Global History Annotated Bibliography

Note: This list is not comprehensive and omits many important works. The categorization of individual articles and books is subjective and is intended simply to guide students through the field

Table of Contents:

Part A: The Theory of Global History

Theme 1: What is Global History

Part B: The Practice of Global History – Nodes of Encounter and Exchange

Theme 2: Oceans
Theme 3: Cities
Theme 4: Empire

Part C: The Practice of Global History – Modes of Encounter and Exchange

Theme 5: Trade and commodities (Movement of goods)
Theme 6: Technology, science, religion, ideology (Movement of ideas)
Theme 7: Diaspora, migration, travel (Movement of people)
Theme 8: Ecology, environment, disease (Movement of biota and microbes)

Part D: Globalizing historical issues

Theme 9: The body
Theme 10: Multinational companies
Theme 11: Maps


Part A: The Theory of Global History

Theme 1: What is Global History

A.

Abu-Lughod, Janet. “The World System in the Thirteenth Century: Dead-End or Precursor?”, in Michael Adas, ed., Islamic and European Expansion: The Forging of a Global Order (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1993): 75-102.

Important reflection on the structure of exchange in a pre-modern multi-centered world. It summarises a great deal of the argument presented in her famous book.

Proposes the existence of a thirteenth-century World System involving a network of trade across the Afro-Eurasian landmass. Conceptualising this global system as overlapping “circuits” of exchange, Abu-Lughod emphasises how the globally integrated network was made of regional and local economic interactions in a multi-centered pre-modern world.

Abu-Lughod, Janet. Before European Hegemony: The World System A.D 1250-1350 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989).

Examines the development of a thirteenth century world system. Built around an “archipelago of towns,” the system was uneven but it was also extensive enough to be truly global. An ambitious attempt to identify global networks in an earlier period.

AHR Conversation: Transnational History,” American Historical Review (December 2006).

Analahin, Andrew J. “”Sino-Pacifica”: Conceptualizing Greater Southeast Asia as a Sub-Arena of World History,” Journal of World History 22.4 (2011): 659-691.

B.

Bairoch, Paul and Kozul-Wright, Richard. “Globalization Myths: Some Historical Reflections on Integration, Industrialization and Growth in the World Economy,” in R. Kozul-Wright and R. Rowthorn eds., Transnational Corporations and the Global Economy (New York: St. Martins, 1998): 37-68

A clear and simple analysis of economic globalization by one of France’s best economic historian.

Bayly, C. A., The Birth of the Modern World 1780-1914 (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2004): Introduction and Ch. 1.

Already a classic, Bayly argues for the age of revolutions as a moment of change in world history.

Bayly, C. A., “Archaic’ and ‘Modern’ Globalization in the Eurasian and African Arena, c. 1750-1850,” in A.G. Hopkins, ed., Globalization in World History (London: Pimlico, 2002).

A very sophisticated and engaging reading. An attempt to present a classification of globalization ‘before globalization’. One of Bayly’s best pieces.

Bentley, Jerry., Shapes of World History in Twentieth-Century Scholarship (American Historical Association, 1996)

A useful overview of world history by the preeminent scholar in the field. Divides scholarship into three groups, philosophers of history, social scientists, and professional historians, and lays out some directions for future study.

Bose, Sugata., A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire (Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA, 2006),

Braudel, Fernand., The Wheels of Commerce (New York: Collins, 1982): 114-37; 581-99.

Essentially concerned with the development of capitalism and why it did not continue to develop outside Europe. A classic text.

Buck, David, “Was It Pluck or Luck that Made the West Grow Rich?” Journal of World History 10.2 (1999): 413–30.

Examines three important books (Landes, Frank and Bin Wong) that each provide differing explanations concerning the so-called rise of the west. Accessible introduction to a key debate

C.

Christian, David, “World History in Context” Journal of World History 14.4 (2003): 437–52.

Intriguing piece that aims to place world history in a much larger context. A good introduction to the work of one of the most important proponents of big history.

Cooper, Frederick, “What is the concept of globalization good for?” African Affairs 100 (2001): 189-213.

Argues that the concept of globalization is inadequate for analysis of African history as it presumes coherence and direction in the establishment of a global economy. The paper calls for a more discerning process of analysis that does not assume universal processes.

Chen, Kuan-Hsing, Asia as Method: Toward Deimperialization (Durham: Duke University Press, 2010).

Clunas, Craig, “Modernity Global and Local: Consumption and the Rise of the West,” American Historical Review, 104.5 (1999): 1497-1511.

Collier, Paul, The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008): Ch. 1: “Falling Behind and Falling Apart.”

A best seller around the world, Collier addresses the issue of poverty in those countries that ‘went wrong’. He uses demography, development theories and reflects on the role of politics.

D.

Davis, N.D., “Decentering History: Local Stories and Cultural Crossings in a Global World,” History and Theory 50 (2011): 188–202.

Dirlik, Arif, “Performing the world: Reality and representation in the making of world histor(ies),” Journal of World History 16 (2005) : 391-410.

F.

Flynn, Dennis and Giraldez, Arturo, “Path Dependence, Time Lags and the Birth of Globalization: a Critique of O’Rourke and Williamson,” European Review of Economic History 8 (2004): 81-108.

Introduction to the work of two important scholars that have dominated the debate about global silver markets. Argues that globalization commenced in 1571 with the establishment of reliable trans-Pacific connections. Suggests that global prices did in fact converge twice in the early modern period—in 1640 and again in 1750.

G.

Geyer, Michael and Bright, Charles, “World History in a Global Age,” American Historical Review 100.4 (1995): 1034-1060.

A short overview of the approaches to global history, and its relevance in the modern, globalised world.

“Global Times and Spaces: On Historicizing the Global,” History Workshop Journal 64 (2007): articles by Driver, Burton, Berg, Subrahmanyan, Boal.

Goldstone, Jack, “Efflorescences and Economic Growth in World History: Rethinking the ‘Rise of the West’ and the Industrial Revolution,” Journal of World History 13 (2002): 323-90.

Explores standard concepts relating to economic expansion and the Western political hegemony (e.g. “modern”, “pre-modern”, etc.), arguing that these overshadow analysis of economic, political, and social differences affecting economic development across the globe.

Gunder Frank, Andre and Gills, Barry, eds., The World System: Five hundred years or five thousand? (London & New York, Routledge, 1993).

Includes wide range of perspectives regarding World Systems Theory, from Wallerstein himself (focused on the development of capitalism) to more revisionist approaches of Gunder Frank (who challenges Wallerstein by using his strict economic criteria to argue for a China-centered world economy), and Abu-Lughod (who sees the trade system across Eurasia from the 13th C as a World System). Overall, the most encompassing text on the theory which, in many forms, has come to dominate how scholars conceptualise global interactions.

Gunder Frank, Andre, ReOrient: Global Economy in the Asian Age (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998).

A famous challenge to Eurocentrism and the traditional conception of early modern global economy, Gunder Frank powerfully argues for the centrality of an Asia-, and particularly China-dominated economic world. Reflecting the twenty-first century relevance of the debate, Gunder Frank views European dominance as a brief period in what was, and is again becoming, an Asia-centric global economic system.

H.

Hopkins, A.G., ed., Globalization in World History (London: Pimlico, 2002).

A central text in many module reading lists, categorises the types and stages of globalisation in world history before the modern period. Using a wide range of geographical areas, approaches globalisation as not only the “rise of the West” but also as a non-Western phenomenon.

I.

Iriye, Akira, “The Internationalization of History,” American Historical Review 94.1 (1989): 1-10.

Provides analysis of historiography as centered on geographical zones and calls for the establishment of closer ties with foreign historical communities that utilises cross-disciplinary approaches. Attests to the interconnectedness of human history. (I feel that this would make a great text for the introductory stages of a Global History course.)

J.

Jones, Eric, The European Miracle: Environments, Economies and Geopolitics in the History of Europe and Asia. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981) [3rd ed. 2003].

Criticized for Eurocentrism, but a foundational text.

K.

Kern, Stephen, The Culture of Time and Space, 1880-1914 (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1983).

(Chapter on Distance.)

L.

Landes, David S., The Wealth and Poverty of Nations (London: Little, Brown and Company, 1998): “Chapter 25: Empire and after.”

A very broad overview of the economic, sociocultural and political legacies of the imperial age. Although Landes’ Eurocentricism has been outmoded by more balanced recent writing, this chapter was chosen as it establishes a useful schema.

Lang, Michael, “Globalization and Its History,” Journal of Modern History 78.4 (2006): 899-only to 914.

A slightly long but very thoughtful analysis of globalisation theories and how (or how not) they help with history. The first part discusses what globalisation might be and the second when it might have started.

Lewis, Martin W., and Wigen, Karen E., The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997)

The most useful text on how scholars have traditionally conceptualised the globe, and new theories on how to approach its study. Offers overviews of central ideas such as Toynbee’s civilizations approach, Wallerstein’s World Systems theory, and other concepts of global connections.

Examines the logic behind standard geographical labels. Defines metageography as the “set of spatial structures through which people order their knowledge of the world” and sets out to deconstruct these. Proposes a new framework, world regions, for dividing the globe.

Lieberman, A. Victor, “Abu-Lughod’s Egalitarian World Order. A Review Article,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 35.3 (1993): 544-550.

M.

Manning, Patrick, “Asia and Europe in the World Economy: Introduction,” The American Historical Review 107.2 (2002): 419-425.

Excellent summary of the work of a group of scholars, most notably Ken Pomeranz, who have combined to push back the timeline of European economic ascendancy past 1800.

