Welcome to Monash Arts Events

ARC Centre of Excellence (CABAH) Workshop
Room E561, 5th Floor, East Wing, Menzies Building, Building 11
Event Date: Wed 26 Jul

ARC Centre of Excellence (CABAH) Workshop

You are invited to a special workshop about the new ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH), an innovative, interdisciplinary research program to track the natural and human history of Australia.

Professor Lynette Russell, Associate Professor Bruno David and Professor Ian McNiven, of the Monash node of will discuss the aims and focus of this 7 year project and profile opportunities for researchers across the Faculty, and the University to be involved in its programs.

Date: Wednesday 26 July 2017
Time: 12pm - 2pm
Room: E561, (Menzies Building) 20 Chancellors Walk, Monash University, Clayton Campus
RSVP: Email vanessa.fleming-baillie@monash.edu by Monday 24 July

This Centre of Excellence links researchers from science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) disciplines – including Earth and climate sciences, ecology and genetics – with scholars from humanities, arts and social sciences (HASS) disciplines such as archaeology and Indigenous and museum studies. CABAH will bring the extraordinary environmental and human history of Australia to the public through a comprehensive program of education, outreach and science communication events for schools, museums, science festivals and a range of digital media. 

CABAH is funded by a $33.75 million grant from the ARC, $1 million from the NSW Government, and $11 million from participating universities, museums, and other organisations. These will support around 40 new research positions and more than 50 new research students over the 7-year life of the Centre. 

Please RSVP via email by Monday 24 July:  vanessa.fleming-baillie@monash.edu 

Media, Film and Journalism - Diversity in the TV Writers Room - Elise McCredie, Tony Briggs, Bruce Gladwin and Sonia Teuben
MADA Ground Floor Theatre G104, Caulfield Campus
Event Date: Wed 26 Jul

Presented as part of the 'TV Bites' Media Industry Experts Panel Discussion Series

Join award-winning screenwriters and directors discussing diversity in current TV productions both on-screen and behind-the-scenes. How is diversity represented in TV writers rooms, and why is this space so critical?

Elise McCredie is an award-winning film and TV director and screenwriter. She is writer and co-creator of TV series 'Nowhere Boys', 'Sunshine' and 'Stateless'. She is currently working on her original crime mystery series 'Overflow' produced by Claudia Karvan and the new season of 'Jack Irish.'

Tony Briggs is an actor, writer and producer. Briggs wrote the Helpmann Award winning play 'The Sapphires' and adapted it for the 2012 film. His acting credits include 'Bran Nue Dae', 'Cleverman', 'The Slap', 'Redfern Now', and 'Neighbours'. In 2017, he was involved in writing and creating TV series 'The Warriors'. 

Bruce Gladwin is Artistic Director of Back to Back Theatre, a company with an ensemble of actors who identify as having intellectual disabilities. In 2015, Gladwin won the Australia Council Award for Outstanding Achievement in Theatre. Currently, the company is working on TV production 'Oddlands' with Matchbox Pictures.

Sonia Teuben is a key member of the Back to Back Theatre ensemble, which she joined in 1993. In 1997, Sonia was a semi-finalist in the Australian Young Achievers Award and in 2007, she co-devised 'Small Metal Objects', which premiered at Flinders Street Station in 2004 as part of the Melbourne International Arts Festival.

Send RSVP to Tessa.Dwyer@monash.edu by Tuesday 25th July 2017.

For further information please contact Tessa Dwyer on 0399034633.

 

 

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music - Book Launch - Gay Breyley
Room E561 Menzies Building 11
Event Date: Thu 27 Jul

Iranian Music and Popular Entertainment: From Motrebi to Losanjelesi and Beyond

Launch of Iranian Music and Popular Entertainment: From Motrebi to Losanjelsi and Beyond, by Gay Breyley and Sasan Fatema.

Gay Breyley is a senior adjunct research fellow, Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music.

For further information, please contact Adrian McNeil on 50785.

ACJC - Public Lecture - Cultural Resistance in the Warsaw Ghetto: The Ringelblum Archive
H1.16 Ground Floor, Building H
Event Date: Thu 27 Jul

Presented by Professor Samuel Kassow, the ACJC 2017 Kronhill Visiting Scholar and Charles H.Northam Professor of History at Trinity College

During World War II Jews resisted not only with guns but also with pen and paper. Even in the face of death they left "time capsules" full of documents that they buried under the rubble of ghettos and death camps. The Ringelblum archive in the Warsaw Ghetto buried thousands of documents. But of the 60 people who worked on this national mission, only three survived. This will be their story.

