PhD in Indonesian

Doctor of Philosophy

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is undertaken by thesis (100% research). It enables students to undertake substantial, original research which is conducted under expert academic supervision and declared to be a significant contribution to knowledge.

The School currently offers to PhD candidates in Indonesian Studies supervision in the following areas:

  • performing arts of Bali (and Java)
  • violence and conflict in Indonesia
  • contemporary Indonesian society and culture

More detailed information about staff’s research interests and expertise can be found in their individual staff profiles.

The degree is normally completed in three years of full-time study, with a maximum candidature of four years of full-time, or eight years of part-time study. The thesis is a maximum of 100,000 words in length (excluding bibliographies, footnotes, indices, etc.). A limited number of external PhD places is available. Details of entry requirements, can be found in the Monash University Postgraduate Handbook.

Prospective research students should refer to How to Apply. The first step is to complete the on-line Pre-Application Form.

Other Possibilities

The Master of Asian Studies, the Master of Arts in Asian Studies by Research and Coursework, the Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies, and the Graduate Diploma of Languages also offer many challenging possibilities. Please refer to the School’s Postgraduate/graduate Coursework and Graduate Studies (Research) pages for details.

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  • Masters of Indonesian

    Master of Arts in Indonesian Studies Course code: 2695 (100% thesis) Coordinator: TBA Candidates undertaking…

  • Honours Programme

    Overview of Honours in Indonesian Studies Eligibility Structure of the program Scholarships Life after Honours…

Key Research and Graduate Research Areas in Indonesian Studies

The research strengths of this program are represented below. We welcome applications from prospective PhD and MA students wishing to conduct research on or related to the following key areas.

Indonesian and Javanese Linguistics (Yacinta Kurniasih)
Indonesian and Javanese Education (Yacinta Kurniasih)
Indonesian gender studies (Barbara Hatley)
Indonesian modern literature (Barbara Hatley)
Indonesian performing arts (Barbara Hatley)
Translation and Interpreting History (Paul Thomas)
Translation in Journalism (Paul Thomas)

Please note that LCL academics frequently co-supervise MA and PhD projects located in programs other than their own. If you intend to work on a project that straddles this and another discipline, we will organize the necessary complement of research expertise to meet your supervision needs.

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Masters of Indonesian

Master of Arts in Indonesian Studies

Course code: 2695 (100% thesis)
Coordinator: TBA

Candidates undertaking the degree are expected to submit a thesis of 30,000-40,000 words. The period of candidature is two years full-time or four years part-time.

The thesis topic must be determined in consultation with the supervisor, who is to be selected in consultation with the graduate coordinator.

Detailed information about staff’s research interests and expertise can be found in their individual staff profiles .

Applicants for this program are required to submit a 1000-word research proposal and are accepted into this program subject to there being a suitable member of staff willing to supervise the proposed research. Previous study of an Asian language at university level is normally assumed.

Prospective research students should refer to How to Apply. The first step is to complete the on-line Pre-Application Form.

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  • PhD in Indonesian

    Doctor of Philosophy The degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is undertaken by thesis (100%…

  • Honours Programme

    Overview of Honours in Indonesian Studies Eligibility Structure of the program Scholarships Life after Honours…

Indonesian Studies Staff

Academic Staff in Indonesian Studies

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First Year Indonesian Enrolment and Placement Interviews

The Indonesian Studies Program conducts placement interviews for all students who have had previous experience studying Indonesian or Malay, including students whose first language is Indonesian or Malay. Based on these interviews you will be placed in the appropriate level for your language and learning background.

If you have no previous experience studying Indonesian or Malay you can enrol directly in Indonesian 1 (ATS1111) and do not require a placement interview.

Students with previous experience in Indonesian or Malay may enrol in an Indonesian language unit but these enrolments will be considered provisional until students have completed the placement interview.

Placement Interviews

To find out more or book an interview, contact:

Provisional Entry Points for Indonesian at Monash University

The following information should be seen as a guide only, but can be used for provisional enrolment. Your precise entry point will be determined by the placement interviews.

