Visiting Scholars in Criminology

6The International Visiting Scholar in Criminology program at Monash University provides staff and students with the opportunity to collaborate with the global community of criminology academics.

Scholars deliver seminars as part of the International Visiting Scholar Lecture Series and also run formal and informal teaching sessions for postgraduate students.

This scheme enables the strengthening of research, writing and teaching collaborations.

Scholars deliver seminars as part of the International Visiting Scholar Lecture Seriescontribute to teaching sessions for undergraduate students and deliver Masterclasses for our postgraduates.

2016 Visiting Scholars

In 2016 we welcome Professor Clare McGlynn, Professor Walter Dekeseredy and Associate Professor Elizabeth Stanley

Clare McGlynn is a Professor of Law at Durham University in the United Kingdom and is an expert on laws relating to sexual violence and pornography. Her current research includes extreme pornography and image-based sexual abuse (‘revenge pornography’) and the use of restorative justice in cases of sexual violence Recent books include Rethinking Rape Law: International and Comparative Perspectives (2010) and Feminist Judgments: From Theory to Practice (2010). During her visit to Monash Criminology in February 2016, Professor McGlynn continued working on her collaborative international research project, Revenge Pornography: The Prevalence and Nature of Non-Consensual Imagery with Dr Asher Flynn (Monash Criminology), Dr Nicola Henry (La Trobe University), Dr Anastasia Powell (RMIT University), Professor Erika Rackley (University of Birmingham) and Professor Nicola Gavey (University of Auckland); presented as a keynote speaker at the More than Revenge: Addressing the Harms of Revenge Pornography National Roundtable Event hosted by Monash Criminology (in conjunction with La Trobe University and RMIT) at the Monash Law Chambers; presented a seminar as part of the Criminology Research Seminar Series, Kaleidoscopic Justice: Mapping the Dimensions of Justice for Survivors of Sexual Violence; and hosted a workshop with the Monash Criminology HDR students at their annual retreat, where she shared her experiences on the ways in which academic work can influence real-world change.

Walter S. DeKeseredy is Anna Deane Carlson Endowed Chair of Social Sciences, Director of the Research Centre on Violence, and Professor of Sociology at West Virginia University. He has published 22 books and over 160 scientific journal articles and book chapters on violence against women and other social problems. He is the recipient of many awards including the Critical Criminal Justice Scholar Award in 2014 from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences’ Section on Critical Criminal Justice and in 2015, the ASC’s Division on Victimology presented him with a Career Achievement Award. During his visit to Monash Criminology in February 2016, Professor DeKeseredy presented as a keynote speaker at the More than Revenge: Addressing the Harms of Revenge Pornography National Roundtable Event hosted by Monash Criminology (in conjunction with La Trobe University and RMIT) at the Monash Law Chambers; and launched Rape Justice: Beyond the Criminal Law (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) edited by Dr Anastasia Powell (RMIT University), Dr Nicola Henry (La Trobe University) and Dr Asher Flynn (Monash Criminology) at an event attended by a mix of legal and government department representatives from around Australia, victim advocates and support workers, researchers, research students and academics from national and international institutions.

 Elizabeth Stanley is an Associate Professor of Criminology and Rutherford Discovery Fellow at the Institute of Criminology, Victoria University Wellington. Her research interests and expertise lie in the areas of state crime, human rights, torture and transitional justice. She has undertaken research on truth commissions and international courts in South Africa, Chile and Timor-Leste, and has written on violatory detention practices in the UK, NZ and West Papua. She has just completed a monograph on the experiences of children victimized in children’s homes in New Zealand, and the legacy of victimization on their lives (The Road to Hell, Auckland University Press, 2016).  During her visit to Monash Criminology in May, Associate Professor Stanley will give two lectures to the Criminology Unit, ATS3462 – Global Crime and Justice. She will also give a seminar presentation, Child Victims of Human Rights Violations, at 2pm Wednesday 11 May, at Monash University Clayton, 20 Chancellors Walk (Menzies Building) Room N402. She will use the resources of the Border Crossing Observatory to begin new research on the detention and deportation of New Zealanders from Australia.