Seminar by Mirna Cicioni on Primo Levi

JE_PrimoLevi2-853x1024‘Dirty Secrets’? Primo Levi and the Resistance, April 2, 6.30pm Italian Institute of Culture, Dr Mirna Cicioni, April 2, 6.30pm, Italian Institute of Culture Melbourne, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra.

Abstract

It is well known that Primo Levi was deported to Auschwitz as a Jew, but was arrested (on 9 December 1943) as a member of one of the first Resistance units in the Val d’Aosta. I look at some debates which took place in Italy in early 2013, after the publication of two books whose main focus is a ‘dirty secret’ of Levi’s partisan unit: the trial and execution of two young members of the unit. My discussion is mainly in the context of Levi’s work, but it also touches on other literary accounts of “partisan summary justice” and on what the British historian John Foot calls Italy’s “divided memory”, namely the tendency for conflicting narratives (personal, public, cultural) to emerge from crucial moments of Italian history.

 

Mirna Cicioni has taught Italian at La Trobe and Monash. She has published widely on Primo Levi and other post-WWII Italian Jewish writers. She is currently working as a freelance community interpreter, but hasn’t stopped reading and writing. For catering purposes please, please book sending an email to bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it

Free event.

The seminar is presented by RISM.

 

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Italian Consul General Marco Maria Cerbo visits the Italian Studies program at Monash (April 9)

Console Monash 1Italian Consul General in Melbourne Marco Maria Cerbo visits the Italian Studies program at Monash.

Consul General Marco Maria Cerbo, who has recently taken his position in Melbourne, was invited by the Italian Studies co-ordinator Dr Patrizia Sambuco to meet staff and students of the Italian Studies program at Clayton. It was an opportunity for the Consul to get to know the work done in Italian Studies and in the Arts Faculty at Monash and for the students to listen to his view on the role of Italy in the world. The event was attended by students and staff of Italian Studies, the Dean of the Faculty of Arts Professor Rae Frances and the Head of the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Associate Professor Rita Wilson.

As a tribute to the Consul and to Italian culture, two students of Italian, Lisa Parker and Peter Sergi, beautifully performed two opera arias in Italian. Italian opera and culture were not the only elements touched to discuss the role of Italy in the world.

In a dynamic exchange with students, Consul Cerbo revealed a number of Italian inventions that are used by everyone in our daily life. It was surprising to know that objects such as the plastic bottle cap that we use every day is an Italian invention, not to mention that high-heeled shoes were for the first time created in Italy during the Renaissance. Students and staff had also the opportunity to ask the Consul about his work, the role of Consulates, and about his initiatives for closer relationships between Italy and Australia.

The event was inspiring and much appreciated by all people involved.

 

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‘Gestualista’ Luca Vullo at Monash (April 4)

Luca Vullo met students of Italian Studies to talk about his documentary La voce del corpo and to work with them in a series of role-plays centred on the relevance of body language in Italy and in particular in Sicily.

IMG_0618-2

 

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Seminar by Dr Mirna Cicioni on Primo Levi (Wednesday April 2)

JE_PrimoLevi2-853x1024 Research in Italian Studies in Melbourne (RISM) is pleased to invite you to a seminar by

Dr Mirna Cicioni

on

‘Dirty Secrets’? Primo Levi and the Resistance April 2, 6.30pm Italian Institute of Culture, Melbourne 233 Domain Rd,

South Yarra

Abstract

It is well known that Primo Levi was deported to Auschwitz as a Jew, but was arrested (on 9 December 1943) as a member of one of the first Resistance units in the Val d’Aosta. I look at some debates which took place in Italy in early 2013, after the publication of two books whose main focus is a ‘dirty secret’ of Levi’s partisan unit: the trial and execution of two young members of the unit. My discussion is mainly in the context of Levi’s work, but it also touches on other literary accounts of “partisan summary justice” and on what the British historian John Foot calls Italy’s “divided memory”, namely the tendency for conflicting narratives (personal, public, cultural) to emerge from crucial moments of Italian history.

 

Mirna Cicioni has taught Italian at La Trobe and Monash. She has published widely on Primo Levi and other post-WWII Italian Jewish writers. She is currently working as a freelance community interpreter, but hasn’t stopped reading and writing. For catering purposes please, please book sending an email to bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it Free event RISM is an initiative of the Italian Studies

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Italian travel scholarship applications closing soon

vcdonors-1-199x300
Top L-R: Professor John Nieuwenhuysen and Professor Ed Byrne, President and Vice-Chancellor, Monash University
Bottom L-R: The Hon Sir James Gobbo AC CVO and Mr Vincent Volpe AM, President, Italian Services Institute

What is the Italian Service Institute Travel Scholarship?

