Seminar by Susanna Scarparo (Monash University)

‘Reconfiguring the Mother–Daughter Relationship in Francesca Comencini’s Lo spazio bianco, A/Prof. Susanna Scarparo, December 7 2012, 5.30pm, Italian Institute of Culture, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra

 In this seminar, Susanna Scarparo discusses ways in which Francesca Comencini’s Lo spazio bianco shifts the attention from the institution of motherhood and mother–daughter relationships to the complex and intimate account of the experience of bringing a daughter into this world from a mother’s point of view.

This event is presented by RISM.

 

Seminar by Bruno Mascitelli (Swinburne University)

‘Italy: The illusive chase to further political transition amidst political and economic crisis’, Dr Bruno Mascitelli (Swinburne University), November 20 2012, 5.30, Italian Institute of Culture, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra  

 Dr Mascitelli’s presentation will first consider that Italy since the political crisis of the early 1990s and the political period of transition of the “Second Republic” has been defined by its stumbling from one crisis to the next, with parties and governments incapable and unwilling to forego their self-interest and govern across special interest groups. Dr Mascitelli will then examine the reasons why the political transformation never occurred and why it could not.

This event is presented by RISM.

 

Seminar by Peter Howard (September 2)

 

 

RISM 

 and the Italian Cultural Institute

 have great pleasure in inviting you to a talk in English on

  

images-17Charting Cultural Transformation through Renaissance Preaching

by

A/Prof Peter Howard (Monash University)

 

Monday 2 September at 6pm

Italian Cultural Institute

233 Domain Road

South Yarra

 

 

How did the artists of the Sistine Chapel wall frescoes develop and execute a complex programme in an amazingly short period of time? How do we explain the configuration of public space in early Renaissance Italy? Who authorized the magnificent display that characterizes Renaissance Florence? These are just some of the questions on which light is shed if an expansive role is assigned to preaching in late medieval and early renaissance Italy. This argument is a reversal of the image of the mendicant “penitential preachers” that Burckhardt constructed a century and a half ago but that still prevails, even among some scholars. Most commonly, the historiography identifies the humanists as the innovators of the day and as the disseminators of a renewed classical culture. This can be overemphasized. I argue that evidence suggests that a traditional medium such as the sermon was just as, if not more, responsible for a new historical and social vocabulary which equipped Florentines in particular to meet the demands of a rapidly changing society.

 For catering purposes please book at bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it

Tel. 03 – 9866 5931

For more information on RISM please contact Dr Patrizia Sambuco (Monash University): patrizia.sambuco@monash.edu

 

Seminar on Authority and Translation in Early Renaissance Italy

image_preview

RISM  

 and the Italian Cultural Institute

have great pleasure in inviting you to a talk in English on

 Authority and Translation in Early Renaissance Italy

by

Andrea Rizzi (University of Melbourne)

Wednesday 7 August at 5.30pm

Italian Cultural Institute

233 Domain Road

South Yarra

In ancient Rome, translation between languages was always free and aggressive. It was only with the translation of the Bible into Latin that the notion of faithful translation was introduced. Fifteenth-century Italian translators went back to the ancient Roman understanding of translation as aggressive appropriation of the source text and culture. As a result, early Renaissance translators such as Bruni, Poliziano and Filelfo saw translation as an opportunity to displace the Greek culture that was being rediscovered while at the same time imitating and surpassing the Latin culture of antiquity. Through an analysis of translators’ prefaces, this paper shows that Italian Renaissance scholars rewrote and displaced classical and medieval texts and effectively became the new authors of their past culture.

Please note: Cinema passes for the next Lavazza Italian Film Festival will be drawnfor ICI Members who attend this event.

Free event

For catering purposes please book at bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it

Tel. 03 – 9866 5931

 

 

Seminar by Dr Sabina Sestigiani

 

falcone_borsellino.jpg

RISM (Research in Italian Studies at Melbourne) and the Italian Cultural Institute

  have great pleasure in inviting you to a talk in English on

 Leonardo Sciascia and Peter Robb: a discordant view

on the anti-mafia pool in Palermo in the 1980s

Monday 17 June at 5.30pm

Italian Cultural Institute

233 Domain Road

South Yarra

 In this seminar Dr Sabina Sestigiani (Swinburne University) will analyse Leonardo Sciascia’s sceptical opinions in regard to the anti-mafia pool in Palermo in the 1980s and Peter Robb’s portrayal of the mafia and anti-mafia phenomenon in his book Midnight in Sicily.