Marks, Robert B., The Origins of the Modern World: A Global and Ecological Narrative 2nd ed. (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003).

Tries to construct a non-Eurocentric world history, largely emphasizing economic growth and state power, that challenges ‘rise of the West’ theories. The approach is chronological, so any section is suitable for our purpose. The entire book is 200 pages.

Mazlish, Bruce, “Comparing Global to World History,” Journal of Interdisciplinary History 28 (1998): 385-395.

Mazlish, focusing on the terminology and approaches of the field, proposes a division between global history and world history, the latter being focused on civilizations with global history examining the history of globalization and the development of modern phenomena.

Proposes a sharp division between global history and world history. Argues that world history is focused on civilizations while global history should examine the history of globalization and attempt to trace modern developments back into the past.

McKeown, Adam, “Periodizing Globalization,” History Workshop Journal 63.1 (2007): 218-230.

McKeown, Adam, “What Are the Units of World History?” in A companion to world history, ed. Doughlas Northrop (Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley-Blackwell, 2012)

O.

O’Brien, Patrick, “Historiographical Traditions and Modern Imperatives for the Restoration of Global History,” Journal of Global History 1.1 (2006): 3-39.

A broad introduction on the way in which global history has been done since antiquity and why it was out-of-fashion for most of the 19th and 20th centuries.

The most efficient overview of the historiography and methodology of the global history field. Looks at the two dominant approaches of connections and comparisons, as well as the idea of “centric” histories either supporting or challenging the “rise of the West”, and concludes that the restoration of global history rests its potential to construct negotiable meta-narratives with global perspective.

Owen Flynn, Dennis and Giráldez, Arturo, China and the Birth of Globalization in the 16th Century (Farnham: Ashgate Variorum, 2010).

Osterhammel, Jürgen The Transformation of the World: A History of the 19th Century (New York: Princeton University Press, forthcoming 2012).

[Original title, Jürgen Osterhammel, Die Verwandlung der Welt. Geschichte des 19. Jahrhunderts, Munich, 2009)]

P.

Parthasarathi, Prasannan, “Review Article: The Great Divergence,” Past and Present 176 (2002): 275-293.

Probably the best critique of Pomeranz’s important book. Parthasarathi argues that consumption and technology should be given more space in narratives of divergence.

Parthasarathi, Prasannan, Why Europe grew rich and Asia did not (Cambridge; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011).

Pomeranz, Kenneth, The Great Divergence. China, Europe and the Making of the Modern World Economy (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000).

Dealing with the economic “divergence” between Europe and Asia, Pomeranz argues that this was caused by two factors: coal and colonies. Emphasising continuities as well as change, and on both Asia and Europe in explaining economic and technological development.

A well-known and difficult book. Pomeranz argues that the divergence between Asia and Europe rested on two factors: coal and colonies.

R.

Reid, Anthony, “Global and Local in Southeast Asian History,” International Journal of Asian Studies 1 (2004): 5-21.

Summarizes the argument of Reid’s famous age of commerce theory. Highlights an alternating pattern of globalization and localization in Southeast Asian history with peaks of integration between 1450-1680 and 1780-1840.

Richards, John, “Early Modern India and World History,” Journal of World History 8.2 (1997): 197-210.

Ambitious attempt to define the key features of the early modern world. Richard argues for the existence of six “worldwide processes of change [that were] unprecedented in their scope and intensity.”

S.

Sachsenmaier, Dominic, Global Perspectives on Global History: Theories and Approaches in a Connected World (Cambridge, UK; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

Smail, Daniel Lord, On Deep History and the Brain (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007).

Argues that history begins about 1.7 million years ago, and should be included in history courses. Makes the case that evolutionary psychology offers useful explanatory tools for the historian. Pp. 190-202 are very accessible, but students may wonder what he’s on about. Pp. 157-89 explain this better, but might be hard going for undergraduates.

Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, “Connected Histories: Notes towards a Reconfiguration of Early Modern Eurasia,” Modern Asian Studies 31 (1997): 735-762.

A concise series of reflections on what connections might be in early modern history, and a reassertion of these against alternative traditions of nationalism and historical ethnography. Subrahmanyam does not necessarily deny difference, but does emphasise connection.

V.

De Vries, Jan, “The Limits of Globalization in the Early Modern World,” Economic History Review 63.3 (2010): 710-733.


Part B: The Practice of Global History – Nodes of Encounter and Exchange

Theme 2: Oceans

A.

Abulafia, D. “Mediterranean History as Global History,” History and Theory 50 (2011): 220–228.

B.

Bentley, Jeremy, “Seas and Ocean Basins as Frameworks for Historical Analysis.” Geographical Review 89.2 (1999): 215-225.

Conceptual piece that argues for a move away from a focus on nation states. Suggests that seas and oceans can be used as useful frameworks for analysis.

Benton, Laura, “Legal Spaces of Empire: Piracy and the Origins of Ocean Regionalism,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 47 (2005): 700-24.

Shows the jurisdictional tangles that were such an important characteristic of the early modern seas. Particularly notable for its analysis of how pirates engaged in legal posturing. A good introduction to the work of one of the most important scholars in the field.

Benton, Laura, The search for sovereignty: law and geography in European Empires, 1400-1900 (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Braudel, Fernand, The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II, (London: Collins, 1972).

Broeze, Frank J. A., ed., Brides of the Sea: Port cities of Asia from the 16th-20th Centuries (Kensington, N.S.W.: New South Wales University Press 1989).

C.

Casale, Giancarlo, The Ottoman Age of Exploration (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).

Argues that there was an Ottoman Age of Exploration that parallels European developments. Demonstrates that “Ottomans of the sixteenth century were able to act as protagonists of the first order in creating a newly integrated world system of competing imperial states.”

Chaudhuri, K. N., Trade and Civilization in the Indian Ocean: An Economic History from the Rise of Islam to 1750 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985): Chs. 3; 4.

D.

Das Gupta, Uma, ed., The World of the Indian Ocean Merchant 1500-1800. Collected Essays of Ashin Das Gupta (New Delhi; New York: Oxford University Press, 2004): Introduction by Sanjay Subrahamanyan; Ch. 1: “The Maritime Merchant and Indian History”; Ch. 2: “India and the Indian Ocean 1500-1800”.

E.

Elliott, John, Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America, 1492-1830 (New Haven, Conn.; London: Yale University Press, 2006).

G.

Gill, Conrad, Merchants and Mariners in the Eighteenth Century (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, London, 1961)

H.

Hancock, David, Citizens of the World: London Merchants and the Integration of the British Atlantic Community, 1735-1785 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

L.

Lewis, Martin and Wigen, Karen. “A Maritime Response to the Crisis in Area Studies,” Geographical Review 89.2 (1999): 161-168

M.

Mancke, Elizabeth, “Early Modern Expansion and the Politicization of Oceanic Space.” The Geographical Review 89.2 (April 1999): 225-236.

Good accompaniment to analysis of international law and European dominance over the world’s oceans. Contends that eastwards and westwards expansion facilitated an international order determined and dominated by European expansionist powers, offering that non-European trading networks remained restricted to local seas in the early modern period.

R.

Risso, Patricia, Merchants and Faith: Muslim Commerce and Culture in the Indian Ocean (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1999).

 

S.

Scammell, Geoffrey, The World Encompassed: the first European maritime empires c.800-1650 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981).

A text which appears on the majority of reading lists focused on trade in the pre-modern period. Looks at the maritime trading companies and empires, particularly the English and Dutch in the later part of the period.

Shih, Shu-Mei, Visuality and Identity: Sinophone Articulations across the Pacific (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007).

Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, ed., Maritime India: A History of the People and the Sea (McPherson), Maritime India in the Seventeenth Century (Arasaratnam), and Rival Empires of Trade in the Orient, 1600-1800, (New Delhi; USA: Oxford University Press, 2004): Ch. 3.

 

T.

Trivellato, F., “Renaissance Italy and the Muslim Mediterranean in Recent Historical Work,” Journal of Modern History 82.1 (2010): 127-155.

 

W.

Woodworth, C. K., “Ocean and Steppe: Early Modern World Empires,” Journal of Early Modern History 11.6 (2007): 501-518.

An interesting piece as it puts together Empire, trade and ecology in early modern Eurasia.

 

Z.

Zahedieh, Nuala, The Capital and the Colonies. London and the Atlantic Economy 1660-1760 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010): Chs. 2; 3.

 

 

Theme 3: Cities

 

B.

Blussé, Leonard. Visible Cities: Canton, Nagasaki, and Batavia and the Coming of the Americans (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008).

Broeze, Frank J. A. ed., Brides of the Sea: Port cities of Asia from the 16th-20th Centuries (Kensington, N.S.W.: New South Wales University Press 1989).

Final chapter.

Burke, P., “Early modern Venice as a center of information and communication,” Venice reconsidered: the history and civilization of an Italian city-state, 1297 – 1799, J. Martin and D. Romano, eds. (Baltimore and London, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000): 390-408.

 

D.

Davis, Mike, Planet of Slums (London: Verso, 2006).

On the rise of the megacity in the developing world, and the links between these and the contemporary global economy.

Felix Driver and David Gilbert, “Imperial cities, overlapping territories and intertwined histories,” in Felix Driver and David Gilbert (eds), Imperial Cities: landscape, display and identity (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1999).

De Munck, B. and Winter, A. eds., Gated Communities?: Regulating Migration in Early Modern Cities (Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2012).

Dursteler, E.R., Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean (Baltimore, MA, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006).

Dyster, J., “Argentine and Australian development compared,” Past and Present 84 (August 1979).

 

F.

