International Studies Programme

International Studies is one of the most popular areas of study in the Faculty of Arts. Its strength lies in the fact that it is taught across multiple disciplines, allowing students to consider the most pressing issues facing the world today from a range of perspectives. The disciplinary perspectives that inform International Studies include Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Drama and Theatre Studies, Film and Television Studies, Geography, History, Literature, Philosophy, and Politics.

Please visit our programme structure page for a full list of International Studies Units and Electives.

By engaging in a cross-displinary inquiry of contemporary world issues, you will gain:

  • a knowledge of modern world history and politics
  • a grounding in current affairs and debates about the future
  • an understanding of who we are and how we got here.
  • high level skills in oral and written communication of complex ideas
  • analytical and problem-solving abilities
  • empathy and active engagement with alternative cultural contexts
  • experience in conducting research and writing, including the ability to locate, handle and synthesize large amounts of information
  • independence of mind, self-discipline and self-direction to work effectively under own initiative

For details on some of our former students, see the bottom of this page.  Students interested in International Studies should also consider the Bachelor of Arts (Global), which is organised around a required study abroad component.

First-year International Studies Units

The following two units make up a first-year sequence:

  • Contemporary Worlds 1 (Semester 1) ATS1325
  • Contemporary Worlds 2 (Semester 2) ATS1326

Second and third-year International Studies units

A range of units are available at 2nd and 3rd year level for students choosing to progress to a major (8 units – 48 points) or minor (4 units – 24 points) in International Studies after completing Contemporary Worlds 1 and 2. Second and third-year units are taught by a range of schools in the faculty, creating a challenging cross-disciplinary curriculum for students. Detailed unit descriptions are available in the online handbook:

Second and Third year units are taught by a range of schools in the faculty, creating a challenging cross-disciplinary curriculum for students.

Units Taught by the School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies

Units Taught by the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics

  • Global cultures, local traditions: creating and consuming (popular) culture (ATS2627/ATS3627)

Units Taught by the School of Political and Social Inquiry

Units Taught by the School of Geography and Environmental Science

  • Power and poverty: International development in a globalised world (ATS2628)

Visit the Handbook for detailed information about the International Studies major and minor.

If you have any further questions regarding International Studies, visit our Course Advice page

Studying overseas

Monash encourages its students to take advantage of the opportunity to study abroad at our overseas campuses. The major in International Studies is taught at the Monash South Africa campus and the Sunway campus in Malaysia. Generous travel grants are available to students wishing to study at one of these campuses for a semester. As well as our overseas campuses, Monash has close to 100 exchange agreements with partner universities abroad.

Visit our Monash abroad website for further information.

 

Past Students (Jessie Fisher)

Jessie Fisher, International Studies major, Bachelor of Arts (Global) graduate, 2010

When I began the Bachelor of Arts (Global) I was looking for a degree that would give me the flexibility of an Arts degree as well as push me to explore beyond my comfort zone. The compulsory International Studies major allowed me to take units from across the Arts Faculty, from History and Philosophy to Politics, Anthropology and even Geography and Environmental Science. This structure provided me not only with a wide range of knowledge and research skills, but also demonstrated how issues of globalisation and international development played out within various scholarly fields.

The compulsory exchange program, in which Global students may spend up to three semesters studying overseas, links students with some of the most prestigious universities in the world. In 2010, I undertook the International Studies Honours Program. The skills I developed throughout my Bachelor were extended not only through the development of my own research project culminating in an 18,000 word thesis, but also via the two 12-point Masters units (each with their own opportunity to conduct 6,000 word individual research projects) that make up the Honours year.

The International Studies Honours Program has given me the skills and confidence to undertake high-level graduate positions in Government and the private sector, as well as preparing me for the Master of Arts by Research in several fields including History, Politics and Gender Studies

Further information

Past students (Keshia Jacotine)

Keshia Jacotine, International Studies major, Bachelor of Arts (Global) graduate, 2010

I started at Monash in 2007.  I initially chose the Bachelor of Arts (Global) because I was drawn to the opportunity of going on exchange during my time as an undergraduate. I majored in International Studies and Politics, and I found that these two majors complemented each other and gave my studies a more global focus.

Going on exchange was a fantastic experience, that greatly enriched my undergraduate degree.  While at Sheffield, I developed an interest in British and European politics and was able to explore these interests when I took Global Research in my third year at Monash. Global Research provided me with my first experience of research training. In this unit, you work for a full semester on one research project.  I focused on British identity politics and analysed how the British Labour Party made use the concept of “Britishness” and British identity to appeal to voters.

I went on to complete Honours in Politics and at the end of what was a very challenging yet rewarding year I decided that I wanted to pursue a career in research. After graduating, I have written about my research for Crikey, the ABC and the Australian Institute of International Affairs (AIIA).  My articles addressed such topics as the 2011 Irish elections, devolution in the British political system and the ongoing Eurozone crisis.