Please RSVP to 
acjc@monash.edu

For further information, please contact
Amy Benjamin
990 35016

ACJC - Book Launch of THIRTY DAYS: A JOURNEY TO THE END OF LOVE
Building H Room 116, Monash University Caulfield Campus
Event Date: Sun 30 Jul

Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation (ACJC)

Mark Baker's Book launch of THIRTY DAYS: A JOURNEY TO THE END OF LOVE

Keynote Speaker: Mark Baker 

Book launch of THIRTY DAYS: A JOURNEY TO THE END OF LOVE, Mark Raphael Baker's memoir about grief, marriage and the death of his wife, Kerryn; and of the new 20th-anniversary edition of THE FIFTIETH GATE: A JOURNEY THROUGH MEMORY.

Please RSVP by email to: rsvp@textpublishing.com.au

For further information please contact:
Helen: 9903 5016

Centre for Theatre and Performance - The Book of Revelations - Dr Alison Richards
Fortyfive Downstairs
Event Date: Sun 30 Jul

A new multidisciplinary work by Adjunct Senior Lecturer Dr Alison Richards

I woke up this morning and it's this afternoon already ...' in Ada's world, nothing is quite the same as it was. Objects shift, time bends and angels sing, in a journey with no beginning, moving towards an unseen end. 

The Book of Revelations, written and performed by CTP Adjunct Senior Lecturer Alison Richards, directed by Nancy Black and presented by Black Hole Theatre, is a performance installation, using artistic and technological innovation to open new perspectives on the disorienting experiences of people with dementia and other mental illnesses.

The project is supported by Alzheimer's Australia Vic, Cultural Infusion Inc, and has received funding through the Government of Australia's Catalyst program.

The Book of Revelations will have its premiere theatre season at 45 Downstairs, 45 Flinders Lane Melbourne, from July 19 -30 2017. 

Dr Alison Richards

Dr Alison Richards is a distinguished theatre maker and researcher with a particular interest in voice and cross-disciplinary performance. Alison is an Adjunct Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Theatre and Performance at Monash University, Artistic Associate and Chair of Black Hole Theatre,  and a Life Member of Footscray Community Arts Centre, Theatre Works St Kilda and ADSA, the Australasian Theatre, Drama and Performance Studies Association. Alison's recent work as a writer, performer, dramaturg and director includes Instability Strip (2010), Miss Hewitt's Shenanigans (2011), the community-based Preserves Project (2012-13), Hey Joe! (2013-14) and What Is A Poem Worth? (2015-17). Alison has authored or devised more than 30 original works for performance and has written extensively on contemporary theatre practice and Performance as Research, with articles and book chapters in scholarly and general publications in Australia and internationally.

Please send RSVP via event website:

http://fortyfivedownstairs.com/wp2016/event/the-book-of-revelations/

MFJ - Public Service Media and the future of digital content
Building S, Level 9 Monash University Caulfield Campus
Event Date: Mon 31 Jul

Media Matters Seminar Series 2017

Welcome to Media Matters, the School of Media, Film and Journalism seminar series. Media increasingly shapes cultures, industries, markets and values in different ways, in a time when understandings of news, media entertainment and media work experience profound shifts. Media Matters is a forum designed to explore contemporary debates and challenges of current media landscapes, employing combinations of media disciplines, expertise and industries.

Public Service Media and the future of digital content

Speakers:
Chair: Associate Professor Fay Anderson (MFJ)
Dr Colleen Murrell (MFJ)
Associate Professor Mia Lindgren (MFJ)
Gavan Morris (ABC, News Division)

A series of media redundancies, particularly those at Fairfax publications, has prompted the setting up of a Senate committee to examine the future of ‘public interest journalism’ in Australia. At the ABC 200 jobs are scheduled to disappear by June. Meanwhile, Managing Director Michelle Guthrie has said that an injection of funds up to $15 million per annum will finance ‘more reporters and content makers, better tools and expanded digital and video output’. Guthrie also spoke about increasing ‘digital storytelling in news’ and claimed that ABC Regional would recruit up to ‘80 new content roles’ before September 2018.

