Chinese Language Study Abroad

We are happy to announce that the Chinese language study abroad program will begin at Shanghai International Studies University and at the University of International Business and Economics (Beijing) on 2 December 2013.

For detailed information, please visit:

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/lcl-study-abroad/chinese-intensive-language-program/

Further information

Monash student is world champion in Chinese Bridge for Foreign University Students Competition

Our student, Alistair Bayley, currently in Advanced Chinese 4 and Chinese Translation 2, won both the world champion and the champion of Oceania at the finals of 12th “Chinese Bridge” Chinese Language Proficiency Competition for Foreign University Students on 30 July. He has also been granted “The Star of Chinese language Learner” and 3 years full scholarship with a return airfare to study in China. Alistair was the first Australian student to won this world championship, following strong performances and awards won by other Monash students in this competition in the past years. 

The prestigious competition is an annual event held to promote the study of Chinese language by non-native speakers. It attracts the best Chinese language students in the world. During the past one month, 123 students from 77 countries participated in this competition and went through a range of language and culture tests, including written exams, artistic performances, speeches, Chinese cultural tour race, role-playing and performing Chinese comedy and traditional Chinese drama.

The finals were broadcast by a famous TV station in China, Hunan Satellite TV station and attracted a large number of viewers.

ChineseChess2

Further information

Monash Student Wins VIC Region Chinese Bridge Competition Once Again

Alistair Bayley plays the erhu in Chinese Bridge Competition.

 Monash advanced Chinese language student Alistair Bayley will travel to Changsha in Hunan Province, China in July 2013 to represent Victorian universities in the final stage of the Chinese Bridge Chinese Proficiency Competition for Foreign University Students.

Alistair Bayley received first place at the 12th Chinese Bridge competition (Victoria region) held on Saturday 11th May at Melbourne University, beating entrants from the University of Melbourne, Deakin University, La Trobe University and RMIT University. During the competition participants were required to deliver a speech in Chinese as well as present a Chinese artistic performance. Alistair presented a very hard tongue twister in Mandarin and accompanied himself on the erhu, a traditional Chinese musical instrument, while singing the Chinese folk song Moli Hua (Jasmine Blossom).

The Chinese Bridge competition is an annual event organised by the Chinese government to promote the study of Chinese by non-native speakers. If Alistair is successful in the final round in Changsha, where he will compete with students from across the world, he will receive a scholarship to study in China.

Alistair’s success in the competition was due in no small part to the dedicated coaching of the following Monash University Chinese Studies lecturers: Ms Hailan Paulsen, Mr Chunming Shan, Ms Candy Wang, Ms Hui Xu and Mr Zhihua Yao.

Further information

Chinese Government Scholarships for Australians to study in China

logoThe Scholarships program for 2013 – 2014 has recently been released to eligible students of Australian citizenship from Monash University.  Applications should be submitted to Ms Guo Xiaojuan, Education Counsellor, Consulate General of the People’s Republic of China in Melbourne, 14 Selborne Road, Toorak 3142.     Read on for further information.

Further information

Chinese Enrolment and Placement Testing

The Chinese Studies Program conducts diagnostic placement tests to ensure that new students who have studied Chinese before enrol at the level most appropriate for their current language proficiency. Students with no previous Chinese language background, students unable to read or write any Chinese or students who have completed at least three years of Chinese secondary education (in China, Hong Kong or Taiwan) are not required to take a placement test.

On your enrolment day:

  1. If you are an absolute beginner you may enrol without approval in Chinese Introductory 1 ATS1001.
  2. If you are unable to read or write Chinese but are able to speak and understand some form of Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese, Hokkien etc.) you should contact the unit coordinator to obtain authorisation to enrol in Chinese introductory for background speakers ATS1905/1906 (see below). You are not required to take the placement test.
  3. If you have completed IB or VCE L2 (Basic stream) Chinese Units 3/4 you may provisionally enrol in Chinese Intermediate 1 ATS2003. You are required to sit the placement test to confirm your entry level.
  4. If you have completed IB or VCE L2 (Advanced stream) or VCE L1 Chinese Units 3/4, or if you have studied Chinese overseas, you may provisionally enrol in Chinese Proficient 1 ATS2005. You are required to sit the placement test to confirm your entry level
  5. If you have completed VCE L1 Chinese Units 3/4 you may provisionally enrol in Chinese Advanced 3 ATS3009. You are required to sit the placement test to confirm your entry level.
  6. If you have completed at least three years of Chinese secondary education (in China, Hong Kong or Taiwan) you may enrol in Chinese advanced 5 or 6 or in Chinese translation unit. Please contact the unit coordinator for enrolment approval.