I am currently employed as a Student Services Officer at the Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE) at the University of Melbourne. I work with a very diverse student cohort, including many exchange students.  Although I find this work very satisfying, I am also looking forward to continuing the studies I started at Monash.

In 2013, I will be returning to the University of Sheffield to start a MA in Research Methods in Politics, a program that will allow me to continue my research training and to undertake advanced studies in Politics, with a view to progress onto a funded PhD in 2014.

To see Keshia interviewed on SBS World News:
http://www.sbs.com.au/news/video/15510595544/Camerons-dangerous-game

For her most recent ABC piece:
http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/4484336.html

 

Further information

International Studies Honours

Honours Coordinator

Dr. Susie Protschky

Email: susanne.protschky@monash.edu

Areas of Research & Units

As staff member’s interest range widely, the International Studies Honours Program offers supervision in a number of Research areas and students who wish to work on a topic should contact the the Disclipline Coordinator (above) or the Director of International Studies, Associate Professor Seamus O’Hanlon.

International Studies Program – Honours Units

Dissertation (thesis)
Core Units – Students Must Complete the following core unit
  • ATS4810 Global Justice: Civil and Human Rights after 1945 (previously INT4010)
    12 pts, Semester 1
    This unit explores civil and human rights campaigns since 1945. It examines their origins and outcomes, and the ways in which they drew from and contributed to an emerging international framework. Further case studies include women’s rights and sexual liberation, freedom of speech, capital punishment, economic justice and unfair trade. The unit examines the development of global movements and organisations, new technologies and tactics of protest and the formation of virtual communities of activism. It also covers the relationship between universal notions of justice and differences of gender, culture and belief, and potential differences between local and global understandings of ‘rights’.
Suggested Elective Units  Students must choose a further 12 points of study at fourth-year level from the faculty’s offerings and have this choice approved by the Honours coordinator for International Studies. Suggested units are listed below but now all are offered each semester. Students are required to research the appropriate offerings and make a decision appropriately.

Prato Winter Semester Units on offer 2012

  • APG4287 War and peace: Models of conflict resolution
  • APG4286 Final journey: remembering the holocaust

Semester One Units

  • ATS4324 Advanced seminar in international political economy
  • APG4657 Beyond conflict: democracy, electoral management and civil society
  • APG4772 Community development in a globalising world
  • APG4382 Contemporary issues in Asia
  • APG4435 European Union: History, Debates, Politics
  • ATS4293 Genocidal thought
  • APG4331 Islam in Turkey and Indonesia
  • APG4329 Political Islam
  • APG4429 Prosperity, poverty and sustainability in a globalised world
  • APG4627 Research in political ecology
  • APG4283 Sharing prosperity
  • APG4334 Southeast Asian politics
  • APG4332 Strategic studies
  • APG4666 Terrorism, counter-terrorism and intelligence
  • ATS4843 Terrorism, fringe politics and extremist violence
  • ATS4898 The EU and the developing world
  • APG4655 Theories and principles of international crisis management
  • ATS4258 Theorising culture
  • APG4327 Wars of recognition: Terrorism and political violence

Semester Two units

  • APG4436 Comparative regionalism
  • APG4337 Conflict resolution and Islam in the Middle East
  • APG4427 Frontiers in sustainability and environment
  • ATS4290 Holocaust memories: Landscape, mourning, identity
  • APG4335 Interfaith relations in the 21st century
  • APG4656 International crisis management in action
  • APG4385 Investigating other societies: Area studies in Global perspective
  • APG4336 Islam and modernity
  • ATS4843 Terrorism, fringe politics and extremist violence
  • APG4327 Wars of recognition: Terrorism and political violence

The Honours Program involves intensive advanced study combining coursework with a research project, or dissertation, in which the student engages in independent research on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

For many students honours provides a stimulating and satisfying completion to their undergraduate work and for others it also offers a gateway to postgraduate research since the entry requirement for research degrees usually involves honours study to a specific level.

A regular general Seminar involves all students undertaking honours and provides a forum to support students as they progress through their dissertation work. This seminar is run by the School Honours Coordinator, whose specific responsibility is to guide honours students through the year from their initial application to the submission of their dissertation.

Combined Honours

This Program offers the opportunity for students to undertake 4th year honours courses which can combine study with other disciplines in our School and Faculty with permission & advice from the Honours Coordinator.

Awards

Prizes are offered for the best thesis in International Studies and for the best overall grade in International Studies for the Honours year. Each prize is worth $500.

Contact Us

Please note that Dr Beatrice Trefalt is acting coordinator of International Studies until June 30, 2014.