Frost, Lionel, The new urban frontier: urbanisation and city building in Australasia and the American West (Kensington, N.S.W.: New South Wales University Press, 1991).

 

G.

Glaeser, Edward, The Triumph of the city (London: Macmillan, 2011).

Free-market appraisal of the importance of cities to the contemporary world. Similar to much of Thomas Friedman’s work, but much more academically-informed.

 

H.

Home, Robert K., “The Grand Modell’ of colonial settlement,” in Of planting and planning: the making of British colonial cities (London: E & FN Spon, 1997).

British urban and town planning ideas exported to the colonies

Harvey, David, The condition of postmodernity: an enquiry into the origins of cultural change (Oxford England; Cambrudge, Mass., USA: Blackwell, 1992).

The classic book on the emergence of post-Fordism. Also see his latest book Rebel Cities: from the right to the city to the urban revolution 2012 – a series of essays on the spatial impacts of contemporary global capitalism.

 

K.

Keene, Derek, “Cities and Cultural Exchange,” in Donatella Calabi and Stephen Turk Christensen, eds., Cultural Exchange in Early Modern Europe vol. II (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 2007): 3-27.

A comparative study of how the degree to which a city was the expression of a programmatic cultural identity associated with a state or surrounding territory and the extent to which it was a site of free intellectual and commercial exchange determined the absorption, transfer, or exchange of cultural influence. Ch. 2 by Alex Cowen, “Nodes, networks and hinterlands,” is also relevant.

King, Anthony, The Bungalow: the production of a global culture London; Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1984).

A study of the emergence of the bungalow in India and its export as an ideal dwelling type, especially to the English-speaking world.

King, Anthony, Urbanism colonialism and the world economy (London; New York: Routledge, 1990).

Good study of the imposition of imperial ideas about urbanism and urban planning on the colonial landscape.

*Also see his “The world economy is everywhere: urban history and the world system,” Urban History 10, May 1983.

 

L.

Lane, Frederic C., Venice. A Maritime Republic (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1973).

 

M.

McCarty, J. W., “Australian capital cities in the nineteenth century,” Australian Economic History Review X:2 (September 1970).

Mehta, Suketu, Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found (New York: Vintage Books, 2004).

Mentz, Søren, The English Gentleman Merchant at Work: Madras and the City of London, 1660-1740 (Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, University of Copenhagen, 2005).

Merriman McClain, John and Ugawa, Kaoru, “Ch.1: Edo and Paris: Cities of Power,” in John Merriman McClain and Kaoru Ugawa, eds., Edo and Paris: Urban Life and the State in the Early Modern Era (New York: Cornell University Press, 1994): 3-40.

One of the few books that tries to compare cities, in this case Edo and Paris. It provides a very different perspective to traditional urban/city-by-city histories.

Mumford, Lewis, The city in history (San Diego: Harcourt Brace & Co., 1989). (Original submission dated the text at 1961)

The classic text on the emergence and history of the (western) city.

 

P.

Price, Marie and Benton-Short, Lisa, Migrants to the Metropolis: The Rise of Immigrant Gateway Cities (Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 2008).

A series of case studies of immigrant gateway cities, old and new.

Pullan, Brian, Crisis and Change in the Venetian Economy in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (London: Methuen, 2004).

 

R.

Rothman, E.N., Brokering Empire: Trans-Imperial Subjects between Venice and Istanbul (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009).

 

S.

Sassen, Saskia, The Global City: New York, London, Tokyo,(Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2001) (first published 1991).

The emergence of the post-industrial, information-based global city from the 1970s onward. Somewhat dated now (esp. in relation to Tokyo) but an important milestone book. Also see later updates and derivations.

Sassen, Saskia, ed., Global Networks, Linked Cities (New York: Routledge, 2002).

Schneer, Jonathan, London 1900: the imperial metropolis (New Haven: Tale University Press, 2001).

Both deal with only the metropolitan side of the same issues as King and Home.

 

T.

Trivellato, F., The Familiarity of Strangers: The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009).

Trivellato, F.,, “Renaissance Italy and the Muslim Mediterranean in Recent Historical Work,” Journal of Modern History 82.1 (2010): 127-155.

 

Z.

Zahedieh, Nuala, The Capital and the Colonies. London and the Atlantic Economy 1660-1760 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

Zukin, Sharon, The culture of cities (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1996).

US (indeed mostly New York-focused) study of deindustrialisation and the emergence of culture and cultural production as key drivers of urban economies in the contemporary West.

Zukin, Sharon, Naked city: the death and life of authentic urban places (Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).

Something of an update to the ‘culture’ book, but some interesting discussions on the impact of non-European immigration to New York in the 1980s and 1990s, and the retention of aspects of these cultures and their adaptation (including economic adaptation) to these new environments.

 

Theme 4: Empire

A.

Abulafia, David, The Discovery of Mankind: Atlantic Encounters in the Age of Columbus (New Haven-London, Yale University Press, 2008).

Analyses the encounters of Europeans and the inhabitants of the Americas from 1341 until the early 16th century and the ways in which these early contacts shaped European perceptions of the world.

Anghie, Anthony, Imperialism, sovereignty, and the making of international law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 52-62, 84-87.

Traces the emergence of legal positivism and what constituted ‘civilized’ nations, based on territorial sovereignty. Demonstrates how international law facilitated dominance of imperial powers.

 

B.

Bitterli, Urs, “Cultural Collision: The Spaniards on Hispaniola,” in Urs Bitterli, ed., Cultures in Conflict: Encounters between Europeans and non-European cultures 1492-1800 (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1989): 71-86

Argues that after the extermination of many native inhabitants of Hispaniola in the mid-1490s Spanish authorities made some attempts to subject the fact of cultural contact to theoretical analysis and legal control. The limitations of late-medieval legal concepts and a Christocentric world view doomed these efforts to failure.

 

C.

Casale, Giancarlo, The Ottoman Age of Exploration (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).

Argues that there was an Ottoman Age of Exploration that parallels European developments. Demonstrates that “Ottomans of the sixteenth century were able to act as protagonists of the first order in creating a newly integrated world system of competing imperial states.”

Cooper, Frederick and Stoler, Ann Laura, eds., Tensions of Empire: Colonial Cultures in a Bourgeois World (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997).

Crossgrove, William et al, “Colonialism, International Trade, and the Nation-state”, in Lucile F. Newman, ed., Hunger in History. Food Shortage, Poverty, and Deprivation (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990): 215-40.

A clunky but useful basic introduction to the world history of famine, stressing the importance of European expansion but also of local political structures.

Curtin, P., Death by Migration: Europe’s Encounter of the Colonial World in the Nineteenth Century (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1989).

 

D.

Darwin, John, After Tamerlane: The Rise and Fall of Global Empires, 1400-2000 (London: Bloomsbury, 2008).

A text which features in every global history module on the development of imperialism and empire. Challenges a Eurocentric approach to empire and focuses on the global nature of Asian empires from the Qing and Mughal to the Ottoman.

Deagan, Kathleen and Cruxent, José Maria, Columbus Outpost among the Tainos: Spain and America at La Isabela, 1493-1498 (New Haven: Yale University press, 2002): 47-70 (Ch. 4: “Hell in Hispaniola: La Isabela 1493-1498”).

A study of the initial site of European settlement in America and the first place of sustained interaction between Europeans and the indigenous Tainos.

Dirks, Nicholas B., The Scandal of Empire: India and the Creation of Imperial Britain (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2006).

Dreesbach, Anne, Colonial Exhibitions, Voelkerschauen, and the Display of the Other, in: http://www.ieg-ego.eu/en/threads/models-and-stereotypes/the-wild-and-the-civilized/anne-dreesbach-colonial-exhibitions-voelkerschauen-and-the-display-of-the-other, published 2012-05-03.

Driver, Felix and Gilbert, David, “Imperial cities, overlapping territories and intertwined histories,” in Felix Driver and David Gilbert (eds), Imperial Cities: landscape, display and identity (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1999).

 

E.

Elliot, John, The Old World and the New (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1970).

A now classic study of how traditional European assumptions about geography, theology, history and the nature of man were challenged by the encounter with new peoples and lands.

Elliott, John, Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America, 1492-1830 (New Haven, Conn.; London: Yale University Press, 2006).

 

F.

Farrington, Anthony, Trading Places: The East India Company and Asia 1600-1834 (London: British Library, 2002).

Frost, Lionel, The new urban frontier: urbanisation and city building in Australasia and the American West (Kensington, N.S.W.: New South Wales University Press, 1991).

Furber, Holden, Rival empires of trade, Europe and the World in the Age of Expansion (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota press, 1976).

 

G.

Goldstone, Jack, “East and West in the Seventeenth Century: Political Crises in Stuart England, Ottoman Turkey and Ming China,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 30.1 (1988): 103-142.

The decline of empires has often been examined individually. Here Goldstone argues for a general reconfiguration of world power in the 17th century.

Grafton, Anthony with Siraisi, Nancy, New Worlds, Ancient Texts, the power of tradition and the shock of discovery (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1992).

Examines the evidence about how the discovery of the New World shook the foundations of the old, upsetting the authority of the ancient texts that Europeans so revered.

Greenblatt, Stephen, Marvelous Possessions. The Wonder of the New World (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991).

Analyses the representational practices that Europeans took with them to America and deployed when they described what they saw and did there. Greenblatt argues that wonder was a recurring feature of the early discourse concerning the new world.

Grove, Richard, Green Imperialism: Colonial Expansion, Tropical Island Edens and the Origins of Environmentalism, 1600–1860 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

About how tropical ecologies presented unique challenges to European colonists, who made scientific and agricultural advances through trial and errror; global scientific networks based on colonial experience; and the colonial origins of western conservation movements.