To complete the online questionnaire and placement test please go to:

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/chinese/chinese-placement-test/

The questionnaire and test function best in Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome browsers.

For further information you may contact any of the following Chinese Studies unit coordinators:

Chinese introductory 1 & 2 ATS1001/1002

Mr Scott Grant

Room S522, scott.grant@monash.edu, 9905 2950

Chinese introductory for background speakers ATS1905/1906

Dr Hui Huang

Room S517, hui.huang@monash.edu, 9905 2211

Chinese intermediate 1 & 2 ATS2003/2004

Dr Robert Irving

Room S513, robert.irving@monash.edu, 9905 2227

Chinese proficient 1 & 2 ATS2005/2006

Dr Lijun Bi

Room S528, lijun.bi@monash.edu 9905 8132

Chinese advanced 1 & 2 ATS3007/3008

Dr Hui Huang

Room S517, hui.huang@monash.edu, 9905 2211

Chinese advanced 3–6 ATS3009/10 and ATS3010/3011

Ms Hui Xu

Room S521A, hui.xu@monash.edu, 9905 5467

Chinese translation

Mr Chunming Shan

Room S515, chunming.shan@monash.edu, 9905 5365

Chinese translation

Ms Hailan Paulsen

Room S518, hailan.paulsen@monash.edu, 9905 8066

Chinese translation

Ms Candy Wang

Room S521, candy.wang@monash.edu, 9902 0212

OR
View online answers and submit an enquiry with ask.monash at https://my.monash.edu.au/askmonash/
Phone: +61 3 9902 6011 

New CEFR Alignment Website Launched: Innovation in Language Learning

The new CEFR Website homepage

The School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics at Monash has recently adopted the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) to align more closely with current industry and teaching standards.

To find out more about the CEFR at Monash, explore the CEFR in Australia, an international language framework Website. The site, which was launched this week, gives helpful background information about the CEFR itself and what the new competency levels will entail for students and educators.

The CEFR was developed through a process of scientific research and wide consultation, and provides a practical tool for setting clear standards that can be obtained at successive stages of learning. It also provides a framework for evaluating outcomes in an internationally comparable way.

Adoption of the CEFR will ensure that Monash graduates enjoy an education that is both universally relevant and universally transferrable.

Further information

Students and seniors connect

Students on an excursion to Melbournes Chinatown. Image courtesy of the Monash Photography Club

Victorian students are taking advantage of a unique opportunity to improve their foreign language skills through regular meetings with migrant seniors whose first language is Chinese, German or Spanish.

Now in its third year, the Connecting younger second language learners and older bilinguals program is led by Dr Marisa Cordella from Monash University’s School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics. Working withDr Hui Huang from the Faculty of Arts,Professor Colette Browning from Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Dr Cordella’s project connects Year 11 and 12 students with ‘language and cultural gurus’.

For more information about this programme, please see the full article and the project Website.

Further information

Honours Programme

Overview of Honours in Chinese

The Honours program in Chinese is a one-year full-time course or a part-time program over two years.

Full-time students complete 48 credit points over one year; part-time students do so over two years, with 24 points completed each year.

The program consists of 24 points of coursework and 24 points of research and thesis writing.

Eligibility

Honours is a competitive and challenging program and only students who have an adequate research proposal and demonstrated ability in previous studies will be accepted. Students must have a major in Chinese language or Chinese Studies or Chinese Translation and an average grade of 70 percent or better for four units (24 points), consisting of three third-year units and one second- or third-year unit.

The Honours program in Chinese is open to students from other universities. Monash students are highly recommended to complete ATS3747 Theory and Research in Asian Studies or a similar unit in research methodology in their second or third year of study in order to be able to work constructively over the summer period on a literature review and on initial research.

The Structure of the Program

See the Chinese Studies – Honours Area of Study handbook entry for information about the Chinese Studies course structure when undertaking an Honours degree of Bachelor of Arts.

The Research-Thesis Component

The thesis should present original research which examines issues relevant to understanding contemporary China, to the Chinese language or to China-Australia relations Students may also consider doing a translation project with critical commentary as their thesis component. For more information on the format of research and translation theses in our School please consult the School Honours page.

The Chinese Studies Program at Monash is staffed by academics with a wide range of research interests. Normally one of those staff will be appointed to supervise the Honours research. A list of staff members and their research interests is given below, and it is expected that students will locate their own supervisor in consultation with the Honours Coordinator.

Some of the areas investigated by Honours students in the past include:

  • Chinese politics and economics
  • Chinese society
  • Chinese language and literature
  • China’s international relations

Students are advised to select an area for research and to discuss their vision for the research with the Honours Coordinator and a potential supervisor before the summer break, so that background reading can be started before the first semester begins. Those planning to do research while in China will need to have a very good outline of their research and a clear plan before leaving Melbourne.