The Italian Service Institute was established to provide education and welfare services to disadvantaged persons of Italian descent who are Australian residents and who would otherwise not have access to such services.

As a part of this service, the Institute is now proud to offer travel scholarships to Italy to support disadvantaged Monash students of Italian descent in Australia to study at the Monash Prato Centre or another university institution in Italy.

The travel scholarship on offer is to the value of $3,000 to support students with study and to provide them with a cultural experience in Italy.

It is anticipated that the first scholarship recipients will be awarded for courses and travel in 2014.

Am I eligible to apply?

Studying in Italy will allow you to gain valuable international experience and enrich your understanding and connection to your Italian cultural heritage. In this regard, it is essential that you have a strong desire to travel and study in Italy when making your application for the Italian Services Institute Travel Scholarship.

To apply, you must be a Monash student of Italian descent who would otherwise find it difficult to finance study in Italy.

You must also meet the following criteria:

  • Current enrolment at a Monash campus in Australia
  • Be approved by Faculty and Monash Study Abroad to undertake a credit bearing overseas study program at the Monash Prato Centre or other university institution
  • Be experiencing financial hardship

Scholarships will be awarded to eligible students based on financial needs, and on merit and academic performance.

Application details

Hurry, applications close October 31, 2013!

To apply visit https://applicant.connect.monash.edu.au/connect/webconnect

For more information on this scholarship and application process or visit http://www.monash.edu.au/students/scholarships/italian-travel-bursary.html

Prato information session

You may also like to attend a Prato Information Session scheduled for Monday, 28th October in R1, Building 8 at Clayton at 1-2.30 pm

Find out more:

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Public Lecture by Prof Martin McLaughlin (University of Oxford), Tuesday October 1

‘Calvino, Eco and the transforming power of world literature’, Prof Martin McLaughlin (University of Oxford), Tuesday October 1, 5.30pm, Monash Caulfield Campus S/S230. (See campus map: http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/maps/2-Caulfieldcolour.pdf)

Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco wrote many essays on world literature, so much so that they would both have been major literary critics even if they had not written any novels.  Both authors were also influenced by many non-Italian writers in their creative works.  However, the way they interpreted and were inspired by texts from other literatures was different.  This seminar seeks to compare these two major Italian writers in terms of both their criticism of world literature and the different ways their fiction was transformed by it.  What emerges is Eco’s privileging of medieval texts as opposed to Calvino’s love for Ariosto, and in the modern era their differing reactions to major figures such as Joyce and Borges.  What they have in common is their capacity to draw creative inspiration even from texts that are very remote from their own poetics.

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Public Lecture by Martin McLaughlin (University of Oxford)

‘Calvino, Eco and the transforming power of world literature’, Prof Martin McLaughlin (University of Oxford), Tuesday October 1, 5.30pm, Monash Caulfield Campus S/S230. (See campus map: http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/maps/2-Caulfieldcolour.pdf)

Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco wrote many essays on world literature, so much so that they would both have been major literary critics even if they had not written any novels.  Both authors were also influenced by many non-Italian writers in their creative works.  However, the way they interpreted and were inspired by texts from other literatures was different.  This seminar seeks to compare these two major Italian writers in terms of both their criticism of world literature and the different ways their fiction was transformed by it.  What emerges is Eco’s privileging of medieval texts as opposed to Calvino’s love for Ariosto, and in the modern era their differing reactions to major figures such as Joyce and Borges.  What they have in common is their capacity to draw creative inspiration even from texts that are very remote from their own poetics.

This event is presented by RISM.

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Seminar by Peter Howard (Monash University)

‘Charting Cultural Transformation through Renaissance Preaching’, A/Prof Peter Howard (Monash University), Monday September 2, 6pm, Italian Institute of Culture, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra

How did the artists of the Sistine Chapel wall frescoes develop and execute a complex programme in an amazingly short period of time? How do we explain the configuration of public space in early Renaissance Italy? Who authorized the magnificent display that characterizes Renaissance Florence? These are just some of the questions on which light is shed if an expansive role is assigned to preaching in late medieval and early renaissance Italy. This argument is a reversal of the image of the mendicant “penitential preachers” that Burckhardt constructed a century and a half ago but that still prevails, even among some scholars. Most commonly, the historiography identifies the humanists as the innovators of the day and as the disseminators of a renewed classical culture. This can be overemphasized. I argue that evidence suggests that a traditional medium such as the sermon was just as, if not more, responsible for a new historical and social vocabulary which equipped Florentines in particular to meet the demands of a rapidly changing society.