 

H.

Hartz, Louis (ed), The Founding of New Societies: Studies in the History of the United States, Latin America, South Africa, Canada, and Australia (New York, Harcourt, Brace & World, 1964).

Home, Robert K., “The Grand Modell’ of colonial settlement,” in Of planting and planning: the making of British colonial cities (London: E & FN Spon, 1997).

British urban and town planning ideas exported to the colonies

 

K.

King, Anthony, Urbanism colonialism and the world economy (London; New York: Routledge, 1990).

Good study of the imposition of imperial ideas about urbanism and urban planning on the colonial landscape.

*Also see his “The world economy is everywhere: urban history and the world system,” Urban History 10, May 1983.

 

L.

Lane, Kris E., Color of Paradise: The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2010).

Larner, John, Marco Polo and the Discovery of the World (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999): 8-30 (Ch. 1: “Images of Asia and the Coming of the Mongols”); 88-104 (Ch. 5: “The Description of the World”)

 

M.

Mancke, Elizabeth, “Early Modern Expansion and the Politicization of Oceanic Space.” The Geographical Review 89.2 (April 1999): 225-236

Good accompaniment to analysis of international law and European dominance over the world’s oceans. Contends that eastwards and westwards expansion facilitated an international order determined and dominated by European expansionist powers, offering that non-European trading networks remained restricted to local seas in the early modern period.

Marshall, Peter J., “The English in Asia to 1700,” in Nicholas Canny, ed., The Oxford History of the British Empire: the Origins of Empire (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998): 264-285 (Ch. 12).

Marshall, Peter J., “The British in Asia: Trade to Dominion, 1700-1765,” in P.J. Marshall, ed., The Oxford History of the British Empire: the Eighteenth Century (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998): 487-450 (Ch. 22).

McCarty, J. W., “Australia as a region of recent settlement in the nineteenth century,” Australian Economic History Review XII: 2 (September 1973).

 

O.

O’Connell, M., Men of Empire: Power and Negotiation in Venice’s Maritime State (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009).

Olschki, Leonardo, Marco Polo’s Asia; an introduction to his ‘description of the world called “il Milione”’ (Berkeley-Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1960): 127-146 (Ch. 4: “Aspects of Asiatic Civilization in Marco Polo’s book”).

Argues that Marco Polo’s interest in his text is primarily in the human geography of Asia and that he was a proto ethnographer in his approach to the customs he observed.

 

Q.

Qureshi, Sadiah, Peoples on Parade. Exhibitions, Empire, and Anthropology in Nineteenth Century Britain (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).

 

P.

Pagden, Anthony, European Encounters with the New World: From Renaissance to Romanticism (New Haven CT-London: Yale University Press, 1993): “Introduction”, Chs. 1-3.

Perdue, Peter C., China Marches West: the Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2005).

 

S.

Scammell, Geoffrey, The World Encompassed: the first European maritime empires c.800-1650 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981)

A text which appears on the majority of reading lists focused on trade in the pre-modern period. Looks at the maritime trading companies and empires, particularly the English and Dutch in the later part of the period.

Schedvin, C. B., “Staples and regions of Pax Britannia,” Economic History Review, 2nd series XLIII: 4 (1990.)

Schneer, Jonathan, London 1900: the imperial metropolis (New Haven: Tale University Press, 2001).

Both deal with only the metropolitan side of the same issues as King and Home.

Schwartz, Stuart, ed., Implicit Understandings: Observing, Reporting and Reflecting on the Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994).

One of the best collections of essays on cross-cultural encounters and interactions. Challenging past Eurocentric historiography on approaching other cultures, looks at various aspects such as material culture, cartography, and ethnography in the creation of cross-cultural perceptions and representations across a broad geographical range, taking a two-way perspective on the impact of encounters.

Sengoopta, Chandak, Imprint of the Raj: How fingerprinting was born in colonial India (Basingstoke; Oxford: Pan Books, 2004).

Stoler, Ann Laura, Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Power: Race and the Intimate in Colonial Rule (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002).

 

T.

Tracy, James B., The Rise of Merchant Empires: Long-Distance Trade in the Early Mondern World 1350-1730 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991).

Trexler, Richard, Sex and Conquest: Gendered Violence, Political order and the European Conquest of the Americas (Ithaca New York: Cornell University Press, 1995).

Analyses the erotics of power in early modern Iberia and compares the patterns of gendered dominance and submission with those in the native American world.

 

W.

Wolf, Eric, Europe and the People without History (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982).

Fairly classic expansion of Europe approach. Chap. 6 on the fur trade is a less usual focus; chap 7 on Atlantic slave trade; chap 8 on ‘Trade and Conquest in the Orient’.

White, Richard, The middle ground: Indians, empires, and republics in the Great Lakes region, 1650-1815 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991).

Hugely influential work that argues for the existence of a “place in between: in between cultures, peoples, and in between empires and the non state world of villages.” Moved the discussion away from a focus on conquest to look at the complex dynamics of contact.

Z.

Zahedieh, Nuala, The Capital and the Colonies. London and the Atlantic Economy 1660-1760 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

Zilfi, Madeleine, Women in the Ottoman Empire: Middle Eastern Women in the Early Modern Era (Leiden: Brill, 1997).

Zimmerman, Andrew, “Adventures in the Skin Trade: Physical Anthropology and the Colonial Encounter,” in Matti Bunzl and Glenn Penny, eds., Worldly Provincialism: German Anthropology in the Age of Empire (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002): 156-178 .

Zimmerman, Andrew, “Three Logics of Race: Theory and Exception in the Transnational History of Empire,” New Global Studies 4.1 (2010).


Part C: The Practice of Global History – Modes of Encounter and Exchange

Theme 5: Trade and commodities (Movement of goods)

A.

Abulafia, David, ‘The Role of Trade in Muslim-Christian Contact during the Middle Ages’, in Dionisius Agius and Richard Hitchcock, eds., The Arab Influence in Medieval Europe (Reading: Ithaca Press: 1994): 1-24.

Suggests that Western and Islamic economies were increasingly interdependent in the medieval period but Europeans gained little understanding of Islamic culture. Their contact with Muslims was almost entirely commercial because merchants were confined within fonduqs, enclaves of European traders.

B.

Beckert, Sven, “Emancipation and Empire: Reconstructing the Worldwide Web of Cotton Production in the Age of the American Civil War,” American Historical Review 109.5 (2004): 1405-1438.

Beckwith, Christopher I., Empires of the Silk Road: a history of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the present (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009).

Berg, Maxine and Eger, Elizabeth, eds., Luxury in the Eighteenth Century: Debates, Desires and Delectable Goods (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002).

Berg, Maxine, “In Pursuit of Luxury: Global Origins of British Consumer Goods,” Past and Present 182 (2004): 85-142.

Maxine argues that it was Asian luxuries that sparkled the Industrial revolution. A very bold and challenging hypothesis that puts together trade, material culture and the ‘old horse’ of the Industrial Revolution.

Berger Hochstrasser, Julie, Still Life and Trade in the Dutch Golden Age (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2007).

Similar to above, but specific to still life paintings, and constructs an argument that’s also about ways of seeing and visual culture, rather than just trade networks.

Bowen, Huw, The Business of Empire: The East India Company and Imperial Britain, 1756-1833 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).

Brewer, John and Porter, Roy, eds., Consumption and the World of Goods (London: Routledge, 1997)

Brook, Timothy, Vermeer’s Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2008).

A very accessible book that examines several objects in famous Vermeer paintings that could only have been there for the fact of global trade networks between SE Asia/China/Japan/North America and the Netherlands/Europe.

 

C.

Chaudhuri, K.N., Trade and Civilization in the Indian Ocean: An Economic History from the Rise of Islam to 1750 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985): Chs. 3; 4.

Christian, David, “Silk Roads or Steppe Roads? The Silk Roads in World History,”Journal of World History, 11.1 (2000): 1-26.

Christian looks at what he terms “transecological” interactions between the pastoralist and agrarian areas of the Silk Road, rather than simply conceptualising the network as a “transcivilisational” exchange. Important emphasis on the role of the local in the global: the Silk Road as a global network was only created by subsystems of regional trade,

Clunas, Craig, “Modernity Global and Local: Consumption and the Rise of the West,” American Historical Review, 104.5 (1999): 1497-1511.

Crossgrove, William et al, “Colonialism, International Trade, and the Nation-state”, in Lucile F. Newman, ed., Hunger in History. Food Shortage, Poverty, and Deprivation (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990): 215-40.

A clunky but useful basic introduction to the world history of famine, stressing the importance of European expansion but also of local political structures.

Curtis, Wayne, And A Bottle of Rum: A History of the World in Ten Cocktails (USA: Crown Publishing Group, 2006).

D.

De Vries, Jan, The industrious revolution: consumer behavior and the household economy, 1650 to the present (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).

E.

Eang Cheong, Wang, Hong Merchants of Canton: Chinese Merchants in Sino-Western Trade, 1684-1798 (Richmond: Curzon Press, 1997)

F.

Farrington, Anthony, Trading Places: The East India Company and Asia 1600-1834 (London: British Library, 2002).

Fichter, James, So Great a Profit: How the East Indies Trade Transformed Anglo-American Capitalism (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010).

Flynn, Dennis O. and Giráldez, Arturo, “Cycles of Silver: Global Economic Unity through the Mid-Eighteenth Century,” Journal of World History 13.2 (2002): 391-427.