Language and Culture Units

First Semester Units Second Semester Units
Unit Name
Indonesian 1

Student Entry for:
Beginners, little or no knowledge of Indonesian.

Unit Name
Indonesian 2

Student Entry for:
Students with year 10 Indonesian or equivalent, Post VCE students who have had some absence from Indonesian study.

Unit Name
Indonesian 3

Student Entry for:
Intermediate level students with VCE Indonesian or equivalent, Background speakers e.g. Australian Indonesians/Malays, Singaporean Malays, East Timorese

Unit Name
Indonesian 4

Student Entry for:
Upper intermediate level students with VCE Indonesian or equivalent, Background speakers e.g. Australian Indonesians/Malays, Singaporean Malays, East Timorese

Unit Name
Indonesian 5

Student Entry for:
Advanced students with VCE Indonesian or equivalent, Malay speakers from Malaysia, Brunei, East Timor. Indonesians who have spent some time in Australia.

Unit Name
Indonesian 6

Student Entry for:
Malay speakers from Malaysia, Brunei, East Timor. Indonesians who have spent some time in Australia.

Specialist Language and Culture Units

Unit Name
Indonesian for Special Purposes:
Media Massa

Student Entry for:
Indonesians who have completed high school in Indonesia.

Unit Name
Indonesian for Special Purposes:
Seni Drama

Student Entry for:
Indonesians who have completed high school in Indonesia.

Unit Name
Indonesian Special Projects I

Student Entry for:
Indonesians who have completed high school in Indonesia and with at least 2 years tertiary experience.

Unit Name
Indonesian Special Projects II

Student Entry for:
Indonesians who have completed high school in Indonesia and with at least 2 years tertiary experience.

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  • School-wide units

    The School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics expects students majoring in a language to take…

  • Diploma in Languages: Indonesian

    The Diploma in Languages is an undergraduate qualification that permits students from other faculties (Business…

School-wide units

The School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics expects students majoring in a language to take (at least) one school-wide elective as part of their major sequence. The school-wide electives are listed below. Some programs may consider some of these options of particular relevance and will advise students accordingly.

Second and third year options available as school-wide units:

ATS3747 Theory and Research in Asian Studies
ATS2627 /ATS3627 Global Cultures, Local Traditions: Creating and Consuming (Popular) Culture
ATS2622 /ATS3622 Production, Consumerism and the Environment in the Contemporary World
ATS2405 /ATS3405 Introduction to Critical Theory
ATS3816 The Social Context of Language Learning
ATS2678 /ATS3678 Language and Identity
ATS2671 /ATS3671 Managing Intercultural Communication

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Honours Programme

Overview of Honours in Indonesian

The honours program in Indonesian is a full one-year program of study or part-time over two years. Full-time students complete 48 credit points over one year: part-time students do so over two years, with 24 points completed each year.

The program consists of 24 points of coursework and 24 points of research and thesis writing. Students may choose either (i) to do one semester of intensive work in-country, with the rest of the work being done at Monash, or (ii) to do the entire program at Monash.

Combined honours may be taken with another discipline provided that all Honours requirements are met in both disciplines and the program is approved by the head of both schools.

Eligibility

Honours is a competitive and challenging program and only students who have an adequate research proposal and demonstrated ability in previous studies will be accepted. Students must have a major in Indonesian or Indonesian Studies and an average grade of 70 percent or better for four subjects (24 points), consisting of three third-year subjects and one second- or third-year subject.

The Honours program in Indonesian is open to students from other universities. Monash students are highly recommended to complete ATS3747 Theory and Research in Asian Studies or a similar unit in research methodology in their second or third year of study in order to be able to work constructively over the summer period on a literature review on initial research.

