English for academic purposes and plagiarism

d87cc7f6d4c60b8e025aa24cc0ed1d7c_nThe topic of ‘’ will be explored at the Student Voices mini symposium during semester two O-week.

This cross-disciplinary staff and student event will feature presentations from undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Dr Andrew Johnson will deliver the keynote presentation based on his collaborative paper, “A Rheme of one’s own: How ‘original’ do we expect students to be?”

The Monash-initiated event will include “virtual” attendees from several national and international universities and the symposium will also be streamed live online. It will be held from 10.00-2.00pm on Tuesday 22 July in R7 Theatre, Building 8 at the Clayton campus and will be followed by a light lunch.

Student Voices is officially supported by the Office of the Vice-Provost (Learning and Teaching), the the Office of the Vice-Provost (Graduate Education) and the Monash Institute of Graduate Research.

The symposium will be officially opened by the Vice-Provost Learning and Teaching, Professor Darrell Evans, and officially concluded by the Vice-Provost (Graduate Education), Professor Zlatko Skrbis.

For further information or to enrol, contact Ms Anna Zhang, azha32@student.monash.edu.

 

Perspectives of global engagement curriculum

Cross-Institutional and Interdisciplinary Dialogue on Curriculum for Global Engagement:  Emerging Perspectives and Concerns

Fay Patel PhD
Bond University
fpatel@bond.edu.au

Mingsheng Li PhD
Massey University
m.s.li@massey.nz.ac

Dr Matthew Piscioneri.
Dr Matthew Piscioneri.

Matthew Piscioneri PhD
Monash University
matthew.piscioneri@monash.edu

Abstract :

Inviting stakeholders to engage in dialogue on a curriculum for global engagement and
organizational social responsibility in higher education (HE) is a challenge, especially when one crosses disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The established discourse and practice of internationalization in higher education over the past decades has manifested unresolved tensions and inconsistencies that have restricted the effective conceptualization of the global engagement curriculum.

Upon observing inadequate professional development opportunities for dialogue regarding the global engagement curriculum at their respective universities,
colleagues from Monash University and Deakin University in Australia and Massey  University in New Zealand organized an open forum on the topic.

This cross-institutional, interdisciplinary professional development forum on global engagement in an Australasian context was held in February 2013. The diverse perspectives and concerns that emerged during the forum on the impact of a global engagement curriculum on learning and teaching have been critically reviewed within this theoretically framed discussion paper.

To view paper, click here

 

Live the college life without living on campus

By Barbara Legaspi

University students who live on campus are more engaged and develop better,  a study has found.

Almost all those who took part would recommend it to other students,  among findings of the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement.

Pegasus Deputy College Head, Dr Andrew Johnson, with members of the new college.
Pegasus Deputy College Head, Dr Andrew Johnson (right), with members of the new college.

Monash University last year established four non-residential colleges to enhance students’ social and academic experience throughout their tertiary education, without the need to live on campus.

Caulfield campus hosts Pegasus and Phoenix colleges, while the Clayton campus hosts Centaurus and Orion colleges.

 Non-residential colleges are about having a “different kind of experience” at university, says Olivia Clarke, Phoenix College’s student adviser.

“Advisers work in organising the members who are in their group (called clusters) and we get to work, bring the students together and basically form relationships with them.

“Also, all the advisers are a great support network for each other.”

College life
Monash University’s colleges.

 A non-residential college functions like a club where students can meet new people, take part in sporting activities and attend social events.

 Each college will have about 250 members, 20 college advisers (all senior students) and three members of academic staff.

“I’ve done and experienced a lot of things that I wouldn’t have without being in [a non-residential college]”, Ms Clarke says.

 “Being a part of something that’s trying to achieve unity within the university” is important, she says.

 The non-residential colleges host the first annual ball for the university, the Cross College Ball, to  be held on April 3.

 “It’s just about mingling with students in a fancy, dressy setting,” Ms Clarke says. 