Flynn and Giraldez have written extensively about silver and here they argue that precious metals were fundamental in the first phase of globalisation in the Early Modern period. Two of the most important scholars of silver, they argue that precious metals were fundamental in the first stage of globalisation in the early modern period, usefully identifying two main phases of silver flow and economic integration.

Freedman, Paul, Out of the East: Spices and the Medieval Imagination (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008): 1-18 (Introduction, “Spices: A Global Commodity”); 164-192 (Ch. 7: “Searching for the Realms of Spices”); 193-214 (Ch. 8: “Finding the Realms of Spices”).

Examines why there was such a huge demand for spices in Europe between c. 1000-1513 and how the spice market launched Europe on the path to overseas conquest.

Furber, Holden, Rival empires of trade, Europe and the World in the Age of Expansion (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota press, 1976).

G.

Gill, Conrad, Merchants and Mariners in the Eighteenth Century (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, London, 1961).

Glamann, Kristof, Dutch-Asiatic Trade, 1620-1740 (Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff, 1981)

Greenblatt, Stephen, Marvelous Possessions. The Wonder of the New World (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991).

Analyses the representational practices that Europeans took with them to America and deployed when they described what they saw and did there. Greenblatt argues that wonder was a recurring feature of the early discourse concerning the new world.

Greif, Avner, “Reputation and Coalitions in Medieval Trade: Evidence on the Maghribi Traders,” Journal of Economic History 49 (1989): 857-882.

H.

Hancock, David, Oceans of Wine: Madeira and the Emergence of American Trade and Taste (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009).

Huxtable Elliott, John, Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America, 1492-1830 (New Haven, Conn.; London: Yale University Press, 2006).

Hogendorn, Jan and Johnson, Marion, The Shell Money of the Slave Trade, African Studies Series 49 (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986).

I.

Inikori, J.E., Africans and the Industrial Revolution in England: A study in international trade and development (Cambridge England; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

K.

Keller, William and Pauly, Louis, “Globalization at Bay,” Current History (November 1997), 370-376.

Attests that multinational corporations are shaped by national political structures and serve primarily national interests, and therefore are not ‘globalized’.

Klein, Herbert S., The Atlantic Slave Trade (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999).

The best short survey I know. Chapter 3, on Africa, is a wonderful summary of that continent’s growing participation in the world system. Chapter 4, on European organization of the slave trade, is a superb survey of the Atlantic trade.

L.

Lane, Kris E., Color of Paradise: The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2010)

Lemire, Beverly, “Fashioning Global Trade: Indian Textiles, Gender Meanings and European Consumers, 1500-1800,” in Giorgio Riello and Tirthankar Roy, eds., How India Clothed the World: The World of South Asian Textiles, 1500-1850 (Leiden: Brill, 2009)

M.

Marshall, Peter J., “The English in Asia to 1700,” in Nicholas Canny, ed., The Oxford History of the British Empire: the Origins of Empire (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998): 264-285 (Ch. 12).

Marshall, Peter J., “The British in Asia: Trade to Dominion, 1700-1765,” in P.J. Marshall, ed., The Oxford History of the British Empire: the Eighteenth Century (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998): 487-450 (Ch. 22)

Mathee, Rudi, “Exotic Substances: The Introduction and Global Spread of Tobacco, Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, and Distilled Liquor, Sixteenth to Eighteenth Centuries,” in Roy Porter and Mikulás Teich, eds. Drugs and Narcotics in History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

Traces the remarkably rapid spread of these important substances. Short essay that opens up a range of possibilities for further study.

Maxwell, Robyn, Textiles of Southeast Asia: Tradition, Trade and Transformation. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990).

Trade and cultural-religious links between India, the Middle East, Europe, China and SE Asia through the prism of textiles.

McCants, Anne E., “Exotic Goods, Popular Consumption, and the Standard of Living: Thinking about Globalization in the Early Modern World,” Journal of World History 28.4 (2007): 433-462.

MacGregor, N., “The First Global Economy (1450 – 1600 AD),” A History of the World in 100 Objects, BBC, 20 September 20. < http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00tnkdj#>

Mentz, Søren, The English Gentleman Merchant at Work: Madras and the City of London, 1660-1740 (Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, University of Copenhagen, 2005).

Mintz, Sidney, Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History (New York: Viking, 1985).

Pioneering work that examines the transformation of sugar from a sixteenth century luxury to a eighteenth century staple. Brings together world history and food in a particularly innovative way.

Moore, Karl and Lewis, David, Multinationals, Transcontinentals and Entrepreneurs: 2000 Years of International Business (Unpub.), 6-7, 12-13, 25-31, 45-47, 48, 100, 108-112, 125-127, and 142.

Moore, Karl and Lewis, David, Birth of the multinational: 2000 years of ancient business history from Ashur to Augustus (Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press, 1999).

A history of the multinational and the world economy from 2000 B.C. to 100 A.D

Moore, Karl and Lewis, David, The origins of globalization (New York: Routledge, 2009).

Analyses the businesses practices of the ancient world and argues that a mixed economy existed at this time, exhibiting many of the characteristics generally associated with present-day globalization.

Murdoch, Steve, Network North: Scottish Kin, Commercial and Covert Associations in Northern Europe 1603-1746 (Leiden: Brill, 2006).

P.

Prakash, Om, “The Indian Maritime Merchant, 1500-1800,” Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 47.3 (2004): 435-457.

Parthasarathi, Prasannan, “Review Article: The Great Divergence,” Past and Present 176 (2002): 275-293

Probably the best critique of Pomeranz’s important book. Parthasarathi argues that consumption and technology should be given more space in narratives of divergence.

Pomeranz ,Kenneth and Topik, Steven, The World That Trade Created: Society, Culture, and the World Economy 2nd edition (New York: M.E. Sharpe, 2006).

Breaks down global economic historical processes into short, accessible articles that reveal the ancient roots of present-day globalization. Great entry-level text with topics so diverse as to be applicable to many facets of economic history.

Prestholdt, Jeremy, “On the Global Repercussions of East African Consumerism,” American Historical Review 109.3 (2004): 755-782.

Price, Jacob, “What did Merchants Do? Reflections on British Overseas Trade 1660-1790,” Journal of Economic History 49 (1989): 267-284.

Pullan, Brian, Crisis and Change in the Venetian Economy in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (London: Methuen, 2004).

R.

Risso, Patricia, Merchants and Faith: Muslim Commerce and Culture in the Indian Ocean (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1999).

Richards, John F., ed., Precious Metals in the Later Medieval and Early Modern Worlds (Durham, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press, 1983).

Rothschild, Emma, “A Horrible Tragedy in the French Atlantic,” Past & Present, 192.1 (2006):67-108.

This piece is more on flows of human capital, but it is an important addition for discussing empires & peripheries, migration and other issues relating to global trade.

S.

Seabright, Paul, The Company of Strangers: A Natural History of Economic Life (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2004).

Why do humans collaborate with each other? This simple question starts one of the most exciting analyses of our love for complex organisational structures (like Universities).

Spufford, Peter, Power and Profit: The Merchant in Medieval Europe (London: Thames and Hudson, 2006).

Sun, Laichen, “Chinese Military Technology Transfers and the Emergence of Northern Mainland Southeast Asia, c. 1390-1527,” Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 34.3 (2003): 495-517.

Examines the spread of Chinese gunpowder technology to Southeast Asia across both overland and maritime routes. Moves away from the conventional focus on Europeans as the primary agent of technology transfer. Argues for the existence of a military revolution in Chinese history.

 

T.

Tracy, James B., The Rise of Merchant Empires: Long-Distance Trade in the Early Modern World 1350-1730 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991).

 

W.

Wilkins, Mira, “Multinational Corporations: An Historical Account,” in Richard Kozul-Wright and Bob Rowthorn (eds.), Transnational corporations and the global economy (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Macmillan Press Ltd; New York, N.Y.: St. Martin’s Press, 1998): 1-32.

Wills, John E., “European consumption and Asian production in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries,” in Porter and Brewer (eds), Consumption and the World of Goods (London; New York : Routledge, 1993).

Wolf, Eric, Europe and the People without History (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982).

Fairly classic expansion of Europe approach. Ch. 6 on the fur trade is a less usual focus; Ch. 7 on Atlantic slave trade; Ch. 8 on “Trade and Conquest in the Orient”.

Wood, Frances, The Silk Road: two thousand years in the heart of Asia (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002).

Z.

Zahedieh, Nuala, The Capital and the Colonies. London and the Atlantic Economy 1660-1760 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

Theme 6: Technology, science, religion, ideology (Movement of ideas)

A.

Abulafia, David, ‘The Role of Trade in Muslim-Christian Contact during the Middle Ages’, in Dionisius Agius and Richard Hitchcock, eds., The Arab Influence in Medieval Europe (Reading: Ithaca Press: 1994): 1-24.

Suggests that Western and Islamic economies were increasingly interdependent in the medieval period but Europeans gained little understanding of Islamic culture. Their contact with Muslims was almost entirely commercial because merchants were confined within fonduqs, enclaves of European traders.

Armitage, David and Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, The Age of Revolutions in Global Context, c. 1760-1840 (Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire; New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).

Adas, Michael, Machines as the Measure of Men. Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance (New York: Cornell University Press, 1989): 21-127 (chapters 1-2).

A very creative and important book that is however little known. It argues that Europeans used technology as a way to evaluate other parts of the world in the early modern period.

Anderson, W., “Where is the Post-Colonial History of Medicine?” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 72.3 (1998): 522–530.

Andrade, Tonio, “An accelerating divergence? The revisionist model of world history and the question of Eurasian military parity: data from East Asia.” Canadian Journal of Sociology 36.2 (Spring 2011): 185-208.

