Theories of Punishment and Imprisonment: Current & recent projects

2016-2018 – Marsden Fund grant award, Intolerable Risks.  The search for security in an age of anxietyChief Investigator: Prof John Pratt, Victoria University of Wellington. How we punish offenders has become one of the distinguishing features of democratic society itself. However, current changes in penal law and practice in most of the main English speaking societies reverse some of the most fundamental principles that have come to be associated with this social institution. These can include post-prison detention on completion of sentence instead of release: and the use of penal measures to control movement in public space before a crime has been committed. This project provides a sociological explanation of these profound changes to the penal frameworks of New Zealand and similar societies. 

————————————————————————————————————————-

2012-2017 – European Research Council Subjectivity, Identity and Penal Power: Incarceration in a Global AgeChief Investigator: Prof Mary Bosworth, Oxford University. Taking the prison and the immigration detention centre as sites where local/national and global power intersect, this project will examine theoretically and empirically the ways in which people experience and negotiate such places, paying particular attention to how matters of identity, especially race, gender, national identification and their intersections, shape the experience, meaning and effects of incarceration.  

————————————————————————————————————————-

2012-2017- European Research Council “Incarceration in a Global Age” Chief Investigator: Mary Bosworth, Oxford University. This sub-project to “Subjectivity, Identity and Penal Power: Incarceration in a Global Age” will explore what happens to our understanding of punishment when we place matters of identity and subjectivity at the centre of analysis. It will provide the theoretical framework for the whole project that will be constituted in part by empirical research. Revisiting the canon of texts in punishment and society, theoretical and applied, through the question of identity, it will develop a new, gendered, postcolonial approach to penal power.

————————————————————————————————————————-

2015 – Interdisciplinary Roundtable on Punitiveness in America, funded by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.  David A. Green.