 

Pre-departure orientation of academic writing & reading skills

Pre-departure orientation: General and advanced academic writing and reading skills

Having refined and developed macro-skills related to a culture of critical inquiry the time has now come to refine the more precise aspects of writing in a HDR setting. The devil is in the detail! Below are several tutorials that will help identify common problems in academic writing:

1. writingres

2. critreading

3. reports

 

 

Student-centred learning seminar

Dr Matthew Piscioneri.
Dr Matthew Piscioneri.

A seminar on student-centred learning – contemporary Malaysian and Australian perspective will be held on Monday, March 10 at Monash University’s Clayton campus.

The event is supported by the Monash Malaysian Studies Centre and Associate Dean Education Office from the Faculty of Arts.

For event flyer, click here

Seminar Program:

 No

Name 

Title 

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Nurahimah Mohd. Yusoff 

Student-Centred Learning in Malaysia: A case study 

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ahmad Jelani and 

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Abdul Malek Abdul Karim 

Assessing 21st Century Learning Using Digital 

Tools 

Dr. Noor Hashima Abdul Aziz, Dr. Hamida Bee Bi Abdul Karim and Dr. Rafisah Osman 

Issues and Challenges in Learning and Teaching in Malaysian Education 

No.

Name 

Title 

Dr. Matthew Piscioneri 

The Problem with Problem-Based Learning (especially in a Blended Learning Environment) 

Dr. Lynette Pretorius 

Student-centred learning in an online environment: Learning to critically evaluate sources through self-discovery. 

Marta Spes-Skrbis & Jim Koutsuokos 

Engaging students in extra and co-curricula activities which promote learning skills and personal and critical development of an individual. 

 Register: Matthew.Piscioneri@monash.edu 

Light lunch provided

 

Our people

Dr Andrew Johnson

Andrew  JohnsonI have  a background in literary studies and philosophy and have been teaching in various language and learning roles since 2002.

I joined the Faculty of Arts in my current role in 2007.

I have a strong teaching and research focus on writing, and I am also interested in cultural learning processes and the way we learn to use language in different social contexts.

My current research focus is on how we teach (and how students learn) academic writing, and as part of this I’m especially interested in how lecturers assess and give feedback on aspects of student writing such as grammar, expression and academic style.

Click here to read Dr Johnson’s profile

Email:  Andrew.G.Johnson@monash.edu
Room B418, Caulfield Campus, Building B
Phone: 9903 1196 

 

Dr Matthew Piscioneri

Dr Matthew Piscioneri lectures in Academic and Professional Writing at Monash University, Australia. He obtained his doctorate in Philosophy in 2004 from the University of Queensland, Australia where his dissertation developed a critical reading of Jurgen Habermas’s Theory of Communicative Action.

Matthew PiscioneriHis research examines the internationalization of universities, ethical issues in student care, the delivery of teaching and learning resources at university and tertiary reading requirements.

Recently he has been part of a major research project evaluating student preferences for modes of teaching and learning resource delivery: [www.teachanddelivery.net].

“My research interests and my teaching are closely linked. I am presently engaged in a critical study of the ‘international’ academy as well as the pre-commencement academic orientation of international students. Come and join us on FaceBook: THE Monash Arts International Students Group”.

Click here to read Dr Piscioneri’s profile

Email: Matthew.Piscioneri@monash.edu
Room B420, Caulfield Campus, Building B
Phone: 9905 5069

 

Writing strategies for students

Academic and Professional Writing (APW) teaches students strategies for successful learning, writing and the effective use of English in Arts degrees through a wide range of programs including units for credit, short courses, seminars, workshops, and individual tutorials.

We work mainly with students from the Faculty of Arts, but also students from other Faculties through our units for credit and seminars.  Our students come from many different backgrounds (local and international, English and Non-English Speaking Background) and from all levels of study in the University, from first year to PhD.

We also offer resources, discussion and collaboration on developing student learning and writing for staff in the faculty of Arts, and contribute to the Faculty’s research through projects and publications, specialising on issues of Academic Language and Learning in Arts and Humanities disciplines.

Units for Credit

APW offer three units for credit.  All units seek to teach students effective writing and communication in academic and professional contexts, as well as effective learning and study techniques.