Contextualizes the revisionist debate on military modernization models of European and Asian powers through closer examination of Sino-Dutch War (1661-1668). Examines the Chinese Military Revolution of the fourteenth century and makes clear, accessible commentary on technological hybridity. Considers the timing of the divergence between Europe and Asia.

Armitage, David and Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, The Age of Revolutions in Global Context, c. 1760-1840 (Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire; New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).

B.

Bayly, C. A., ‘From Archaic Globalization to International Networks, circa 1600–2000’, in Interactions: Transregional Perspectives on World History, ed. Jerry Bentley, Renate Bridenthal and Anand Yang, Honolulu, 2005.

Argues for the existence of a period of archaic globalization that was underpinned by three developments: universalizing kingship, the expansion of cosmic religions and understandings of bodily health. An innovative analysis of early forms of global networks.

Bashford, A., “Global Biopolitics and the History of World Health,” History of the Human Sciences 91.1 (2006): 67–88.

Bhabha, Homi, ed., Nation and Narration (London; New York: Routledge, 1990)

Bitterli, Urs, “Cultural Collision: The Spaniards on Hispaniola,” in Urs Bitterli, ed., Cultures in Conflict: Encounters between Europeans and non-European cultures 1492-1800 (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1989): 71-86.

Argues that after the extermination of many native inhabitants of Hispaniola in the mid-1490s Spanish authorities made some attempts to subject the fact of cultural contact to theoretical analysis and legal control. The limitations of late-medieval legal concepts and a Christocentric world view doomed these efforts to failure.

Breen, Tim, The Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).

Bruckner, Sierra,Voelkerschauen, Spectacles of (Human) Nature: Commercial Ethnography between Leisure, Learning, and Schaulust,” in Matti Bunzl and Glenn Penny, eds., Worldly Provincialism: German Anthropology in the Age of Empire (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002).

C.

Caplan, Jane and Torpey, John, eds., Documenting Individual Identity: The Development of State Practices in the Modern World (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001) (relevant articles).

Connelly, Matthew, A Diplomatic Revolution: Algeria’s Fight for Independence and the Origins of the Post-Cold War Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002).

Draws together themes of post-colonial independence movement, Third World nationalism, Cold War divisions and international attention. Argues that the Algerian Revolution’s primary offensive was diplomatic, and that the war was won on the stage of international opinion rather than in the military realm.

Cook, Harold John, Matters of Exchange: Commerce, Medicine and Science in the Dutch Golden Age (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007).

D.

Davies, Kate, “A Moral Purchase: femininity, commerce and abolition 1788-1792,” in Eger, Grant et al. Women, Writing and the Public Sphere: 1700-1830 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001)

Davis, N.D., Trickster Travels: A Sixteenth-Century Muslim between Worlds (New York: Hill & Wang, 2006).

Dreesbach, Anne, Colonial Exhibitions, Voelkerschauen, and the Display of the Other, in: http://www.ieg-ego.eu/en/threads/models-and-stereotypes/the-wild-and-the-civilized/anne-dreesbach-colonial-exhibitions-voelkerschauen-and-the-display-of-the-other, published 2012-05-03.

E.

Eaton, Richard, “Islamic History as Global History,” in Michael Adas, ed. Islamic and European Expansion: The Forging of a Global Order (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1993):

A highly useful analysis of the role of religion in the formation of global networks. Focusing on the nature of the highly integrated area of Afro-Eurasian created by the expansion of Islam (the first ‘global civilization’), Eaton persuasively argues that the “Dar al-Islam” should be viewed as dynamic, adaptive and syncretic. Eaton both summarises traditional approaches, and supports new theories of “Islamization” to develop an understanding of Islam as a global civilization.

G.

Gould, Stephen J., The Mismeasure of Man (New York; London: Norton, 1981).

Grove, Richard, Green Imperialism: Colonial Expansion, Tropical Island Edens and the Origins of Environmentalism, 1600–1860 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

About how tropical ecologies presented unique challenges to European colonists, who made scientific and agricultural advances through trial and errror; global scientific networks based on colonial experience; and the colonial origins of western conservation movements.

H.

Hanks, Merry Weisner, Gender in History: Global Perspectives (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011).

Harvey, D., A Brief History of Neoliberalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005).

Hardin, Sandra, ed., The Racial Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003).

Hoberman, John, Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (New York: The Free Press, 1992).

Hobsbawm, Eric, Nations and Nationalism since 1780 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992): 131-62 (“The Apogee of Nationalism, 1918-1950”).

Hodges, S., “The Global Menace,” Social History of Medicine 25.3 (2012): 719-728. Now a bit dated, but still a great survey of the spread and adaptation of a European concept.

J.

Jardine, Lisa, Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance (Chatham, Kent: Macmillan, 1996): 133-180 (Ch. 3: “The Triumph of the Book”).

In Ch. 3, Jardine discusses the significance of the shift from manuscript to print on the wider dissemination of knowledge and new ideas. It also examines the more rigorous and systematic attempts by authorities to monitor controversial books through censorship and the Inquisition.

 

K.

Kiernan, Ben, Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2007): “Introduction.”

First clarifies terminology of genocide studies and briefly traces the history of internationally-recognized legal frameworks and institutions in use today. Categorizes historical genocide and extermination cases as driven by ideological, agricultural and/or expansionist factors.

Koskenniemi, Martti, Gentle Civilizer of Nations: The Rise and Fall of International Law 1870-1960 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004).

Traces the emergence of a liberal sensibility relating to international matters in the late nineteenth century, and its subsequent decline after the Second World War. Argues that international law was born from the impulse to ‘civilize’ late nineteenth-century attitudes towards race and society.

Kuriyama, Shigehisa, The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine (New York: Zone, 2002).

 

L.

Laffan, Michael Francis, Islamic Nationhood and Colonial Indonesia: The Umma Below the Winds (London and New York: Routledge Curzon, 2003).

About globalization and Islam in SE Asia, focusing on Indonesian examples – links in the Islamic world through travelling scholars, through pilgrimage to Mecca, through anti-colonial politics; even a chapter on how Muslims in Indonesia thought about Meiji Japan as an alternative power.

Lakoff, Andrew, Pharmaceutical Reason: Reason and Value in Global Psychiatry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).

 

M.

Maxwell, Robyn, Textiles of Southeast Asia: Tradition, Trade and Transformation. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990).

Trade and cultural-religious links between India, the Middle East, Europe, China and SE Asia through the prism of textiles.

Mokyr, Joel, The Lever of Riches. Technological Creativity and Economic Progress (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990): 151-192 (Chapter 7).

Mokyr uses a comparative approach to show the trajectories of technological development of different areas of the world, in particular China and Europe.

 

N.

Najmabadi, Afsaneh, Women with Mustaches and Men without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties in Iranian Modernity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005).

 

P.

Pick, Daniel, Faces of Degeneration: A European Disorder, c. 1848-1918 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989).

 

R.

Rabinbach, Anson, The Human Motor: Energy, Fatigue, and the Origins of Modernity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002).

Risso, Patricia, Merchants and Faith: Muslim Commerce and Culture in the Indian Ocean (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1999).

 

S.

Sappol, Michael A., Traffic of Dead Bodies: Anatomy and Embodied Social Identity in Nineteenth Century America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004).

Sengoopta, Chandak, Imprint of the Raj: How fingerprinting was born in colonial India (Basingstoke; Oxford: Pan Books, 2004).

Stocking, George W., ed., Bones, Bodies, Behavior: Essays in Biological Anthropology (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1988).

Stocking, George W., ed., Volksgeist as Method and Ethic: Essays on Boasian Ethnography and the German Anthropological Tradition (Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 1996).

 

T.

Thompson, William, “The Military Superiority Thesis and the Ascendancy of Western Eurasia in the World System,” Journal of World History 10.1 (1999): 143-178.

Provides a good overview of Parker’s famous military revolution argument. Argues for the importance of non-technological factors in explaining European success.

Secondary reading: Kenneth Chase, Firearms: A Global History to 1700 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003).

 

Z.

Zimmerman, Andrew, “Three Logics of Race: Theory and Exception in the Transnational History of Empire,” New Global Studies 4.1 (2010).

 

 

Theme 7: Diaspora, migration, travel (Movement of people)

 

C.

Campbell, Mary, The Witness and the World: Exotic European Travel writing 400-1600 (Ithaca New York: Cornell University Press, 1988).

Curtin, P., Death by Migration: Europe’s Encounter of the Colonial World in the Nineteenth Century (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1989).

Cohen, Robin, Global Diasporas: An Introduction (London: Routledge, 1997).

Cohen proposes a series of case studies of diasporas. An excellent book; very suitable for students

Cohen, Robin, “Diasporas, the Nation-State and Globalization,” in Wang Gungwu (ed.), Global History and Migrations (Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1997): 117-143.

Analyses the broader historical ramifications of forced and voluntary migration.

 

D.

Davis, N.D., Trickster Travels: A Sixteenth-Century Muslim between Worlds (New York: Hill & Wang, 2006).

De Munck, B. and Winter, A., eds., Gated Communities?: Regulating Migration in Early Modern Cities (Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2012).

Dursteler, E.R., Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean (Baltimore, MA, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006).

 

G.

Gelman Taylor, Jean, “Meditations on a portrait from seventeenth-century Batavia,” Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 37.1 (2006): 23-41.

Looks at a famous family portrait in the Rijksmuseum as pictorial evidence of migration, Asian-European intermarriage, and living in a hybrid Dutch-Asian idiom in the VOC period. Also traces the social biography of the painting as further evidence of moving goods and ideas.