So, what is this exciting new ‘digital content’ and will it be driven by quality or quantity? The ABC’s Director of News, Gaven Morris, is joining us to discuss the challenge of newsgathering in these financially straitened, but digitally interesting times. Colleen Murrell will talk about similar challenges in public service media elsewhere – namely the UK and Canada. Mia Lindgren will look at how podcasting is blurring the lines between journalism and program content, as long-form journalism evolves in public service radio.

Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics - The Witness & the Archive Digitising Memories of Childhood Abuse in Ireland - Associate Professor Emilie Pine
Building H, Room 7.84, Caulfield Campus
Event Date: Tue 01 Aug

Opening up the 2009 Ryan Report on institutional child abuse in Ireland, using approaches such as text analytics and audio guide mobile apps

In this lecture, Emilie Pine will consider the ways that digital approaches to archives can tell new stories and act as a belated form of witnessing the history of Ireland. The lecture focuses on the University College Dublin project Industrial Memories, which digitally re-reads the 2009 Ryan Report on institutional child abuse in Ireland, using approaches such as text analytics and audio guide mobile apps to open up the archive. This document is one of the most important publications in the history of the Irish state. It is also one of the least read. Pine considers how digital approaches might change that.

Associate Professor Emilie Pine (University College Dublin)

Emilie Pine is Associate Professor in Modern Drama at the School of English, Drama and Film, University College Dublin. Emilie is Editor of the Irish University Review and Director of the Irish Memory Studies Network (irishmemorystudies.com). Emilie is PI for Industrial Memories (2015-18) a New Horizons Irish Research Council project on the history of institutional child abuse in Ireland. Emilie has published widely on Irish theatre, culture and memory studies - her book The Politics of Irish Memory was published by Palgrave (2011), her most recent work is the edited volume The Body in Pain in Irish Culture (Palgrave, 2016), and she is currently completing a book on memory in international performance, Witnessing in World Theatre.

Please RSVP via the website: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/the-witness-the-archive-digitising-memories-of-childhood-abuse-in-ireland-tickets-35621347409

For further information, please contact Dr Joanne Evans (FIT) or Dr Simon Musgrave (Arts) on 99032177.

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music - Music Research Seminars - Joel Crotty
Room E561 Menzies Building 11
Event Date: Thu 03 Aug

Timbre as the focus of application to delineate form in Livia Teodorescu-Ciocanea's Endeavour Bells for solo piano (2008)

 

ACJC - Vilna: The Jerusalem of Lithuania
H1.16 Ground Floor, Building H
Event Date: Thu 03 Aug

Presented by Professor Samuel Kassow

Vilna, the "Jerusalem of Lithuania" was a very special city. No other Jewish community in Eastern Europe inspired so many poems and stories. Vilna was the home of the great Vilna Goen but it also was the birthplace of the Jewish Socialist Bund. It was also the world capital of an imaginary country called "Yiddishland." Religion and worldliness, Hebrew and Yiddish, tradition and modernity, all came together in this lovely, Jewish city.

For further information, please contact
Amy Benjamin
990 35016

 

Monash Asia Institute - MAI Screen Studies - Niharika Popli
Arts- S802 Caulfield Campus
Event Date: Fri 04 Aug

Rasan Piya

Presented by Niharika Popli

Rasan Piya is a documentary on the life of renowned Hindustani classical vocalist, Ustad Abdul Rashid Khan, who represented the 16th generation of Miyan Tansen’s lineage. He continued not just to compose, but also to teach, travel and perform across all of India till he passed away on 18th February 2016 at the age of 107 years.

This is the story of an extraordinary musician, poet and teacher; of someone who has not only preserved but also added much to an ancient Indian art form; of a brave man who overcame his physical limitations to create beautiful music and inspire a whole generation of musicians and music lovers.

The film explores the various influences that have shaped his life and music, a life steeped in the rich culture of Awadh. It also offers a commentary on the change that art in India has witnessed with the decline of the riyasats (kingdoms) and the patronage they offered. Lastly, the film attempts to draw one towards our ancient guru shishya parampara, (traditional teacher-student relationship) as preserved and practised by one its most revered exponents.

Writer and director, Niharika Popli, graduated in Engineering from the University of Delhi in 2010. She then worked with a children’s NGO in Delhi, directing plays, writing and telling stories, and teaching. A chance encounter with Ustad Abdul Rashid Khan at a SPIC-MACAY concert in 2007 moved Niharika tremendously. The purity of his music and his zest for life inspired her to make her first feature length documentary Rasan Piya. The documentary received the Special Jury Mention at Mumbai International Film Festival 2016.