ATS1297 Academic Writing  /  ATS1298 Professional Writing  /  ATS1340 Words Work

For further details go to our Credit Units page, or for for full availability, eligibility and enrolment information, please see handbook entries for these units (click title above) and/or discuss with your faculty admissions and enrolments staff.

Students from Faculties other than Arts are welcome, and encouraged to enrol in these units.

Individual consultations (one to one teaching)

Drop in sessions are an open office time, no appointment needed, for brief, one to one consultations on any aspect of study and writing in Arts, with AALLU staff.  For timetable click here.

Longer (up to 45 minutes) one to one teaching sessions, or Individual Consultations are available in some circumstances, by appointment.

Postgraduate research, and courswork students and undergraduate students referred by their lecturer or tutor will have priority.

Short Courses, Seminars and Workshops

In some semesters, depending on student interest and availabilty of staff, AALLU may offer short courses, seminars, workshops, and individual tutorials  to help students develop academic literacy and understanding within their disciplines Major or Minor in Arts. Areas covered in previous seminars and workshops include:

  • Organising your work
  • Understanding what your tutors require
  • Reading effectively and critically in Arts units
  • Analysing essay and assignment topics and understanding what you need to do
  • Taking notes and organising them effectively
  • Academic English structure and style
  • Avoiding plagiarism
  • Developing arguments and structuring essays
  • Following presentation conventions (footnotes, bibliographies etc.)

Many of these topics are also covered in our online and print resources.

 

Elective units

APW coordinates and teaches a number of elective units designed to develop students’ academic and professional capacities in language, writing and independent learning. These units are include first year level units, as well as second and third year units (all 6 points) and are open to any student who can take an Arts elective.  Please contact enrolments and admissions in Arts or your home faculty to find out more about eligibility and enrolment. 

To read the handbook entry for each unit, with full details of unit objectives, campus, teaching mode, and assessment click on the title below.

Detailed unit descriptions

Summer semester (January 2014)

ATS1340 – English for academic purposes

This unit will provide students with the opportunity to develop existing skills in the following areas: reading, writing, discussion, note-taking, locating sources, referencing, exam revision, writing critiques, and familiarity with key concepts in the humanities and social sciences. This unit makes these skills its focus and these skills are taught around and through a generalist, foundational or cross disciplinary content with reference to broad conceptual frameworks relevant to Arts units. This unit may be of benefit to: International students, students who have completed VCE ESL, mature-age students and students who wish to focus on the acquisition of academic language and study skills

Semester 1, 2014

ATS1297 Academic writing

A practical and intellectually challenging introduction to writing and study in the university, with a focus on developing students’ ability to write effectively, and think critically, whatever their discipline, course or degree.  This unit is recommended for any commencing first-year students at Monash.

ATS2490 – Advanced Professional Writing

This unit aims to develop students’ professional communication capabilities, to assist students to apply knowledge and skills from an academic context to workplaces, and for students who have undertaken ATS1298, to refine the language and communication abilities learned in the first year unit.
The unit will focus on the production of extended documents in genres used in workplaces, particularly tenders, submissions, proposals, grant applications, instruction manuals, position papers, project reports and accompanying documentation. It is aimed at developing students’ workplace communication, professional English and research abilities within and beyond the academic world.

ATS2743 Build your career: planning and strategies for employability *(Caulfield)

This unit equips students with the capacity to manage their careers lifelong. It contextualises this understanding in the history, sociology, economics and future of work. Work legislation and the role of unions also provide a setting for exploration of career concepts and theories and their application to the individual. Students will develop a career plan based on an awareness of their skills and aspirations and an understanding of approaches to job search , career decision making and managing change.  The unit will be delivered through a mix of lectures and tutorials, and will draw upon students recent or concurrent experience of work.

 

Semester 2, 2014
ATS1298 – Professional writing

In the modern workplace, the ability to communicate well, both in speaking and writing, is highly valued. In this unit we will focus on developing effective communication, particularly in written form, in professional contexts. We will study and produce types of writing and documents that are essential for you to secure professional employment, as well as to thrive in the kind of professional employment you can expect to find as a graduate.