Dr Sestigiani will discuss the sensation caused in Italy by  Sciascia’s famous article “I professionisti dell’antimafia“, published in the Italian daily Il Corriere della Sera in 1987.

 Please note: Cinema passes for the next Lavazza Italian Film Festival will be drawn

for ICI Members who attend this event.

 Free event

 For catering purposes please book at bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it

Tel. 03 – 9866 5931

For more information on RISM please contact Dr Patrizia Sambuco (Monash University): patrizia.sambuco@monash.edu

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Italian Studies (by research)

Areas: Italian literary, cultural and cinema studies. Intercultural and migration studies. Italian history. Translation studies. Joint supervision with other schools in the Faculty is also possible. The thesis topic must be determined in consultation with the supervisor, who is to be selected in consultation with the graduate coordinator. Detailed information about staff’s research interests and expertise can be found in their individual staff profiles.

Thesis length: 80,000 – 100,000 words

Candidature: Three years full-time or six years part-time

Prospective research students should refer to How to Apply. The first step is to complete the on-line Pre-Application Form.

 

Master of Arts in Italian Studies (by research)

Areas: Italian literary, cultural and cinema studies. Intercultural and migration studies. Italian history. Translation studies. Joint supervision with other schools in the Faculty is also possible. The thesis topic must be determined in consultation with the supervisor, who is to be selected in consultation with the graduate coordinator. Detailed information about staff’s research interests and expertise can be found in their individual staff profiles.

Thesis length: 30,000 – 40,000 words

Candidature: Two years full-time or four years part-time

Prospective research students should refer to How to Apply. The first step is to complete the on-line Pre-Application Form.

 

Graduate Diploma in Languages (Italian)

Students who have completed a Bachelors degree in any field may study Italian by enrolling in a Graduate Diploma.

Course structure

This course is equivalent to one year full-time (48 points), but as language units must be studied sequentially it is normally completed over three years. The Diploma is suitable for beginners or those with intermediate levels of competence.

Students normally take a three-year sequence of language units (commencing at the appropriate level for their starting competence) as well as two additional units (one at either second or third year levels and another at third year levels).

 

General Information

Attendance

Regular attendance at lectures and tutorials, particularly language acquisition classes where continuity is crucial for the development and maintenance of linguistic competence, is strongly advised. Since most assessment procedures are based on continuous assessment, regular attendance and participation are essential. Students whose attendance is poor are, in effect, penalising themselves. Moreover, in the case of language courses in particular, absenteeism impacts on the work of other students, and the class as a whole.

Class attendance and participation will be taken into account in all borderline cases (i.e. including differences of grade as well as Pass/Fail) in the return of final results.

Consultation

All lecturers will be available for consultation. Consultation times are displayed on all office doors. Other times can be arranged by appointment.

Essays/Assignments

Students are required to hand in essays and homework by the due date. All essays and homework must be placed in the appropriate essay-boxes or handed directly to tutors. If you need help with essay writing, short intensive courses for Arts students are offered by the Language and Learning Unit. For further information contact Tim Moore, (Tel. 9905 5069).

Student Assignment Coversheets can be downloaded here. As the coversheet changes from time to time in order to adhere to changes in university policy, please do not save the coversheet locally, rather download and print it each time you need a new copy.

Noticeboard

Italian notice boards are located on Level 5 (west wing), Menzies Building. Information about assignments, course organization and other departmental activities will be posted on these boards as well as in course booklets. Students should check MUSO unit sites regularly for updated information or downloads.

Timetabling and Allocation to Classes

Students should check the Italian notice boards on Level 5 (Clayton Campus) for room allocations, as well as the official university timetable at:
http://mutts.monash.edu.au/

Students can allocate into classes at:
http://allocate.its.monash.edu.au/

To view PDF files you will need to download and install Adobe Reader.