Structure of the program

Students enrolled in Honours in Indonesian will normally complete the following coursework:

      • ATS4653 - LCL Honours workshop: theory and method in the humanities (12 points)
        and also
        :
      • Electives (12 points)
        These are generally two language units at the appropriate level, but students with high levels of proficiency in the Indonesian language may opt to do other coursework worth 12 credit points. At the time of application, students should consult with the Honours Coordinator about the level of language study they should undertake.

OR

      • Coursework in Indonesia (up to 24 points)
        Students may arrange to do the coursework component in Indonesia through Monash-UGM Intensive Program (January-February) or ACICIS (The Australian Consortium for In-Country Indonesian Studies).
      • The Indonesian Program has links with several universities in Indonesia such as Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta University, University of Padjajaran, Muhammadiyah University Malang, and Indonesian Arts Institute (Institut Seni Indonesia, Yogyakarta). Honours students may study at one of these universities, usually through the ACICIS program.
      • There are some scholarships to support that study and a range of options exist. Students should consult with Ms Yacinta Kurniasih, the Coordinator of Indonesian Language Study Abroad Program (Yacinta.Kurniasih@monash.edu).

The Research-Thesis Component

The thesis should present original research which examines issues relevant to understanding contemporary Indonesian, to the Indonesian language or to Indonesia-Australia relations. Students may also consider doing a thesis in Indonesian translation. For more information on the format of research and translation theses in our School please consult the School Honours page

The Indonesian Studies Program at Monash is staffed by academics with a wide range of research interests. Normally one of those staff will be appointed to supervise (or Co-supervise) the Honours research. A list of staff members and their research interests is given below, and it is expected that students will locate their own supervisor in consultation with the Honours Coordinator.

Current and previous Honours topics:

      1. The contrasting influences of globalization and Islamization on students in the pesantren in Indonesia
      2. Language maintenance of Chinese-Indonesian community in Kalimantan
      3. The way forward for the Indonesian women’s movement in the post Suharto era
      4. Gender, power, development and family planning
      5. Adat law and the land right; a case study in Central Java
      6. Identity, activism and motherhood (joint with School of LLC)
      7. The role of the Indonesian Press during separatist movement
      8. “Rainbow Heart”: a narrative of an NGO for disabled people in Solo, Central Java
      9. Australian and Indonesian media representations of the Refugee and Asylum Seeker Issue in 2001 (with Anthropology Department)
      10. An environmental law and its implementation; a study case in Lampung
      11. Pisau Dengan Dua Sisi: The Effect Of Donor Dependence On Human Rights NGOs In Indonesia”
      12. “Before And After May 1998: Chinese Indonesians And The ‘Imagined Community’”
      13. “Environmnetal law enforcement in Indonesia”
      14. “The Bali Bombing: Jihad, Matyrdom and Islamic Extremism”
      15. “‘Spaces For Representation’: The Struggle For The Streets In Post-New Order Indonesia”
      16. Young Indonesian and their perception about Australia: Inter-cultural Communication
      17. Language maintenance and language Shift in the Indonesian migrant community in Germany
      18. Drug and Alcohol Policy in Indonesia: The zero tolerance approach
      19. SBY: A new era in Political Rhetoric in Indonesia
      20. Regulating Indonesia’s Environment: Enforcement of Criminal Environmental Law within the Context of Illegal Forest Fires
      21. Apotik Komik and Public Art: The Struggle for ‘Democratic Spaces’ in Post-New Order Indonesia

Students are advised to select an area for research and to discuss their vision for the research with the Honours Coordinator and a potential supervisor before the summer break, so that background reading can be started before the first semester begins. Those planning to do research while in Indonesia will need to have a very good outline of their research and a clear plan for obtaining ethical approval before leaving Melbourne.

Scholarships

Please contact Ms Yacinta Kurniasih for information for Honours Indonesian Studies Program, aiming to support a research trip to Indonesia. Refer also to the Monash Scholarships Office for more information. The School also offers travel grants and publication grants to Honours students. Please consult the School Honours page.