Scholarships

There are scholarships dedicated to Honours students in the Chinese Studies Program, aiming to support a research trip to China. Refer to the Monash Scholarships Office for more information. The School also offers travel grants and publication grants to Honours students, please consult the School Honours page.

Life after Honours

The Honours program is designed to prepare students both for further study and research at the postgraduate level and for employment in areas which involve on-going contact with Chinese and Chinese organizations. Many graduates find employment in China to be a useful way of extending further the skills and knowledge acquired during the Honours program.

Postgraduate programs offered at Monash which would be of particular interest to graduates with an Honours Degree in Chinese include the Masters in Applied Linguistics, the Masters in Interpreting and Translation, and the Masters in Asian Studies. Those who do exceptionally well in Honours may qualify to become a PhD candidate pursuing research in many fields of Chinese studies.

Why do Honours in Chinese?

  • to extend further one’s knowledge and skills relevant to working in China or other Chinese-speaking regions or in contact with persons having a Chinese background
  • to acquire a four-year degree, with advanced skills in research and report writing, skills which are highly valued in a variety of employment situations
  • to gain a greater appreciation for China and a fuller sense of the Chinese cultural context
  • to expand expertise in the discipline area in which research is conducted
  • to gain entry into various postgraduate programs.

Members of staff in the Chinese Program and areas in which they supervise

Note: There are many other areas in which students have done research for their Honours thesis. If an area of interest does not appear below, please contact the Honours Coordinator for further advice. (Further information about staff is available on their staff profile pages.)

  • Prof. Bruce Jacob
    Taiwan’s democratic transition; Taiwan nationalism; Cross-Straits (China-Taiwan) relations; history of Taiwan; Democratization in Taiwan and the East Asian region; Modern China: culture, politics and society
  • A/Prof. Gloria Davies
    Chinese critical inquiry, Chinese intellectual history and culture; Chinese literary studies from the late nineteenth century to the present; Contemporary History of the People’s Republic of China; Cyberdissent in the Chinese-speaking world; Modern China: culture, politics and society
  • Dr. Lijian Hong
    Chinese intellectual history and culture; Contemporary History of the People’s Republic of China; Chinese as an international language: Policy; Modern China: culture, politics and society
  • Dr. Warren Sun
    Chinese elite politics; Chinese intellectual history and culture; Contemporary History of the People’s Republic of China; Modern China: culture, politics and society
  • Dr. Robert Irving
    Modern Chinese literature and politics; Modern Chinese grammar and syntax
  • Dr. Hui Huang
    Second language acquisition; teaching Chinese as a second/heritage language; Second language teaching pedagogy and technology; Language curriculum development and learner needs analysis; Cross-cultural communication and language teaching;

Further information

Further information about Honours is available from the School’s Honours page.

If you would like more information on Honours in Chinese, contact:

Dr Hui Huang
Chinese studies, room CL_11/W519
School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics
Email: hui.huang@monash.edu

Or

Dr Shani Tobias
Japanese studies, room CL_11/W429
School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics
Email: shani.tobias@monash.edu

For general information on Honours in the Faculty of Arts:
http://www.arts.monash.edu.au/current/honours/

Further information

  • Postgraduate Courses in Chinese Studies

    Further information is available on the School’s Graduate Studies (Research) and Postgraduate/graduate Coursework pages. Introduction China, as the world’s…

Postgraduate Courses in Chinese Studies

Further information is available on the School’s Graduate Studies (Research) and Postgraduate/graduate Coursework pages.

Introduction

China, as the world’s longest continuous civilisation, provides rich sources as well as case studies for wide varieties of research in the humanities and social sciences. The study of China covers a diverse range of research areas and uses several disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches. Chinese Studies at Monash focus on cultural and political issues in 19th and 20th century China (including Taiwan), with specific emphases on the use of both Chinese and Western sources. Staff also engage in international collaborative research. There is an emphasis on the critical awareness of Sinology and Chinese studies as Western research enterprises in order to redress existing imbalances in China research approaches.

Further information

  • Honours Programme

    Overview of Honours in Chinese The Honours program in Chinese is a one-year full-time course…

Chinese Undergraduate Studies

Once a student’s place is determined, he or she will progress through the language units in a designated stream. At each level, students have the alternative to enrol in an intensive in-country program as part of their stream component (see ‘Intensive In-Country Chinese Program’ below).

In addition to the compulsory language units, students may also enrol in a number of electives, including Chinese Media Studies, Chinese Professional Language Internship, Understanding Modern and Contemporary China, and Chinese Translationas part of their major in Chinese.

Further information about compulsory and elective units that can count towards a Chinese langauge sequence can be found in the Chinese language handbook entry.