Director and Discipline Coordinator

Dr. Julie Kalman
Phone: 03 9905 2161
Email: Julie.Kalman@monash.edu
Location: 6th Floor, West  Menzies Building

Course Advice

Undergraduate Enquiries:
View online answers and submit an enquiry with ask.monash
Telephone: +61 3 9902 6011
Fax: +61 3 9905 2120

Office Location and Opening Hours

Location: First Floor, West Wing, Building 11, Clayton Campus

Standard Office Hours

9.00am – 5.00pm Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday

11.00am – 5.00pm Tuesday

First Two Weeks of Semester

9.00am – 6.00pm Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday

11.00am – 6.00pm Tuesday

Course Advice Appointment Times
(for undergraduate students only)

Postal Address

Arts Student Services
Faculty of Arts
Monash University
Clayton, Victoria 3800
Australia

International Studies Programme – Staff

Director of International Studies Program

Please note that Dr Beatrice Trefalt is acting coordinator of International Studies until June 30, 2014.

  • Dr Julie Kalman, Senior Lecturer in History & Director of International Studies

Teaching Staff in SOPHIS

Staff in other academic units

Course Advise

 

Contemporary Worlds (First year International Studies)

These units are designed to give you the historical background and conceptual tools to understand the contemporary world that we live in today. In them, we examine the ideas and events that shaped the twentieth century and survey a range of issues facing the global in the current millennium.

In first semester, we focus on key political, economic and social developments in the post-war world, examining among other topics the division of the Korean peninsula into two hostile states, the collapse of European empire, the rise of first Japan and then China as economic superpowers, the role of oil in global development, the influence of political Islam and the Cold War.

In second semester, we shift our attention to current problems with a particular focus on globalisation and its economic, cultural, and political implications. In addition to exploring the ways in which globalisation has remade the world, we consider its impact on the environment, terrorism, migration and international crime. The last part of the unit is devoted to exploring the backlash against globalization, which has seen increasing resistance to the idea of global trade as a universal benefit. The following two units make up a first-year sequence:

Contemporary Worlds 1 (Semester 1) ATS1325

This unit is designed to give you the historical background and conceptual tools to understand the contemporary world. It traces the key political, economic, and social developments since 1945 that have brought us to where we are today.

Contemporary Worlds 2 (Semester 2) ATS1326

This unit introduces you to globalisation and its economic, cultural, and political implications. It includes a close study of the impact of globalisation on four key areas: the movement of people, the environment, terrorism, and gender.

First-year International Studies Units

These units are designed to give you the historical background and conceptual tools to understand the contemporary world. In them, we examine the ideas and events that shaped the twentieth century and survey the issues facing the world today.

In first semester, we focus on key political, economic and social developments in the post-war world, examining among other topics the division of the Korean peninsula into two hostile states, the collapse of European empire, the rise of first Japan and then China as economic superpowers, the role of oil in global development, the influence of political Islam and the Cold War.

In second semester, we shift our attention to current problems with a particular focus on globalisation and its economic, cultural, and political implications. In addition to exploring the ways in which globalisation has remade the world, we consider its impact on the environment, terrorism, migration and international crime. The last part of the unit is devoted to exploring the backlash against globalization, which has seen increasing resistance to the idea of global trade as a universal benefit.

The following two units make up a first-year sequence:

  • Contemporary Worlds 1 (Semester 1) ATS1325
  • Contemporary Worlds 2 (Semester 2) ATS1326

Further information

Second and third-year International Studies units

A range of units are available at 2nd and 3rd year level for students choosing to progress to a major (8 units – 48 points) or minor (4 units – 24 points) in International Studies after completing Contemporary Worlds 1 and 2. Second and third-year units are taught by a range of schools in the faculty, creating a challenging cross-disciplinary curriculum for students. Detailed unit descriptions are available in the online handbook:

Second and Third year units are taught by a range of schools in the faculty, creating a challenging cross-disciplinary curriculum for students.

Units Taught by the School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies

Units Taught by the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics

  • Global cultures, local traditions: creating and consuming (popular) culture (ATS2627/ATS3627)

Units Taught by the Schol of Political and Social Inquiry

Units Taught by the School of Geography and Environmental Science

  • Power and poverty: International development in a globalised world (ATS2628)

Visit the Handbook for detailed information about the International Studies major and minor.

If you have any further questions regarding International Studies, visit our Course Advice page

If you are interested, there is the Bachelor of Arts (Global).

Further information

What is International Studies?

The International Studies Program gives you the opportunity to explore the past, present and future contours of the globalised world that we live in today.  It seeks to create global citizens capable of actively engaging with a range of societies and cultures.

 

International Studies is one of the most popular areas of study in the Faculty of Arts. Its strength lies in the fact that it is taught across multiple disciplines, allowing students to consider the most pressing issues facing the world today from a range of perspectives. It includes units that are taught by the School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies; the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics; the School of Political and Social Inquiry and the School of Geography and Environmental Science