Diaspora, migration, travel (Movement of people) lectures

1. Diasporas in History: Jews and Armenians

1. Lecture

Introductory lecture outlining the main approaches to the study of migration and diaspora, followed by a closer discussion of two groups of shaped many of the early connections in global history: the Jewish diaspora and the Armeian diaspora.

2. Seminar discussion points

  • What does the term ‘diaspora’ mean, and how significant are the origins of the word for the study of diasporas?
  • How different are the Jewish and Armenian diasporas and what characteristics do they share?
  • How central is trade to the Jewish and Armeinian diaspora communities?

3. Core readings

  • Philip Curtin, ‘Trade Diasporas and Cross-Cultural Trade’ in Curtin, Cross-cultural trade in world history (1984)
  • Robin Cohen, Global Diasporas: An Introduction (1997)

4. Essay questions

  • To what extent did diaspora communities contribute to urban life? Concentrate on one diaspora.
  • To what extent were diasporas global phenomena?

5. Further readings

  • Nicholas Canny, Europeans on the Move: Studies on European Migration, 1500-1800 (1994)
  • Robin Cohen, The Cambridge Survey of World Migration
  • Patrick Manning, Migration in World History (2004)
  • David B Ruderman, Early Modern Jewry: A New Cultural History (2010)

6. Podcasts

TBC

7. External links

  • Jewish People Around the World
  • A history of the Armenian diaspora

2. Sojourners: The Chinese Overseas

1. Lecture

This lecture provides an overview of Chinese migration patters, and the specific nature of the Chinese overseas communities.

2. Seminar discussion

  • How did the Chinese state treat Chinese migrants?
  • What factors drove the Chinese overseas?
  • How did the Chinese migrants contribute to the development of global connections?

3. Core readings

  • Lynn Pan, Sons of the Yellow Emperor: The Story of the Overseas Chinese (1990). (read chapters 1-2 on the years 1500-1800)
  • Wang Gungwu, ‘Merchants without Empire: The Hokkien Sojourning Communities, in Tracy, ed., The Rise of Merchant Empires

4. Essay questions

  • How far is ‘sojourner’ an approriate term for a Chinese migrant?
  • In what ways did the Chinese migrations maintain connections to their homeland?
  • Were connections to the homeland more significant for shaping the Chinese diaspora than their adopted homes?

5. Further readings

  • Peter Borschberg, ‘Ethnicity, Language and Culture in Melaka after the Transition from Portuguese to Dutch Rule (Seventeenth Century)’ in Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society 83.2 (2010): 93-117.
  • Philip Kuhn, Chinese among others
  • Wang Gungwu, The Chinese Overseas: From Earthbound China to the Quest for Autonomy (2000)
  • Bolt, Paul J. Looking to the Diaspora: The Overseas Chinese and China’s Economic Development, 1978-1994. Diaspora: A Journal of Transnational Studies 5. 3 (1996)
  • Ha, Marie-Paule. ‘Cultural Identities in the Chinese Diaspora’ in Mots Pluriels 7 (1998)
  • Barbara Voss, ‘The Archaeology of Overseas Chinese Communities’ World Archaeology 37.3 (2005): 424-439

6. Podcasts

TBC

7. External links

3. The Enforced Movement of People and Slavery

1. Lecture

The lecture will provide a general introduction to the theme of enforced migrations, with a particular focus on slavery.

2. Seminar discussion

  • Should slavery be considered as a form of global ‘connection’?
  • In what ways are Africa and the Americas connected through slavery?

3. Core readings

  • Egerton, Douglas, ‘The transatlantic slave trade and slavery in the America’ in The Atlantic World: a History, 1400 to 1888 (2007)
  • Patrick Manning, Slave Trades, 1500-1800: Globalization of Forced Labour (1996). Volume 15 of An Expanding World, edited by A. J. Russell-Wood. (ed. and introduction).

4. Essay questions

  • How can the history of slavery be integrated into global history?
  • Account for the significance of Africa in the Atlantic World.

5. Further readings

  • Madeleine Dobie, Trading places: colonization and slavery in eighteenth-century French culture (2010)
  • Timothy Lockley, ‘Slavery’ in Encyclopaedia of Social Theory (2005)
  • Patrick Manning, ‘Africa and the African Diaspora: New Directions of Study’; review of Rethinking the African Diaspora: The Making of a Black Atlantic World in the Bight of Benin and Brazil by Kristin Mann et al; The African Diaspora: African Origins and New World Identities by Isidore Okpewho et al. The Journal of African History 44.3(2003): 487-506.

6. Podcasts

  • To be confirmed

7. External links

4. Labour Migration

1. Lecture

This lecture will bring in the perspective of ‘labour’ as a significant element of diaspora and migration. It will seek to compare some of the classic patterns of migration across the Atlantic to Asian patterns of migration, and the significance of the Asian diaspora communities in understanding Africa and the Americas.

2. Seminar discussion

  • Which diasporic ommunities can be characterised as ‘labour diasporas’?
  • When and where did labour become the most significant factor in shaping migration? Why there?
  • How different is the nineteenth century in terms of migration from the early modern period? Why?

3. Core readings

  • Adam McKeown, ‘Global Migration: 1846-1940’, Journal of World History 15.2 (2004)

4. Essay questions

  • How significant is labour for understanding patterns of migration?
  • How did diaspora communities change when labour became the main reason for their existence?
  • Explain the pattern of migration of one significant ‘labour diaspora’.

5. Further readings

  • Frederick Knight, Working the diaspora: the impact of African labor on the Anglo-American world, 1650-1850 (2010)
  • Scott Levi, The Indian Diaspora in Central Asia and its Trade 1550-1900 (2002)

6. Podcasts

TBC

7. External links