Send RSVPs to Mai-enquiries@monash.edu by 31st July 2017.

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music - Music Research Seminar -Lalita du Perron
Room E561, 5th Floor, East Wing, Menzies Building, Building 11
Event Date: Thu 10 Aug

Gods will be gods and men will be men: Krishna, courtesans, and coercion

In her earlier work on the song texts of Hindustani music, Lalita du Perron explored how language is manipulated to suit political agendas, and how female performers are written out of musical history. In this presentation, Du Perron will look at the way stories about the god Krishna as they live in the texts of Hindustani music were reframed in the course of the 20th century to give the oft-erotic courtesan songs of the late 19th and early 20th centuries the required religious sanction to bring them into the bourgeois nationalist fold. Ironically, the very mythology of Krishna - as it lives in North Indian lore - is also used as a justification for the sexual harrassment that many women in North India and elsewhere endure under the infantilised guise of “eve-teasing”. Krishna’s divinity is emphasised in both musical and sexual harrassment narratives. In the process of this deification, the voices of women - be they the courtesans of the colonial era or modern-day women in North India - are silenced and invalidated.

Lalita du Perron

Lalita du Perron has been the Associate Director of the Center for South Asia at the University of Wisconsin-Madison since 2009. She received her PhD from the Department of the Languages and Literatures of South Asia at SOAS (University of London) in 2000.

For further information, please contact Adrian McNeil on 50785.

ACJC - Public Lecture - Warsaw: The Jewish Metropolis
H1.16 Ground Floor, Building H
Event Date: Thu 10 Aug

Presented by Professor Samuel Kassow, the ACJC 2017 Kronhill Visiting Scholar and Charles H.Northam Professor of History at Trinity College

The story of Jewish Warsaw before the war is a fascinating saga of the rise of a Jewish metropolis. In just a few decades Warsaw became the biggest Jewish community in Europe. It was a mosaic of different Jewish tribes: Litvaks, Hasidim, Jews from Galicia. It was a magnet that attracted Jewish talent and wealth. During the 20th century Warsaw became one of the most important centers of the Jewish press, of Yiddish theater and of Jewish publishing

For further information, please contact
Amy Benjamin
990 35016

ACJC - Public Lecture - Machine Guns and Orphans: Soviet Yiddish Music of World War II
H1.16 Ground Floor, Building H
Event Date: Wed 16 Aug

Presented by Professor Anna Shternshis, Associate Professor of Yiddish studies and director of the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto

During World War II, a group of committed ethnomusicologists, led by Moisei Beregovsky, collected thousands of Yiddish songs from Soviet Jews living through the Holocaust, surviving in the Soviet Central Asia or fighting in the Red Army. The plan was to publish a book documenting how Jewish folklore made sense of the war. But the collection was lost, and only recently surfaced in Ukraine. The lecture discusses these treasures and suggests how these materials change our perception of the history of World War II and the Holocaust.

For further information, please contact
Amy Benjamin
9903 5016

Translating Worlds: Migration, Memory and Culture
S901 Monash University
Event Date: Thu 17 Aug - Fri 18 Aug

CALL FOR PAPERS

This international and interdisciplinary symposium explores the relations between migration, memory and translation. Bringing together humanities researchers from fields including memory studies, modern languages and literary, cultural and media studies and ranging across Europe, Australia and beyond it will open up discussion of themes including:
 

  • How memories of lost homes act as aids or hindrances to homemaking in new worlds;
  • How cultural memories are translated in new cultural worlds;
  • Blocks and facilitators of translation – the cultural practices and processes that aid and disable translation;
  • Migration, affect, memory and translation;
  • Mediation and re-mediation – media and remembering in new worlds;
  • Migration, translation and the transcultural invited international speakers include  Alison Ribeiro de Menezes (Professor, Hispanic Studies, Warwick University).

Abstracts for papers (ca. 250 words) should be submitted to both organisers Professor Susannah Radstone (SOPHIS, Monash University and University of South Australia) Susannah.Radstone@monash.edu; and Professor Rita Wilson (School of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, Monash University) Rita.Wilson@monash.edu  by 15 May 2017.