Ghosh, Amitav, In an Antique Land: History in the Guise of a Traveler’s Tale (London: Granta, 1992)

Gozzini, Giovanni, “The global system of international migrations, 1900 and 2000: a comparative approach,” Journal of Global History 1.3 (2006): 321-341.

A neat way to compare present and past and challenge the idea that the present is more globalised than the past. Gozzini shows that this might not be true for migrations.

Greenblatt, Stephen, Marvelous Possessions. The Wonder of the New World (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991).

Analyses the representational practices that Europeans took with them to America and deployed when they described what they saw and did there. Greenblatt argues that wonder was a recurring feature of the early discourse concerning the new world.

Gungwu, Wang, “Migrations and Its Enemies,” in Bruce Mazlish, Conceptualizing Global History (Boulder: Westview Press, 1993): 131-151.

Considers the Atlantic slave trade and Jewish diaspora in the context of discussing involuntary migration.

 

H.

Hartz, Louis (ed), The Founding of New Societies: Studies in the History of the United States, Latin America, South Africa, Canada, and Australia (New York, Harcourt, Brace & World, 1964).

Howard, Deborah, “The Status of the Oriental Traveller in Renaissance Venice,” in Reorienting the Renaissance: Cultural Exchanges with the East, Gerald MacLean, ed. (Houndmills Basingstoke- NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005): 29-49.

Examines the importance of knowledge about faraway places in Venetian culture.

Huxtable Elliott, John, Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America, 1492-1830 (New Haven, Conn.; London: Yale University Press, 2006).

Hancock, David, Citizens of the World: London Merchants and the Integration of the British Atlantic Community, 1735-1785 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

 

I.

Ibn Battuta, (translated by H. A. R. Gibb), The Travels of Ibn Battuta, A.D. 1325-1354, Vol. 4 (London 1994): 947.

 

J.

Jardine, Lisa, Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance (Chatham, Kent: Macmillan, 1996): 133-180 (Ch. 3: “The Triumph of the Book”).

In Ch. 3, Jardine discusses the significance of the shift from manuscript to print on the wider dissemination of knowledge and new ideas. It also examines the more rigorous and systematic attempts by authorities to monitor controversial books through censorship and the Inquisition.

 

K.

Klein, Herbert S., The Atlantic Slave Trade (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999).

The best short survey I know. Chapter 3, on Africa, is a wonderful summary of that continent’s growing participation in the world system. Chapter 4, on European organization of the slave trade, is a superb survey of the Atlantic trade.

 

L.

Linebough, Peter and Rediker, Marcus: The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slaves, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic (Boston: Verso, 2000).

Lucassen, J. and Lucassen, L., “The mobility transition revisited, 1500–1900: what the case of Europe can offer to global history,” Journal of Global History 4.3 (2009): 347 -377.

M.

Mancall, Peter, ed., Bringing the World to early Modern Europe: Travel Accounts and their Audiences (Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2007).

McCarty, J. W., “Australia as a region of recent settlement in the nineteenth century,” Australian Economic History Review XII: 2 (September 1973).

McKeown, Adam, “Global Migration, 1846-1940.” Journal of World History 15.2 (2004): 155-189.

Argues for a global approach by examining three major circuits of long-distance migration, the Americas, North Asia and Southeast Asia. Suggests that mass migration reached a new peak in the 1920s. One of the best short examinations of mass migration.

Murdoch, Steve, Network North: Scottish Kin, Commercial and Covert Associations in Northern Europe 1603-1746 (Leiden: Brill, 2006).

O.

Olschki, Leonardo, Marco Polo’s Asia; an introduction to his ‘description of the world called “il Milione”’ (Berkeley-Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1960): 127-146 (Ch. 4: “Aspects of Asiatic Civilization in Marco Polo’s book”).

Argues that Marco Polo’s interest in his text is primarily in the human geography of Asia and that he was a proto ethnographer in his approach to the customs he observed.

Osnos, Evan, “The Grand Tour: Europe on Fifteen Hundred Yuan a Day,” New Yorker, 18 April 2011.

A very amusing piece on a group of Chinese on a package holiday around Europe.

P.

Pratt, Mary Louise, Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation (London; New York: Routledge, 1992).

Price, Marie and Benton-Short, Lisa, Migrants to the Metropolis: The Rise of Immigrant Gateway Cities (Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 2008).

A series of case studies of immigrant gateway cities, old and new.

R.

Rothman, E.N., Brokering Empire: Trans-Imperial Subjects between Venice and Istanbul (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009).

Rothschild, Emma, “A Horrible Tragedy in the French Atlantic,” Past & Present, 192.1 (2006):67-108.

This piece is more on flows of human capital, but it is an important addition for discussing empires & peripheries, migration and other issues relating to global trade.

T.

Trivellato, F., The Familiarity of Strangers: The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009).

V.

Verberckmoes, Johan, “The imaginative recreation of overseas cultures in western European pageants in the sixteenth to seventeenth centuries,” in Herman Roodenburg, ed., Cultural Exchange in Early Modern Europe vol. IV (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 2007): 361-380.

Verberckmoes argues that representations of foreign peoples and cultures in European parades depended on the state of knowledge about various territories and the visual material available in the form of prints, paintings and material objects. Foreign cultures were presented as subject to European influence and authority but European audiences also subscribed to ideas about cultural variations and accepted the specific circumstances of exotic presentations.

Z.

Zukin, Sharon, Naked city: the death and life of authentic urban places (Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).

Something of an update to the ‘culture’ book, but some interesting discussions on the impact of non-European immigration to New York in the 1980s and 1990s, and the retention of aspects of these cultures and their adaptation (including economic adaptation) to these new environments.

Theme 8: Ecology, environment, disease (Movement of biota and microbes)

A.

Arnold, D., Colonizing the Body: State Medicine and Epidemic Disease in Nineteenth-Century India (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1993).

C.

Christian, David, “Silk Roads or Steppe Roads? The Silk Roads in World History,”Journal of World History, 11.1 (2000): 1-26.

Christian looks at what he terms “transecological” interactions between the pastoralist and agrarian areas of the Silk Road, rather than simply conceptualising the network as a “transcivilisational” exchange. Important emphasis on the role of the local in the global: the Silk Road as a global network was only created by subsystems of regional trade.

Crosby, Alfred, Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900–1900 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986).

Classic study of how European diseases, plants and animals ‘colonized’ the ‘new world’.

Crosby, Alfred, The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492 (Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 2003): 35-63 (Chapter 2).

A classic and a very lively read. Crosby coined the term ‘Columbian exchange’ with this book.

The central text on the integration of the globe through ecological/environmental factors, Crosby terms the exchange of crops, diseases and animals that followed the discovery of the Americas the “Columbian exchange”, and shows how it was highly important in the development of a globalisation.

D.

Diamond, Jared, Guns, Germs and Steel: A Short History of Everybody for the Last 13,000 Years (London: Vintage, 1998).

Not everyone might agree with Diamond, but this is the right text for a good discussion, in particular on the role on the environment and animals in human history.

Grove, Richard. Green Imperialism: Colonial Expansion, Tropical Island Edens and the Origins of Environmentalism, 1600–1860 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

About how tropical ecologies presented unique challenges to European colonists, who made scientific and agricultural advances through trial and errror; global scientific networks based on colonial experience; and the colonial origins of western conservation movements.

M.

Marks, Robert B., “Commercialization without Capitalism: Processes of Environmental Change in South China, 1550-1850’, Environmental History 1 (1996): 56-82.

The commercialization of agriculture produced by the rise in demand resulting from growth in world trade led to large-scale changes in land use, including massive deforestation.

Marks, Robert B., The Origins of the Modern World: A Global and Ecological Narrative 2nd ed. (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003).

Tries to construct a non-Eurocentric world history, largely emphasizing economic growth and state power, that challenges ‘rise of the West’ theories. The approach is chronological, so any section is suitable for our purpose. The entire book is 200 pages.

McNeill, W. H., Plagues and Peoples (New York: Anchor Books, 1998): 141-84 (Ch. 4: “The Impact of the Mongol Empire”).

One of the central texts on the multifaceted role of disease in world history, simultaneously creating and destroying global networks. Looks at the demographic, technological, and epidemiological aspects of global disease, as well as its political, economic and cultural consequences.

Another classic in world history. McNeill complements Crosby’s analysis by focusing on illness as one of the major connectors in world history.

Offers an interpretation of world history via the political, demographic, ecological, and psychological impact of disease on cultures. Considers how trade, migration and travel have brought cultures into contact with one another through the transference of disease.

P.

Pyne, Stephen, Vestal Fire: an environmental history, told through fire, if Europe and Europe’s encounter with the world (Seattle & London: University of Washington Press, 1997): 463-99.

Explores the impact of European fire practices on other parts of the world, and European responses to different fire regimes in other places.

R.

Radkau, Joachim, Nature and Power: A Global History of the Environment (Washington, D.C.: German Historical Institute; Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press 2008): 152- 194.

Starts with plague in China as an example of the creation of a microbial globalism, through to the impact of European, Russian, and American colonialism. Other parts of the book are also valuable.

Richards, John F., The Unending Frontier. An Environmental History of the Early Modern World (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003): 17-57.

Argues there was unprecedented human-caused environmental change in different parts of the world, produced by European expansion and by new technologies and state-building both in Europe and in other parts of the world. Pages 58-85 examine the evidence for a world-wide ‘little ice age’ and draw some conclusions about its impact on human societies.

W.

Woodworth, C. K., “Ocean and Steppe: Early Modern World Empires,” Journal of Early Modern History 11.6 (2007): 501-518.