Life after Honours

The Honours program is designed to prepare students both for further study and research at the postgraduate level and for employment in areas which involve on-going contact with Indonesian and Indonesian organizations. Many graduates find employment in Indonesia or Australia to be a useful way of extending further the skills and knowledge acquired during the Honours program.

Postgraduate programs offered at Monash which would be of particular interest to graduates with an Honours Degree in Indonesian include the Masters in Applied Linguistics, the Masters in Interpreting and Translation, and the Masters in Asian Studies. Those who do exceptionally well in Honours may qualify to become a PhD candidate pursuing research in many fields of Indonesian studies.

Why do Honours in Indonesian?

      • to extend further one’s knowledge and skills relevant to working in Indonesia or in contact with persons having a Indonesian background;
      • to acquire a four-year degree, with advanced skills in research and report writing, skills which are highly valued in a variety of employment situations;
      • to gain a greater appreciation for Indonesia and a fuller sense of the Indonesian cultural context;
      • to expand expertise in the discipline area in which research is conducted;
      • to gain entry into various postgraduate programs.

Staff in Indonesian Studies and areas in which they supervise

Dr Brett Hough
The performing arts of Bali and Java
Ethnographic film making
Conflcit and violence

Mr Paul Thomas
Journalism in Indonesia.
The history of the Indonesian-Malay language.
Representations of Indonesia/Indonesians in popular culture.
Environmental Tourism in Indonesia
Translation Studies

Ms Yacinta Kurniasih
Indonesian Language & Society
Javanese Language & Society
Gender & Education in Indonesia
Language Education

Adjunct Ass Prof. Stuart Robson (Co-supervisor)
Old Javanese language and literature
Modern Javanese language
Lexicography of Javanese and related languages
Translation (Javanese-English; Dutch-English; Indonesian-English)

Further Information

If you would like specific information on Honours in Indonesian, please contact:

Paul Thomas
Paul.Thomas@monash.edu
Ph: (03) 9905 2243
Fax: (03) 9905 5437

Brett Hough
Brett.Hough@arts.monash.edu.au
Ph: (03) 9905 2962
Fax: (03) 9905 5437

Yacinta Kurniasih
Yacinta.Kurniasih@monash.edu
Ph: (03) 9905 2235
Fax: (03) 9905 5437
School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics

Further information about Honours is available from the School’s Honours page.
For general information on Honours in the Faculty of Arts.

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Diploma in Languages: Indonesian

The Diploma in Languages is an undergraduate qualification that permits students from other faculties (Business and Economics, Science, Engineering, etc.) to complete a language major while completing their primary undergraduate degree. The Diploma can introduce you as a beginner to a new language, or allow you to build on your existing expertise in a language.

By undertaking a Diploma in Languages you will boost your appeal to prospective employers and have the opportunity to pursue your language interests while you are taking you bachelor’s degree in another faculty.

For entry to the Diploma, you must be enrolled in a bachelor’s degree at Monash or another university. Students in double degrees may also apply.

The Diploma in Languages adds an extra major to your main degree. You complete 48 points of study in Arts. It usually takes three to four years to complete, but that time may be reduced if you receive credit for electives already completed.

For more information, consult the School’s Diploma in Languages page, or contact the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics by phone (03 9905-2281) or e-mail.

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Indonesian Studies – Selamat Datang (Welcome)

Since the 1960s Australia has been an important centre for the study of Indonesian language and culture. Indonesian has been popular both in our primary and secondary schools, and at the tertiary level where it is one of the ‘big three’ Asian languages, together with Japanese and Chinese. So why do students choose to study Indonesian? Consider the following:

Strategic Importance

Indonesia is one of the largest and most diverse countries in the world. With over 220 million people and more than eighteen thousand islands linking the Pacific and Indian Oceans it is of great environmental, cultural, political, and economic interest to the countries in the Asia Pacific region.

Communication

While industry and government agencies need to secure thousands of professionals to work across these diverse fields there has been a clear shortage of professionals with the appropriate communications skills in Indonesian. This means that it has often been left up to the Indonesians to acquire the linguistic and cultural knowledge required for an efficient workplace.