Please include a biographical statement of no more than 100 words. Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes. Audiovisual facilities will be available.

It is anticipated that symposium papers will be published in a relevant journal.

This symposium is co-hosted by the University of South Australia’s Hawke EU Centre for Mobilities, Migrations and Cultural Transformations and the Monash-Warwick Migration, Identity and Translation Network.

Register here: http://events.arts.monash.edu/TranslatingWorlds

For Further Information contact: Susannah Radstone  9903 4928

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music - Music Research Seminar - Rob Stove
Room E561, 5th Floor, East Wing, Menzies Building, Building 11
Event Date: Thu 17 Aug

Standford's War: Organ Music and the Irish Question, 1916-1918

During World War I, Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (all his symphonies and most of his big choral works being by this stage behind him) produced five organ sonatas, which in many respects are the British equivalent to Charles-Marie Widor’s organ symphonies. (Widor is in fact the dedicatee of one of them, the Sonata Eroica.) Today’s talk chiefly concerns the Sonata Celtica, which Stanford wrote in the aftermath of modern Irish history’s single most dramatic event: the 1916 Easter Rising and its suppression. The tug of divided loyalties which Stanford felt over this uprising, as an outsider twice over – by birth a Protestant in Catholic Dublin, by adoption an Irishman in London and Cambridge – may be imagined; but scarcely any commentators on Stanford have bothered with connecting the Sonata Celtica to the fratricidal passions that then raged on Irish soil, and that after Ireland’s independence would culminate in a hid eous civil war. Nonetheless, the clues are there, not least the finale’s inspired use of the heroic Irish hymn-tune St Patrick’s Breastplate.

Rob Stove

R. J. (Rob) Stove, born in Sydney but Melbourne-resident since 2001, is the author of César Franck: His Life and Times (Scarecrow Press, Lanham, Maryland, 2012). Editor of the quarterly magazine Organ Australia 2011-2013, he has been since 2012 an Adjunct Research Affiliate at the Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music, where he is currently finishing his honours degree in musicology, his thesis being on Stanford’s organ output. A regular organist at Saint Aloysius’s, Caulfield, from 2005 to 2013, he began work this year as organist-in-chief at St Joseph’s, Chelsea.

For further information, please contact Adrian McNeil on 50785.

School of Social Sciences - Sustainable Futures and the importance of Gender - Professor Margaret Alston, Janelle Weissman, Dr Yolande Strengers
State Library of Victoria/Village Roadshow Theatrette/Entry 3
Event Date: Thu 17 Aug

Centre for Women’s Studies  & Gender Research, Sociology Public Lecture 2017

The 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals identify gender equality as a key goal for sustainable futures. This panel of experts examines the importance of gender, globally, nationally and locally, as we develop social and political structures to achieve long term sustainability. The panellists interrogate the critical role of gender interventions as personal, communal and global.

Presenters: 

Professor Margaret Alston
OAM, Monash University

Janelle Weissman
Executive Director
UN Women National Committee Australia

Dr Yolande Strengers
Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow
Centre for Urban Research, RMIT

Moderator:

Associate Professor Jo Lindsay -Sociology, Monash University

Location is Village Roadshow Theatrette
328 Swanston St, Melbourne
Entry 3 via La Trobe Street

For additional information visit http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/sociology/ or contact  contact Associate Professor Jo Lindsay on 99052425.

School of Social Sciences - What can we learn from Brexit about democracy and international negotiations? - Professor Robert Thomson
State Library of Victoria
Event Date: Thu 17 Aug

What can we learn from Brexit about democracy and international negotiations?

Presented by Professor Robert Thomson

The United Kingdom’s momentous decision to leave the European Union and the events
following this decision have profound implications for understanding both democracy and
international negotiations far beyond Europe. The UK Conservatives promised a referendum on the UK’s membership of the EU in their 2015 election manifesto. The Brexit referendum of 2016, however, is often seen as an example of a more general rise in populism across many established democracies. This raises important questions for democratic representation. What distinguishes populism from normal politics? How likely are politicians in general to keep the promises they make to voters, and is promise-keeping a good thing? Following the referendum result, the ongoing negotiations on the terms under which the UK will leave the EU are among the most complex international negotiations ever conducted, and some observers say they are doomed to fail. The lecture will discuss some of the main issues on the agenda, the positions taken and the people involved. We will consider the prospects for agreement and lessons for negotiators in other settings. The lecture will draw on recent observations of the Brexit process, and relevant political science research on democracy and negotiations.