This event is presented by RISM.

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Seminar by Andrea Rizzi (University of Melbourne)

‘Authority and Translation in Early Renaissance Italy’, Dr Andrea Rizzi (University of Melbourne), August 7 2013, 5.30, Italian Institute of Culture, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra

In ancient Rome, translation between languages was always free and aggressive. It was only with the translation of the Bible into Latin that the notion of faithful translation was introduced. Fifteenth-century Italian translators went back to the ancient Roman understanding of translation as aggressive appropriation of the source text and culture. As a result, early Renaissance translators such as Bruni, Poliziano and Filelfo saw translation as an opportunity to displace the Greek culture that was being rediscovered while at the same time imitating and surpassing the Latin culture of antiquity. Through an analysis of translators’ prefaces, this paper shows that Italian Renaissance scholars rewrote and displaced classical and medieval texts and effectively became the new authors of their past culture.

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Seminar by Sabina Sestigiani (Swinburne University)

‘Leonardo Sciascia & Peter Robb: a discordant view on the anti-mafia pool in Palermo in the 1980s’, Dr Sabina Sestigiani (Swinburne University), June 9 2013, 5.30, Italian Institute of Culture, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra

This seminar analyses Leonardo Sciascia’s sceptical opinions in regard to the anti-mafia pool in Palermo in the 1980s and Peter Robb’s portrayal of the mafia and anti-mafia phenomenon in his Midnight in Sicily. Sciascia’s famous article “I professionisti dell’antimafia” published in the Italian daily Il Corriere della sera in 1987, and the sensation it caused in Italy will be discussed. The seminar revisits Sciascia’s controversial article through Robb’s critical analysis of Sciascia and his fierce attack on the anti-mafia movement of the 1980s. 

This event is presented by RISM.

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Seminar by Brigid Maher (La Trobe University)

“From one moment to the next we are no longer ourselves” The 1980s as a decade of transformation in Nicola Lagioia’s Riportando tutto a casa, Brigid Maher (La Trobe University), April 30 2013, 5.30pm, Italian Institute of Culture, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra

 The 1980s brought considerable change to Italy: greater affluence in some sectors of society, the advent of commercial television, increased globalization and Americanization, and some significant technological developments. In this talk I will explore how these different kinds of transformation are portrayed and critiqued in Nicola Lagioia’s 2011 novel Riportando tutto a casa. Starting out with the arrival in Italian homes of the television comedy show Drive In (“the laughter that was to bury us all”), the novel depicts the period as one of both personal transformation – these are the narrator’s formative years – and societal transformation, as new sources of wealth and status coalesce with historically rooted phenomena such as a culture of favours and the problem of organized crime. I will also touch upon some of the challenges that come up in translating this cultural and historical milieu into English.

This event is presented by RISM.

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Seminar by Susanna Scarparo (Monash University)

‘Reconfiguring the Mother–Daughter Relationship in Francesca Comencini’s Lo spazio bianco, A/Prof. Susanna Scarparo, December 7 2012, 5.30pm, Italian Institute of Culture, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra

 In this seminar, Susanna Scarparo discusses ways in which Francesca Comencini’s Lo spazio bianco shifts the attention from the institution of motherhood and mother–daughter relationships to the complex and intimate account of the experience of bringing a daughter into this world from a mother’s point of view.

This event is presented by RISM.

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Seminar by Bruno Mascitelli (Swinburne University)

‘Italy: The illusive chase to further political transition amidst political and economic crisis’, Dr Bruno Mascitelli (Swinburne University), November 20 2012, 5.30, Italian Institute of Culture, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra  

 Dr Mascitelli’s presentation will first consider that Italy since the political crisis of the early 1990s and the political period of transition of the “Second Republic” has been defined by its stumbling from one crisis to the next, with parties and governments incapable and unwilling to forego their self-interest and govern across special interest groups. Dr Mascitelli will then examine the reasons why the political transformation never occurred and why it could not.

This event is presented by RISM.

