything.

Tell us something about yourself that your colleagues wouldn’t know? I LOVE to renovate, build, etc, and stage manage festivals/theatre, etc.

 

Journalism education at Monash University

TV journalism lecturer Nick Parkin chats with a student at Monash Open Day on Sunday, August 2 at Caulfield.
TV journalism lecturer Nick Parkin chats with a student at Monash Open Day on Sunday, August 2 at Caulfield.

Journalism staff and students engaged with secondary school students and their parents during Monash’s Open Day at Clayton and Caulfield campuses on Sunday, August 2.

The students were informed of the exciting developments in the journalism program, including the $3 million state-of-the-art facilities, which will be operational early next year.

Please click here to see the Open Day presentation on Journalism and Journalism Education at Monash University (PDF)

TV journalism lecturer Nick Parkin (pictured right) was one of many staff members who engaged with the public on what was an exciting day for many young people.

 

Getting to know … Phil Chubb

Monash University’s Head of Journalism Phil Chubb.
Monash University’s Head of Journalism Phil Chubb.

Monash Head of Journalism Associate Professor Phil Chubb says the best thing about his role is enabling students to understand how to acquire the skills of journalism and how to apply them in contemporary media.

Getting to know…

Name: Phil Chubb

Title: Associate Professor

Faculty/Division: Arts/Media, Film and Journalism

Department: Journalism

Campus: Caulfield

How long have you worked at Monash? Seven years.

Where did you work prior to starting at the University? Media industry.

What do you like best about your role? Enabling students to understand how to acquire the skills of journalism and how to apply them in contemporary media.

Why did you choose your current career path? I wanted to change the world.

First job? The Age.

Worst job? No job has been that bad.

What research/projects are you currently working on and what does it involve? My research involves environmental communications and politics.

What is your favourite place in the world and why? New York. It is the media capital, but so much more.

What is your favourite place to eat and why? Italy 1 in Camberwell.

What is the best piece of advice you have received? Always stay the distance.

Tell us something about yourself that your colleagues wouldn’t know? Every week that North Melbourne is not at the top of the ladder is a week I shrivel inside just a little bit more.

 

 

Hannah, Kate named Walkley scholarship finalists

Monash University journalism students Hannah Scholte and Kate Wong Hoy have been named finalists for the 2015 Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship.

Hannah Scholte is a finalist for the 2015 Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship.
Hannah Scholte is a finalist for the 2015 Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship.

Hannah and Kate will compete for the prestigious award against five other finalists, including Annalise Bolt (University of New South Wales), Sam Cucchiara (RMIT University), Christina Guo (University of Sydney), Lucy Hinton (RMIT University) and Naeun Kim (Macquarie University).

This scholarship was established with the generous support of journalist and producer Anita Jacoby, to honour the memory of her father Phillip Jacoby– a pioneer in the Australian electronics and broadcast technology industry.

Hannah is  excited to be in the running to win a career-changing scholarship program.

“I don’t think I could dream up a program more appealing to me at this point in my career, so I’m very pleased to be chosen as a finalist and incredibly excited about the prospect of being successful in taking it,” Hannah said.

“I’m passionate about pursuing video journalism, so gaining experience in the media workplaces involved and completing a short course at the same time would be an invaluable opportunity.”

Katie said she was very grateful and honoured to have been selected as a finalist for the Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship.

Monash University's Kate Wong Hoy is a 2015 Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship finalist.
Monash University’s Kate Wong Hoy is a 2015 Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship finalist.

“It is an incredible opportunity and I am thrilled to have reached this stage,” she said.

“One of the videos I submitted was a current affairs story that I filmed on my Mum’s stroke recovery story and it is a piece I am very proud of.

“It is amazing that it has now been recognised by industry professionals. I have dreamed about being a television journalist for years and I am so excited to be one step closer to realising that dream.”

Final-year journalism students and recent graduates, with a passion for investigative or long-form television reporting, were encouraged to apply for the 12-week paid internship.

The winner will spend eight weeks at the Nine Network, four weeks at The Walkley Foundation and complete at least one TV production course through the open program at AFTRS.

They will also be mentored by senior journalist members of The Walkley Advisory Board and work with and learn from some of Australia’s leading journalists and producers.

The scholarship is open to students 26 years and under enrolled in journalism or communication studies at an Australian university.

The winner will be announced at the Walkley mid-year Celebration in Sydney on July 29, 2015.

 

Dani wins the Herb Thomas Memorial Trust award

From left: Herb Thomas Memorial Trust chairman Roger Hall, Monash University's Dani Rothwell, Star News Group editor Garry Howe,  RMIT's Sian Johnson and Lauren McKinnon.
From left: Herb Thomas Memorial Trust chairman Roger Hall, Monash University’s Dani Rothwell, Star News Group editor Garry Howe, RMIT’s Sian Johnson and Lauren McKinnon.

Dani Rothwell has won the Herb Thomas Memorial Trust award as the most outstanding journalism student in the Bachelor of Professional Communication degree at Monash University.

Dani, who was presented with her award at a function in Pakenham on May 5, has been awarded with prize money to help pursue her career within the industry.

Dr Paul Atkinson represented Monash University’s School of Media, Film and Journalism at the awards night.

“Members of the interview panel lauded Dani’s involvement with local community groups and her commitment to highlighting the challenges faced by young people in the region,” Dr Atkinson said.

“The award is managed by the Berwick, Pakenham and Narre Warren Rotary clubs and is presented in honour of Herb Thomas, a respected journalist and newspaper proprietor of the Pakenham Gazette.”

Dani said she believed the ability to create lasting change within a community relied on being able to effectively communicate.

“Like many others, I share the desire to create change and leave the world a better place,” she said.

“As clichéd as it is, over my years of community involvement, I have found a key difference between people who achieve their desire and those who do not.”

Dani said change started with identifying a problem and creating a great solution.

“For me, the problem within my local community was that young people were killing themselves. Young people were left alone, and had nowhere to turn,” she said.

“I understand that these are generalisations and that many other factors were at play, but the bottom-line is that young people were dying unnecessarily.

“As a passionate believer in the power of young people as change agents, this left me heartbroken. After a period of grief and negativity, I embraced this as an identified problem that needed a long lasting solution. This is when I realised the power of investigative communication.”

Dani, who is president of the Monash Union of Berwick Students,  hopes to be a national political reporter in the future.