Robert Thomson is Professor of Politics and Head of the School of Social Sciences at Monash University. He moved to Melbourne in July 2017, having previously held positions at the University of Strathclyde in the UK, Trinity College Dublin, and at the Universities of Groningen and Utrecht in the Netherlands. His research focuses on democratic representation and negotiations at the national and international levels. His publications include the books The European Union Decides and Resolving Controversy in the European Union (both Cambridge University Press), and a series of articles and book
chapters on various aspects of national and international politics.

Please note that the lecture is from 6:30pm to 7:30pm with reception before.

Entry to the Village Roadshow Theatrette entry 3 is via La Trobe St.

For further information, please contact Maliha Dhaliwal on 99020176.

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music - Music Research Seminars - Professor John Whiteoak
Room E561, 5th Floor, East Wing, Menzies Building, Building 11
Event Date: Thu 24 Aug

“Strong and Sweet”: the So-Called ‘German Bands’ of Pre-WW1 Australia

The ‘German band’ concept remains integrally associated in the Australia public mind with German ethnicity though such things as the extroverted oom-pah music of present-day Oktoberfest and German or ‘Bavarian’-themed venues. But costumed ‘German bands’ were a prominent feature of Australian street and broader popular entertainment from the late 1840s until WW1. This seminar paper applies social, cultural and musicological ‘flesh and bones’ to what has more or less remained the ‘myth’ of the ubiquitous ‘German bands’ that often entertained and charmed while being perceived by others as a social, racial and sonic blot on the streetscapes and public spaces of pre-WW1 Australia.

Professor John Whiteoak

Adjunct Professor, John Whiteoak, produced the first monograph history of improvisation in Australia (1999) and was co-General Editor of the Currency Companion to Music and Dance in Australia (2003). His Tango Touch publication project (www.ausmdr.com) about Hispanic and Continental European influences on music and dance in Australia has, so far, produced 23 publications and a monograph nearing completion.

For further information, please contact Adrian McNeil on 50872.

MFJ - Gender matters in Australian TV
Building S, Level 9 Monash University Caulfield Campus
Event Date: Mon 28 Aug

Media Matters Seminar Series 2017

Welcome to Media Matters, the School of Media, Film and Journalism seminar series. Media increasingly shapes cultures, industries, markets and values in different ways, in a time when understandings of news, media entertainment and media work experience profound shifts. Media Matters is a forum designed to explore contemporary debates and challenges of current media landscapes, employing combinations of media disciplines, expertise and industries.

Gender matters in Australian TV

Speakers:
Chair:
Associate Professor Therese Davis (MFJ)
Amanda Lotz, Professor of Communication Studies and Screen Arts and Cultures (University of Michigan) 
Susie Cortez, Strategy & Operations Liaison (Screen Australia)
Claire Perkins, Senior Lecturer in Film and Screen Studies (MFJ)

Who is telling Australian stories on TV? And whose stories are being told? Are women adequately represented in key creative roles and positions of influence in the Australian screen industry? Why are women screen creatives faring better in television than film? How does this compare internationally?

The issue of gender bias in the screen industry is back on the agenda in Australia and internationally. Despite approaches by Screen Australia, state agencies and industry guilds over the years, the level of women’s participation in key sectors of this industry continues to track along at the low percentages we saw in the 1970s. A lot of us in film and media studies are asking why. We’re also shifting attention away from the big screen of feature filmmaking to the small screens of TV and online screen formats where women are participating at higher levels.

This panel will debate current trends, policy and strategies, including Screen Australia’s recent five point, 5-million-dollar strategic plan, Gender Matters. Panelists will also discuss these issues and initiatives affecting Australian women screen creatives in the international context of global TV. 