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Seminar by Peter Howard (September 2)

 

 

RISM 

 and the Italian Cultural Institute

 have great pleasure in inviting you to a talk in English on

  

images-17Charting Cultural Transformation through Renaissance Preaching

by

A/Prof Peter Howard (Monash University)

 

Monday 2 September at 6pm

Italian Cultural Institute

233 Domain Road

South Yarra

 

 

How did the artists of the Sistine Chapel wall frescoes develop and execute a complex programme in an amazingly short period of time? How do we explain the configuration of public space in early Renaissance Italy? Who authorized the magnificent display that characterizes Renaissance Florence? These are just some of the questions on which light is shed if an expansive role is assigned to preaching in late medieval and early renaissance Italy. This argument is a reversal of the image of the mendicant “penitential preachers” that Burckhardt constructed a century and a half ago but that still prevails, even among some scholars. Most commonly, the historiography identifies the humanists as the innovators of the day and as the disseminators of a renewed classical culture. This can be overemphasized. I argue that evidence suggests that a traditional medium such as the sermon was just as, if not more, responsible for a new historical and social vocabulary which equipped Florentines in particular to meet the demands of a rapidly changing society.

 For catering purposes please book at bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it

Tel. 03 – 9866 5931

For more information on RISM please contact Dr Patrizia Sambuco (Monash University): patrizia.sambuco@monash.edu

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Seminar on Authority and Translation in Early Renaissance Italy

image_preview

RISM  

 and the Italian Cultural Institute

have great pleasure in inviting you to a talk in English on

 Authority and Translation in Early Renaissance Italy

by

Andrea Rizzi (University of Melbourne)

Wednesday 7 August at 5.30pm

Italian Cultural Institute

233 Domain Road

South Yarra

In ancient Rome, translation between languages was always free and aggressive. It was only with the translation of the Bible into Latin that the notion of faithful translation was introduced. Fifteenth-century Italian translators went back to the ancient Roman understanding of translation as aggressive appropriation of the source text and culture. As a result, early Renaissance translators such as Bruni, Poliziano and Filelfo saw translation as an opportunity to displace the Greek culture that was being rediscovered while at the same time imitating and surpassing the Latin culture of antiquity. Through an analysis of translators’ prefaces, this paper shows that Italian Renaissance scholars rewrote and displaced classical and medieval texts and effectively became the new authors of their past culture.

 Please note: Cinema passes for the next Lavazza Italian Film Festival will be drawnfor ICI Members who attend this event.

 Free event

 For catering purposes please book at bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it

Tel. 03 – 9866 5931

 For more information on RISM please contact Dr Patrizia Sambuco (Monash University): patrizia.sambuco@monash.edu 

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Seminar by Dr Sabina Sestigiani

 

falcone_borsellino.jpg

RISM (Research in Italian Studies at Melbourne) and the Italian Cultural Institute

  have great pleasure in inviting you to a talk in English on

 Leonardo Sciascia and Peter Robb: a discordant view

on the anti-mafia pool in Palermo in the 1980s

Monday 17 June at 5.30pm

Italian Cultural Institute

233 Domain Road

South Yarra

 In this seminar Dr Sabina Sestigiani (Swinburne University) will analyse Leonardo Sciascia’s sceptical opinions in regard to the anti-mafia pool in Palermo in the 1980s and Peter Robb’s portrayal of the mafia and anti-mafia phenomenon in his book Midnight in Sicily.

Dr Sestigiani will discuss the sensation caused in Italy by  Sciascia’s famous article “I professionisti dell’antimafia“, published in the Italian daily Il Corriere della Sera in 1987.

 Please note: Cinema passes for the next Lavazza Italian Film Festival will be drawn

for ICI Members who attend this event.

 Free event

 For catering purposes please book at bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it

Tel. 03 – 9866 5931

For more information on RISM please contact Dr Patrizia Sambuco (Monash University): patrizia.sambuco@monash.edu

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Research

Italian Studies staff works within the LCL School’s dynamic research areas, and are therefore able to supervise and co-supervise MA and PhD projects both within and outside their own program.  The principal affiliation is with RISL.

We welcome applications from prospective PhD students wishing to conduct research within the areas of expertise of our staff. The research strength and supervision areas of the Italian Studies staff are:

 

  • Cinema and theatre
  • Cultural and literary studies
  • Gender and feminist theories
  • Translation studies
  • Transcultural studies
  • Women writers

 

If you intend to work on a project that encompasses Italian Studies and another discipline, we will organize the necessary complement research expertise to meet your supervision needs.

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Italian Studies (by research)

Areas: Italian literary, cultural and cinema studies. Intercultural and migration studies. Italian history. Translation studies. Joint supervision with other schools in the Faculty is also possible. The thesis topic must be determined in consultation with the supervisor, who is to be selected in consultation with the graduate coordinator. Detailed information about staff’s research interests and expertise can be found in their individual staff profiles.

Thesis length: 80,000 – 100,000 words

Candidature: Three years full-time or six years part-time

Prospective research students should refer to How to Apply. The first step is to complete the on-line Pre-Application Form.

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