The unit is based in practical exercises to develop your abilities as a writer and also an editor of professional standard texts, but also designed to further your conceptual understanding of key issues in professional communication: audience, context, and language. We will also study principles of ‘information gathering’ and research for professional contexts, and put these into practice through activities and assignments.

ATS2743 Build your career: planning and strategies for employability *(Clayton)

This unit equips students with the capacity to manage their careers lifelong. It contextualises this understanding in the history, sociology, economics and future of work. Work legislation and the role of unions also provide a setting for exploration of career concepts and theories and their application to the individual. Students will develop a career plan based on an awareness of their skills and aspirations and an understanding of approaches to job search , career decision making and managing change.  The unit will be delivered through a mix of lectures and tutorials, and will draw upon students recent or concurrent experience of work.

 

 

Academic English Online

The Academic and Professional Writing team are currently in the process of developing an Academic English course / resource in moodle.  We are planning for a trial version of this to be open for students to enrol in first semester 2014.  The ‘course’ will give a series of modules and self-assessment activities to students to work on their Academic English while studying other units or degrees.   

The unit will not be for credit, and will be open to any interested students for self-enrolment.    

If you are interested in finding out more about this course, please contact Andrew Johnson (Monash staff are also invited to contact us about this trial).

 

Home – introduction

Academic and Professional Writing teaches students strategies for powerful and effective writing and use of English at University, and in professional work beyond degrees, through a range of programs including units for credit (undergraduate and postgraduate coursework electives), online learning (eg. adjunct moodle units – not for credit) occasional seminars and Higher Degree Research Student associate supervision.

We work mainly with students from the Faculty of Arts, but also students from other Faculties through our units for credit and seminars.  Our students come from many different backgrounds (local and international, English and Non-English Speaking Background) and from all levels of study in the University, from first year to PhD.

We also offer resources, discussion and collaboration on developing student learning and writing for staff in the faculty of Arts, especially in the School of Media, Film and Journalism, and contribute to the Faculty’s research through projects and publications, specialising on issues of Academic writing in Arts and Humanities disciplines.

PeopleElective units | Resources |Academic English Online 

PDF documents

Parts of speech [96.2kb pdf]

Parts of sentence [50.7kb pdf]

Finite and non-finite verbs [82.8kb pdf]

Quoting and paraphrasing 1 [44.0kb pdf]

Quoting and paraphrasing 2 [37.7kb pdf]

Writing about the writing of others [51.8kb pdf]

 

Video Resources

Parts of Speech 1 

Parts of Speech 2

Parts of Sentence 1

Parts of Sentence 2

Phrases and Fragments

Clauses

Finite and non-finite verbs

The article in English

Quoting and paraphrasing 1 

Quoting and paraphrasing 2

Writing about the writing of others

Developing a paragraph

Tutorial participation

Presenting in class

 

Research: Theory to Practice

One day intensive seminar for research students

A Saturday workshop (10-3 pm) covering rationales and research questions, methodologies and methods, style in academic writing, literature reviews and analysis techniques.

This program is designed for Honours, Masters (research & Coursework minor theses) and Ph.D candidates.

The seminar covers the following themes:

  • Theme 1: the theory of research
  • Theme 2: the (critical) literature review
  • Theme 3: substantive rationales: focused research questions: effective data collection techniques
  • Theme 4: types of supplementary tasks (critical reviews/annotated bibliographies);
  • Theme 5: structuring a thesis
  • Theme 6: citation and referencing: techniques and rationale
  • Theme 7: plagiarism & paraphrasing
  • Theme 8: style in academic writing
  • Theme 9: case study of the case study
  • Theme 10: the pragmatics of research & the ‘do-ability’ factor

Free. All welcome. To register interest, contact: Matthew.Piscioneri@monash.edu

 

What we do

The Arts Academic Language & Learning Unit teaches students strategies for successful learning, writing and the effective use of English in Arts degrees through a wide range of programs including units for credit, short courses, seminars, workshops, and individual tutorials.