Social Sciences (SoSS) - 2017 HIV biopolitical materialities after effective treatment and prevention
N402, Menzies building, , Clayton Campus
Event Date: Wed 30 Aug

Professor Bronwen Lichtenstein, University of Alabama    

Dr Kiran Pienaar, Monash University

A recent news article (Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 10 July 2016) carried the headline, “AIDS epidemic no longer a public health issue in Australia, scientists say.” The ABC Online article made reference to the “miraculous” change in AIDS due to HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs) and depicted the pharmaceutical treatment as a “game changer allowing someone to live a long and healthy life.” Not explored is just who is this “someone,” a story-telling approach which glosses over questions of treatment access and the variability in individual responses to ARVs. Is the “someone” of a pharmaceutically-managed HIV pandemic idealised and normalised: a person with HIV infection and without AIDS, but otherwise undifferentiated? While our current situation might be the end of AIDS as a biomedical problem for many, the biopolitical challenges of HIV have taken on new form and force in the lives of people affected by the pandemic. In this seminar, scholars working on HIV in the United States, South Africa, and Australia share perspectives on HIV policy making and together address the question of what kinds of biopolitics and material possibilities come into being in end of AIDS discourse.

Run as part of the Health and Biofutures Focus Programme
Please contact Mark Davis for further details:
mark.davis@monash.edu

RSVP: mark.davis@monash.edu

ACJC - Public Lecture - When Golda Meir Danced Hora in the Jungle: The African Journey in Israeli Culture
H1.16 Ground Floor, Building H
Event Date: Wed 30 Aug

Presented by Professor Eitan Bar-Yosef, the ACJC 2017 Don and Sonia Marejn Visiting Scholar; Head of the Department of Foreign Literatures and Linguistics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

From the late 1950s to the early 1970s, thousands of Israeli experts were sent to Black Africa, offering the new postcolonial states assistance in a wide range of fields – while thousands of Africans travelled to Israel to participate in courses and workshops. Focusing on this fascinating yet overlooked episode in Israeli history—our "African adventure", as Golda Meir dubbed it—this lecture traces the complex role played by images of Africa in Israeli history and culture.

For further information, please contact
Amy Benjamin
9903 5016

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music - Music Research Seminar - Dr John Garzoli
Room E561, 5th Floor, East Wing, Menzies Building, Building 11
Event Date: Thu 31 Aug

Thai music theory, aesthetics and performance through a case study of a melody called 'Phayasok'

The presentation will describe aesthetic and structural elements of Thai music that place its  contents out of reach of Western originating theoretical models. In their place are analytical processes that illuminate Thai rather than European derived musical traits.

Dr John Garzoli

Dr John Garzoli is an adjunct research fellow, Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music.

For further information, please contact Adrian McNeil on 50785.

ACJC - Tales of Love and Darkness: Zionism, the British Empire and Colonial Nostalgia in the Work of Amos Oz
H1.16 Ground Floor, Building H
Event Date: Wed 06 Sep

Presented by Professor Eitan Bar-Yosef, the ACJC 2017 Don and Sonia Marejn Visiting Scholar; Head of the Department of Foreign Literatures and Linguistics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

As Exodus (both novel and film) reminds us, the Yishuv's campaign against British rule in Palestine has often been idealized as a period of bygone heroism and commitment. From the late 1960s, however, Israelis’ nostalgia for the Mandate has taken up a new direction, celebrating the period’s colonial romance and cosmopolitan aura. Focusing on the work of Israel’s most renowned author, Amos Oz, this lecture asks why some Israelis long for the presence of their former imperial rulers – and how this is connected to the effects of the 1967 War.

For further information, please contact
Amy Benjamin
990 35016

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music - Music Research Seminar - Ian Parsons
Room E561, 5th Floor, East Wing, Menzies Building, Building 11
Event Date: Thu 07 Sep

From Dasein to Jenseits: searching for meaning in Stockhausen's LICHT

Karlheinz Stockhausen's seven-part opera cycle LICHT is typically viewed in musicological and hermeneutic discourse as a work that depicts somewhat bizarre and esoteric theological concepts through serialist compositional methods. My research is examining those methods from a new perspective, drawing on the semiotic psychoanalytical concepts of Jacques Lacan, to demonstrate how LICHT can be understood as an intensely human drama that depicts ubiquitous human tensions. I examine how the musical nucleus of LICHT, its so-called 'Superformula', can be invested with personality and agency and that such an approach generates an intriguing new interpretation of this 20th- and 21st-Century operatic colossus.

Ian Parsons

Ian Parsons is a PhD candidate at Monash University, with an interest in the connections between music and other disciplines, particularly philosophy. His Honours research explored connections between Wittgenstein's language theories and various interpretations of Cornelius Cardew's Treatise. He is now researching the symbolism in Stockhausen's opera cycle LICHT.

For further information, please contact Adrian McNeil on 50785.