Further information

School-wide units

The School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics expects students majoring in a language to take (at least) one school-wide elective as part of their major sequence. The school-wide electives are listed below. Some programs may consider some of these options of particular relevance and will advise students accordingly.

Second and third year options available as school-wide units:

ATS2381 /ATS3381 Global Change and Changing Identities in Asia
ATS2384 /ATS3384 Women in Asia : Gender, Tradition and Modernity
ATS3747 Theory and Research in Asian Studies
ATS2627 /ATS3627 Global Cultures, Local Traditions: Creating and Consuming (Popular) Culture
ATS2622 /ATS3622 Production, Consumerism and the Environment in the Contemporary World
ATS2405 /ATS3405 Introduction to Critical Theory
ATS3816 The Social Context of Language Learning
ATS2678 /ATS3678 Language and Identity
ATS2671 /ATS3671 Managing Intercultural Communication

Further information

Diploma in Languages: Chinese

The Diploma in Languages is an undergraduate qualification that permits students from other faculties (Business and Economics, Science, Engineering, etc.) to complete a language major while completing their primary undergraduate degree. The Diploma can introduce you as a beginner to a new language, or allow you to build on your existing expertise in a language.

By undertaking a Diploma in Languages you will boost your appeal to prospective employers and have the opportunity to pursue your language interests while you are taking you bachelor’s degree in another faculty.

For entry to the Diploma, you must be enrolled in a bachelor’s degree at Monash or another university. Students in double degrees may also apply.

The Diploma in Languages adds an extra major to your main degree. You complete 48 points of study in Arts. It usually takes three to four years to complete, but that time may be reduced if you receive credit for electives already completed, or if you participate in the Chinese Incountry Program.

For more information, consult the School’s Diploma in Languages page, or contact the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics by phone (03 9905-2223) or e-mail.

Further information

Language Unit Coordinators

Chinese Introductory 1 & 2

Mr Scott Grant,
phone 9905 5365
email: scott.grant@monash.edu

Chinese Intermediate 1 & 2

Dr Robert Irving,
phone 9905 2227
email: robert.irving@monash.edu

Chinese Proficient 1 & 2

Dr Lijun Bi,
phone 9905 8132
email: lijun.bi@monash.edu

Chinese Advanced 1 & 2

Dr Hui Huang,
phone 9905 2211
email: hui.huang@monash.edu

Chinese Advanced 3 & 4

Ms Hui Xu
phone 9905 2954
email: hui.xu@monash.edu

Chinese Advanced 5 & 6

Ms Hui Xu
phone 9905 2954
email: hui.xu@monash.edu

Further information

Home – introduction

Chinese is one of the largest language programs at Monash University and is taught on the Clayton campus. Several entry points are available to meet the specific needs of different students, ranging from introductory to advanced proficiency levels.

Chinese language studies are strongly supported by units on Chinese culture, society and politics available both within the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics and in other schools of the Faculty of Arts. Some examples are: Understanding Asia, Understanding Modern and Contemporary China, Chinese Literature and Modernity, and Borderless Media in East Asia.

In addition to an extensive Chinese language program, research on China and Chinese issues is a very important aspect of work within Chinese Studies. The research interests of staff and postgraduate students in the Chinese program cover a great range of political, cultural, historical, social and intellectual issues, such as western development in China, Internet development and its impact on the Chinese social, political and legal systems, contemporary Chinese intellectual development and Chinese children’s literature.

What Level of Chinese Should I Enrol In?

Research

Key Research and Graduate Research Areas
in Chinese Studies

The research strengths of this program are represented below. We welcome applications from prospective PhD and MA students wishing to conduct research on or related to the following key areas.

Chinese critical inquiry (Gloria Davies)
Chinese elite politics (Warren Sun)
Chinese intellectual history and culture (Gloria Davies, Warren Sun)
Chinese literary studies from the late nineteenth century to the present (Gloria Davies)
Chinese as an international language: pedagogy and policy (Hui Huang)
Contemporary History of the People’s Republic of China (Gloria Davies, Warren Sun)
Cyberdissent in the Chinese-speaking world (Gloria Davies)
Democratization in Taiwan and the East Asian region (Bruce Jacobs)
History of Taiwan (Bruce Jacobs)
Modern China: culture, politics and society (Gloria Davies, Bruce JacobsWarren Sun)
Second language acquisition; teaching Chinese as a heritage language (Hui Huang)
Taiwan politics and society (Bruce Jacobs)

Please note that LCL academics frequently co-supervise MA and PhD projects located in programs other than their own. If you intend to work on a project that straddles this and another discipline, we will organize the necessary complement of research expertise to meet your supervision needs.