We work mainly with students from the Faculty of Arts, but also students from other Faculties through our units for credit and seminars.  Our students come from many different backgrounds (local and international, English and Non-English Speaking Background) and from all levels of study in the University, from first year to PhD.

We also offer resources, discussion and collaboration on developing student learning and writing for staff in the faculty of Arts, and contribute to the Faculty’s research through projects and publications, specialising on issues of Academic Language and Learning in Arts and Humanities disciplines.

Units for Credit

AALLU offer three units for credit.  All units seek to teach students effective writing and communication in academic and professional contexts, as well as effective learning and study techniques.

ATS1297 Academic Writing  /  ATS1298 Professional Writing  /  ATS1340 Words Work

For further details go to our Credit Units page, or for for full availability, eligibility and enrolment information, please see handbook entries for these units (click title above) and/or discuss with your faculty admissions and enrolments staff.

Students from Faculties other than Arts are welcome, and encouraged to enrol in these units.

Individual consultations (one to one teaching)

Drop in sessions are an open office time, no appointment needed, for brief, one to one consultations on any aspect of study and writing in Arts, with AALLU staff.  For timetable click here.

Longer (up to 45 minutes) one to one teaching sessions, or Individual Consultations are available in some circumstances, by appointment.

Postgraduate research, and courswork students and undergraduate students referred by their lecturer or tutor will have priority.

Short Courses, Seminars and Workshops

In some semesters, depending on student interest and availabilty of staff, AALLU may offer short courses, seminars, workshops, and individual tutorials  to help students develop academic literacy and understanding within their disciplines Major or Minor in Arts. Areas covered in previous seminars and workshops include:

  • Organising your work
  • Understanding what your tutors require
  • Reading effectively and critically in Arts units
  • Analysing essay and assignment topics and understanding what you need to do
  • Taking notes and organising them effectively
  • Academic English structure and style
  • Avoiding plagiarism
  • Developing arguments and structuring essays
  • Following presentation conventions (footnotes, bibliographies etc.)

Many of these topics are also covered in our online and print resources.

 

Orientation Week – get the most out of it

Orientation week (O’Week) is the official start to the semester. Faculties and other departements of the University run compulsory and optional events for new students.

These events are designed to help you:

  • Get organised for your studies
  • Become familiar with the campus, staff and support services
  • Meet other students

Go to the Orientation ePlanner to create and save your own plan.

Only able to attend some days?

  1. Ensure you attend the compulsory events relevant to you
  2. Check the optional events for fun or informative activities
  3. Check the campus introduction for campus maps, parking, transport, etc

Student experiences

Hear from other students about their experiences in settling into university life.

 

APW services for Postgraduate Students

Seminars

APW offers specialised seminar series designed for postgraduate students in particular (click below for details). These seminar series are free and open to all currently enrolled Monash students.

Advanced Writing for Research Seminars 2014 (masters research and PhD) – 2014  schedule coming soon

Research: from Theory to Practice

History of Ideas: A Culture of Inquiry.

We also run a number of clases and workshops on study, writing and language, integrated into Masters coursework degrees including: Masters of Environment and Sustainability, Masters of Communication and Media, Masters of Tourism, Masters of Asian Studies and Masters of Publishing and Editing.

For details, contact your course, program or unit coordinator.

 

Research

Arts Education Research Group (MEERG-CATS) 

Links and information for researchers and staff interested in educational, and academic language and learning issues in Arts, at Monash and beyond.

For more information, or to register interest and link to the group, email Andrew.

Seminars at Monash

Send proposals, suggestions or expressions of interest in our planned semester two seminar series (for staff and postgraduates). Researchers are encouraged to present work in progress, or previews of upcoming conference presentations.

Advertise your seminar series or lecture here 

Associations and External Links

Association for Academic Language and Learning

HERDSA (Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia)

Applied Linguistics Association of Australia

Independent Learning Association

Annotated bibliography in progress – suggestions for key resources and readings welcome.