Graduate Research

Human Geography at Monash involves a rich and diverse student cohort of postgraduate students who undertaking innovative and ground-breaking research on a variety of topics. Our students receive committed and expert supervision from leading researchers, and contribute to the vibrant research culture within the discipline and the broader School. Students are trained in critical, analytical thinking and research designs and methods, while also undertaking relevant coursework units. Throughout your candidature, we actively support students in contributing to and participating in relevant conferences, and a range of professional activities.

All Human Geography students have the opportunity to apply for the Richard John Bryant Estate Award of up to $5000*, which is designed to support postgraduate data collection and field work expenses in Southeast Asia and beyond. Dr Richard John Bryant is a part of the Human Geography Alumni. His own PhD work focused on unpacking the maritime fabric of Singapore (1819-1914). Please contact Dr Ruth Lane for further information regarding the application process. 

* This amount is subject to change

If you are interested in exploring opportunities for undertaking PhD studies, then please click here to find out more about the Social and Political Sciences Graduate Program.

A few words from recent PhD students in Human Geography

Ms Tanya Anstey – submission due 2017 

tanya-ansteyBeing able to undertake my PhD in Human Geography at Monash University has been a dream come true for me. The quality and structure of the program lends itself to promoting excellence in research by offering superb mentoring and support to each of its students. My own experience with my supervisors has been wonderful; they have been readily available for meetings, and provided excellent feedback and support during my PhD. My work exploring the power dynamics present in the EIA process and the impacts of these on planning outcomes and communities in rural NSW, Australia has been promoted by my supervisors, resulting in invitations to conferences and seminars to present my work. This support is crucial in building up recognition of my work as I move towards the completion of my PhD and out into the real world looking for work. I would unreservedly recommend completing a PhD in the Human Geography Department at Monash University. 

Dr Peter Boateng – graduated 2016

The Human Geography section at Monash University stood out most to me when I was looking for mentorship and a host for my PhD research project. Not only are the researchers here globally acclaimed in their fields, they are also approachable and eager to engage with students and the community. I received exceptional mentoring to develop and complete my interdisciplinary PhD project which looked at the complex ways by which climate variability, sociology-economic and political changes influenced patterns of land use and land cover changes. 

Development of confidence and communication skills is a vital component of the Human Geography PhD programme at Monash University. I was given several opportunities to communicate and publicise my research findings at seminars, conferences, and guest lectures, and these experiences have prepared me for my career as a research scientist. I would unreservedly recommend the Human Geography PhD programme to anyone interested in a well-structured training in Human Geography research.

Dr Susan van de Meene – graduated 2009

susan-van-de-meeneI really enjoyed undertaking doctoral research in Human Geography at Monash University, an experience that was both challenging and rewarding. Having excellent supervision and support throughout my candidature together with the collegial atmosphere among the other postgraduate students and academics contributed to my positive experience. The PhD candidature enabled independent research within a clearly structured program, which developed my research and communication skills. I was also supported to present my research at conferences and seminars and participate in additional academic activities such as an industry study tour and tutoring undergraduate students. 

My doctoral research in sustainable urban water governance enabled me to engage with other disciplines across the university, such as engineering and physical geographers, which broadened my appreciation of interdisciplinary research and helped to develop my communication skills with researchers of different backgrounds.

Reflecting on my time with the Human Geography section, the excellent research training I received has enabled me to work internationally and contribute to a more sustainable future in many different ways. I would not hesitate to recommend undertaking doctoral research in Human Geography at Monash University.