Personal Development

Ultimately language study can not just be about the work place, you need to personally engage with a new culture and understand more about your own. Language study therefore is also about the pure enjoyment and inspiration of entering another culture, journeying into someone else’s world. You may explore Indonesia ‘s theatre, literature, music, and cinema or you might like to follow interests in politics and religion.

What Level of Indonesian Should I Enrol In?

The translation and interpreting studies section becomes a member of CIUTI

Monash University’s Translation and Interpreting Studies section scales new heights.

The Translation and Interpreting Studies section is proud to announce they have been accepted as full members of CIUTI (Conférence Internationale d’Instituts Universitaires de Traducteurs et Interprètes), the oldest and most prestigious international association of universities offer­ing degrees in trans­la­tion and inter­pre­ting.
There are only 39 members of CIUTI worldwide and Monash is the only Australian university to have been accepted as a member since the association was established in 1951. CIUTI specialises in promoting the highest standards of training and research in translation and interpretation in tertiary institutions.
The application for membership to CIUTI is rigorous, designed to ensure members share the highest standards in training and research and the whole process takes around 12 months. There are several selection stages, including a site visit by the two CIUTI vice-presidents, and it is testimony to the calibre of our program at Monash that we were unanimously accepted as full members.

Marc Orlando, convener of the Translation and Interpreting Studies Section, says: “We are really delighted, especially after such a lengthy application process. But it was worth it, as we are now part of a network of tertiary institutions that train interpreters and translators at the highest level for several international organisations and this is great in terms of employability of our students. This membership also offers the opportunity to promote mobility of staff and students, and to share research and training practices in T&I Studies. Australia is a key player in T&I training, and this achievement will definitely promote our work at a global level.”

Associate Professor Rita Wilson, Head of the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, says “We couldn’t be happier to receive this international recognition of the quality of our courses. It is also extremely timely because we have just received approval from the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) to include a specialist stream on conference interpreting in the Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies. This means that, in addition to accreditation at the professional level for translation and/or interpreting, the course will provide the opportunity for students to be trained and receive accreditation at the higher (conference interpreter) level and this, in turn, will enhance their employability prospects both nationally and internationally.”

For  more information please see the CIUTI Website.

New Joint Award PhD Program Between Monash Arts and a Prestigious European University

A project originally initiated through the German Program of the Faculty of Arts at Monash has finally come to fruition, following the recent signing of an agreement on the establishment of a Joint Award PhD Program between Monash Arts and Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Philosophy and Humanities.

Established in 1948 to promote intellectual freedom in post-war Europe, Freie Universität Berlin is one of the leading and most prestigious research universities in Germany with strengths focused on the humanities and social sciences.  Its performance is ranked in the top 50 (2012 – 29th) in the world for Arts and Humanities according to the Times Higher Ed World University Rankings.

The Joint PhD Program with Monash Arts will provide a unique learning experience for candidates in an overseas environment, as well as promote and intensify cooperation between the two institutions.

‘This is an exciting opportunity for students at both universities’, said the Dean of Arts, Professor Rae Frances. ‘They will have the chance of input from leading experts in their field at two of the world’s major research universities. They will also have the opportunity to form international networks with other students and academics, and to experience life in another country.’

Candidates enrolling in the program will benefit from the co-supervision of academics from both institutions, with the thesis to be researched and written at both institutions.  Successful graduates from the program will receive the jointly awarded degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

The signing, which took place in the Goldener Saal (golden hall) of the Praesidium of Freie Universität (the headquarters of the allied forces after WW II) was witnessed by Monash’s Dr Chandani Lokuge currently the Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack Visiting Chair in Australian Studies (summer 2012) at the Freie Universität.

This new program builds on existing partnerships with Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany) and Università di Bologna (Italy) which also provide for joint PhDs.  A further Joint PhD program is in the planning stages with Warwick University (UK).

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