 

Presentation of Written Work

  1. All major essays should be submitted with a School assignment cover sheet.(Assignment cover sheets can be obtained from School Office on Level 4, South Wing).
    Student Assessment Coversheets can also be downloaded here [PDF 1.6 MB]. As the coversheet changes from time to time in order to adhere to changes in university policy, please do not save the coversheet locally, rather download and print it each time you need a new copy.
  2. To ensure legibility and ease of marking, type on one side of the paper only. As well, please type on alternate lines (double spacing).
  3. Plagiarism: An important aspect of essay writing is the use made of secondary material, work which scholars and critics have produced to enrich and widen a particular area of interest. You may like to use some of these ideas to reinforce your own arguments – if you do so, you must acknowledge your source. Failure to acknowledge is considered a form of cheating (plagiarism) and, as such, the piece of work will not be assessed and disciplinary action may be taken.
    When you do like what someone else has to say and want to use it;
    i) place any direct citation in quotation marks;
    ii) if you have changed the wording of someone else’s original idea, footnote your source.
  4. References (for Bibliography, etc.): When citing reference works for bibliographies or footnotes, titles of books and periodicals should be underlined (if handwritten) or in italics (if typed);

e.g. Marchi, C., Impariamo l’italiano, Milan: Rizzoli, 1984.
Marchi, C., Impariamo l’italiano , Milan: Rizzoli, 1984.

Titles of journal articles or chapters in books should be contained within inverted commas;

e.g. Rosenthal, M. F., “Veronica Franco’s Terze Rime: The Venetian Courtesan’s Defense”,Renaissance Quarterly 42 (1989): 310-323

For further reference, consult the M.L.A. Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations , New York, Modern Language Association, (latest edition).

Students familiar with the author-date system, common in social science disciplines (i.e.: as in most secondary reading for the unit The Italian Migrant Experience), should be consistent in its use.

To view PDF files you will need to download and install Adobe Reader.

 

Policy on Submission of Assignments

Students are required to hand in essays and homework by the due date. All essays and homework must be placed in the appropriate essay-boxes or handed directly to tutors.

The following policy applies in all language teaching units:

  • For work relating to language acquisition the due date is final; late work cannot be accepted (except where appropriate reason/certification are produced).
  • For major essays and assignments relating to the cultural, literary and/or socio-linguistic components of courses, late work will be accepted until two weeks following the due date, incurring a penalty of 2% per day. After two weeks, work will not be accepted for marking purposes (except where appropriate reasons/certification are provided).
  • Students applying for an extension should normally do so at least one week in advance and should obtain the permission of the unit coordinator or their tutor.

 

Ways to Enhance your Learning

Whether you are beginning Italian or continuing at post-VCE level, the greater the exposure to the language the greater your progress will be: maybe you’re not ready yet for the richness of Italian literature, or for reading an article in a magazine or newspaper, but there are many ways of increasing your exposure to Italian without feeling unduly threatened or stressed. Just listening to songs, for example, will give you a feel for the sounds of the language. So here’s some information about where materials are available.

TV & Video

  • “Italianissimo” (BBC beginner course) – available from Main Library multimedia section, with audiotapes and textbook, for use in library only.
  • Telegiornale italiano – weekdays at 7.00 am; SBS Television broadcasts Italian news daily and Italia news on Sundays.
  • Check the Age Green Guide for Italian films, soaps, documentaries.
  • A small collection of films is available for viewing in the Library.
  • A WORD ON SUBTITLES: Cover them! (tape a bit of paper to the screen). At first you may lack the courage, but at least do it for a while. Watch, rewind, watch again (some brief segments at least!).
  • NO VCR? NO PROBLEM: the School’s Language Centre is setting up VCR/monitor posts for students.
  • Italian TV programs may be received directly from Italy by satellite with a suitable dish or subscribing to Optus cable TV or Foxtel at a moderate monthly cost.

Radio

AM

  • SBS 1224 kHz (check programme guide)
  • RG 1593 kHz RETE ITALIA

FM

  • ZZZ 92.3 MHz MULTICULTURAL RADIO (Italian programme times vary)
  • SBS 93.1 Mhz (Italian: 8.00am to 9.00 am and 6.00pm to 7.00pm Monday to Sunday)

Print

  • The School Library has copies of magazines and newspapers, as well as books and dictionaries.
  • Main Library – check ItalyItalian on the electronic catalogues.

Audio tapes

  • The language Centre has multiple copies of some language courses. Tapes relating to some language courses may be available from the General Office – check with your unit coordinator.

 

Scholarships

The Joseph Gioscio Italian Scholarship is offered to a third or fourth year student of Italian wishing to proceed to higher studies. The Joseph Gioscio Scholarship Fund was established to honour the memory of Joseph Gioscio who introduced and developed Italian at Monash University and recognizes his commitment to academic excellence.

The Colin McCormick Prize in Italian is awarded by the Dante Alighieri Society annually to a deserving first-year student of Italian at Monash University.