An interesting piece as it puts together Empire, trade and ecology in early modern Eurasia.


Part D: Globalizing historical issues

Theme 9: The body

A.

Adams, Rachel, Sideshow U.S.A. Freaks in the American Cultural Imagination (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001).

Altman, Dennis, Global Sex (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000).

Arnold, D., Colonizing the Body: State Medicine and Epidemic Disease in Nineteenth-Century India (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1993).

B.

Bancel, Nicolas, Human Zoos: From the Hottentot Venus to Reality Shows (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2009).

Bashford, A., “Global Biopolitics and the History of World Health,” History of the Human Sciences 91.1 (2006): 67–88.

Bayly, C. A., ‘From Archaic Globalization to International Networks, circa 1600–2000’, in Interactions: Transregional Perspectives on World History, ed. Jerry Bentley, Renate Bridenthal and Anand Yang, Honolulu, 2005.

Argues for the existence of a period of archaic globalization that was underpinned by three developments: universalizing kingship, the expansion of cosmic religions and understandings of bodily health. An innovative analysis of early forms of global networks.

Bruckner, Sierra, “Voelkerschauen, Spectacles of (Human) Nature: Commercial Ethnography between Leisure, Learning, and Schaulust,” in Matti Bunzl and Glenn Penny, eds., Worldly Provincialism: German Anthropology in the Age of Empire (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002).

Bynum, William and Kalof, Linda, A Cultural History of the Human Body, Vol. 6 (Oxford; New York: Berg, 2010).

C.

Caplan, Jane, ed., Written on the Body: The Tattoo in European and American History (Princeton: New Jersey, 2000).

D.

Dreesbach, Anne, Colonial Exhibitions, Voelkerschauen, and the Display of the Other, in: http://www.ieg-ego.eu/en/threads/models-and-stereotypes/the-wild-and-the-civilized/anne-dreesbach-colonial-exhibitions-voelkerschauen-and-the-display-of-the-other, published 2012-05-03.

Durbach, Nadja, Spectacle of Deformity: Freak Shows and Modern British Culture (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010).

G.

Garland Thomson, Rosemary, Freakery: Cultural Spectacles of the Extraordinary Body (New York: New York University Press, 1996).

Gilman, Sander, Making the Body Beautiful: A Cultural History of Aesthetic Surgery (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999).

H.

Haiken, Elizabeth, Venus Envy. A History of Cosmetic Surgery (Baltimore; London: Johns Hopkins University, 1997).

Hau, Michael, The Cult of Health and Beauty in Germany: A Social History, 1890-1930 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003).

K.

Kuriyama, Shigehisa, The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine (New York: Zone, 2002).

L.

Lemire, Beverly, “Fashioning Global Trade: Indian Textiles, Gender Meanings and European Consumers, 1500-1800,” in Giorgio Riello and Tirthankar Roy, eds., How India Clothed the World: The World of South Asian Textiles, 1500-1850 (Leiden: Brill, 2009)

N.

Najmabadi, Afsaneh, Women with Mustaches and Men without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties in Iranian Modernity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005).

P.

Pick, Daniel, Faces of Degeneration: A European Disorder, c. 1848-1918 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989).

Q.

Qureshi, Sadiah, Peoples on Parade. Exhibitions, Empire, and Anthropology in Nineteenth Century Britain (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).

R.

Riley, James C., Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001): 32-57.

Chronology, geography, and context of the modern rise in life expectancy.

S.

Smith, Mark M., Sensing the Past. Seeing, Hearing, Smelling, Tasting, and Touching in History (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007).

Pages 59-74 are on smell: like the other chapters, introduces the way the senses have been used in different societies to mark class and race.

Stoler, Ann Laura, Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Power: Race and the Intimate in Colonial Rule (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002).

Theme 10: Multinational companies

C.

Carlos, Ann and Nicholas, Stephen, “Joint Stock Chartered Trading Companies,” Journal of Economic History 56 (1996): 916-25.

Cassis, Youssef, “Big Business,” in Geoffrey Jones and Jonathan Zeitlin, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Business History (New York, 2008), pp. 171-193.

Chaudhuri, K.N., Trade and Civilization in the Indian Ocean, chaps. 3, 4

Cheong, Wang Eang, Hong Merchants of Canton: Chinese Merchants in Sino-Western Trade, 1684-1798 (Richmond, 1997)

D.

De Vries, Jan, ‘The Limits of Globalization in the Early Modern World’, Economic History Review, 63, 3 (2010).

F.

Farrington, Anthony, Trading Places: The East India Company and Asia 1600-1834 (London, 2002).

Furber, Holden, Rival Empires of Trade in the Orient (1970), reprinted in S. Subrahmanyam, Maritime India, 2004, chap. 3.

G.

Gill, Conrad, Merchants and Mariners in the Eighteenth Century (London, 1961)

J.

Jones, Geoffrey, Multinationals and Global Capitalism from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Century (Oxford, 2010).

A survey of the importance of corporations in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This includes a series of useful examples.

Jones, Geoffrey, “Globalization,” in Geoffrey Jones and Jonathan Zeitlin, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Business History (New York, 2008), pp. 141-168.

A short overview of the relationship between multinationals and globalisation.

K.

Keller, William and Pauly, Louis, “Globalization at Bay,” Current History (November 1997), 370-376.

Attests that multinational corporations are shaped by national political structures and serve primarily national interests, and therefore are not ‘globalized’.

M.

Marshall, Peter J., ‘The English in Asia to 1700’ in Nicholas Canny ed., The Oxford History of the British Empire: the Origins of Empire (Oxford, 19998), chap. 12, pp. 264-285

Marshall, Peter J., ‘The British in Asia: Trade to Dominion, 1700-1765, in P.J. Marshall, ed., The Oxford History of the British Empire: the Eighteenth Century (Oxford, 1998), chap. 22, pp. 487-50.

Mazlish, Bruce and Morss, Elliott R., “A Global Elite?,” in Alfred D. Chandler Jr and Bruce Mazlish, eds., Leviathans: Multinational Corporations and the New Global History (Cambridge:, 2005), pp. 167-186.

A critical analysis of how much today’s global elites are generated by business and the main ways in which they reproduce themselves and defend their own interests.

Micklethwaith, John and Woolridge, Adrian, The Company: A Short History of a Revolutionary Idea (New York, 2005).

A popular account of the rise of multinationals from the East India Companies, to the rise of limited liability to present-day large corporations

Moore, Karl and Lewis, David, Birth of the multinational: 2000 years of ancient business history from Ashur to Augustus (Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press, 1999).

A history of the multinational and the world economy from 2000 B.C. to 100 A.D.

T.

Tracy, James B., The Rise of Merchant Empires (Cambridge, 1991).

W.

Wilkins, Mira, “The Historical Development of Multinational Enterprise to 1930: Discontinuities and Continuities,” in Bruce Mazlish and Akira Iriye, eds., The Global History Reader (London, 2005), pp. 79-90.

The analysis of the rise of corporations before the Great Depression and how different this phenomenon was from today’s multinationals.

Theme 11: Maps

A.

Akerman, James R., ed., The Imperial Map: Cartography and the Mastery of Empire (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009).

Includes articles on Russian, Chinese, Portuguese, British and French use of maps to consolidate territory.

B.

Brook, Timothy, Vermeer’s Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2008)

A very accessible book that examines several objects in famous Vermeer paintings that could only have been there for the fact of global trade networks between SE Asia/China/Japan/North America and the Netherlands/Europe.

E.

Elliot, John, The Old World and the New (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1970).

A now classic study of how traditional European assumptions about geography, theology, history and the nature of man were challenged by the encounter with new peoples and lands.

H.

Hostetler, Laura, Qing Colonial Enterprise: Ethnography and Cartography in Early Modern China (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001).

K.

Kern, Stephen, The Culture of Time and Space, 1880-1914 (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1983).

(Chapter on Distance.)

L.

Lewis, Martin W., and Wigen, Karen E., The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997).

The most useful text on how scholars have traditionally conceptualised the globe, and new theories on how to approach its study. Offers overviews of central ideas such as Toynbee’s civilizations approach, Wallerstein’s World Systems theory, and other concepts of global connections.

Examines the logic behind standard geographical labels. Defines metageography as the “set of spatial structures through which people order their knowledge of the world” and sets out to deconstruct these. Proposes a new framework, world regions, for dividing the globe.

Lestringant, Frank, Mapping the Renaissance World (Berkeley CA: California University Press, 1994).

Focuses on the historical and cultural specificity of the geographical imagination of the 16th century map maker and traveller, André Thevet.

S.

Schwartz, Stuart, ed., Implicit Understandings: Observing, Reporting and Reflecting on the Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994).


One of the best collections of essays on cross-cultural encounters and interactions. Challenging past Eurocentric historiography on approaching other cultures, looks at various aspects such as material culture, cartography, and ethnography in the creation of cross-cultural perceptions and representations across a broad geographical range, taking a two-way perspective on the impact of encounters.

Shih, Shu-mei, Visuality and Identity: Sinophone Articulations across the Pacific (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007).

Short, John, Making Space, Revisioning the World 1475-1600 (Syracuse NY: Syracuse University Press, 2004).

Examines the ways in which modern notions of space were developed in the 16th century through new techniques of spatial surveillance. Short emphasizes the role of occult practices in the emergence of new spatial sciences and suggests that cartographic literacy was encouraged by the increasing importance of agriculture as a commodity and the rising price of land.

W.

Winichakul, Thongchai, Siam Mapped: A History of the Geo-Body of a Nation (Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1994).